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Tongue tip should NOT be on roof of mouth  

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xDJ
 xDJ
Active Member

Intimidating wall of text but please read.

For a while now I've been wanting to point out a mistake a lot of us have been making while mewing.

I read about correct oral posture, adopted it and kept at it for several months. No positive results at all. Things actually looked the slightest bit worse if I'm being critical. (Weaker submental area, bigger buccinators, dark circles under eyes). This was very strange and frustrating to me so I really had to give this some thought. Because something that's good for your body should feel good and natural, right? I understand that posture correction isn't an easy process but it shouldn't have been this uncomfortable.

I also wondered for a long time why "mewing" didn't feel natural at all, why I had to consciously think about doing it. That didn't seem feasible long term because when we're asleep we no longer have conscious control of our tongue, not to mention I didn't want to have to focus on it all the time. Trying to keep the tongue on the roof of the mouth incorrectly (tip behind incisors) required focus that caused me so much trouble falling and staying asleep. 

Searched for answers to that issue on here and on those other forums. I found a few mentions of something similar that people seemed to brush right past.

The tip of your tongue should NOT be on the roof behind the incisors on "the spot". There is a spot and that spot should have pressure on it, but not from the tip of the tongue.

On mobile so I can't tell how my attachments will be formatted. I drew these a while back with intentions to post them here and share my thoughts but I figured it'd be too hard to explain thoroughly.

"Incorrect" oral posture asks you to place the tip of your tongue (yellow) on the spot (purple) and raise the posterior. Green arrows show the direction of pressure with this idea.

"Correct" oral posture says the tip of the tongue need not be on the roof. Front/middle of the tongue is responsible for hitting the spot. This means:

  1. The tip can be further ahead (though not against the incisors).
  2. The middle can be positioned more forwards against the spot.
  3. The posterior third of the tongue is free to be held up without blocking the airway.
  4. The roof of the mouth has pressure being applied front to back shown by the green arrows.

Laterally, the center of the tongue is raised highest. This means a low intermolar width shouldn't hinder this process. Pressure being applied in the correct places should increase intermolar width.

For the past month I've been adopting oral posture this way and there has been a great difference so far. 

  • Tongue stays up on the roof without thought. Falling asleep is much easier.
  • Breathing is also easier due to posterior having more space this way.
  • Masseters feeling much stronger (molars evenly clench during swallow).
  • Submental muscles tightening up due to correct use.
  • Buccinators shrinking due to lack of use.

These positive changes occurring so quickly after months of frustration is a pretty big deal imo. I'm so sad and tired of reading people's posts about feeling confused and desperate for answers cause things don't feel right to them either. On here, on other forums, on Youtube comments.. So many questions, so much confusion. Figured I'd share this realization.

 

 

 

 

 

Quote
Posted : 09/09/2018 11:33 pm
AMS1996, itsj0nny, Tetiana and 8 people liked
xDJ
 xDJ
Active Member

Really wish Mike would have put more emphasis on THIS extremely helpful picture that he included in one of his videos. I came across it today and it basically confirms what I was thinking. Again, my yellow dot marks the tip of the tongue.

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Posted : 09/09/2018 11:35 pm
Tetiana, thecowsaysmew, krollic and 1 people liked
Banknote
Eminent Member

looks interesting, good post I will follow this topic

A lei do esforço nunca falha

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/09/2018 11:59 pm
krollic
Estimable Member

I do this instinctually. Trying to force the tip behind the incisors AND have the back up is so uncomfortable, especially for us with more recessed faces because it forces you to scrunch up your tongue very hard.

good post man

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/09/2018 12:25 am
Tetiana, Gordk123, Phil343443 and 1 people liked
varbrah
Estimable Member

1) In your first drawing of "incorrect" tongue position you are assuming that all we've been doing is sticking the tip of our tongue against the incisive papilla without any engagement of the posterior or medial tongue against the palate like idiots. Wrong plain and simple.

2) How can the tip be "further ahead" when the incisive papilla is as far you can go without making contact with the incisors?

I am going to give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you are confused here, either about what the consensus on tongue posture is here, or in your interpretation of Mike's diagram. Have you been accidentally keeping your tongue tip on the anterior frontal ridges of the palate rather than the incisive papilla or something?

In case you are confused, here's how to find out where the tip of your tongue should rest according to John Mew:
Step 1: Make an "n" sound.
Step 2: Pay attention to where the tip of your tongue is (hint: it's the incisive papilla)
Step 3: Paypal me $50

If you're still confused here is a diagram from Dr. Hang (notice the tongue right behind the incisors):

Image result for proper oral posture

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/09/2018 12:26 am
Jangu, J3tze, notnull and 5 people liked
Banknote
Eminent Member

i can do it

A lei do esforço nunca falha

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/09/2018 12:35 am
krollic
Estimable Member

@varbrah  gotta take into account that our jaws/maxillas are further back than they should be meaning that our tongues have less space to rest. If we had ideal development, then yes it SHOULD be at the IP naturally but more most people if they relax their tongue I bet their tip touches the teeth or goes beyond it

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Posted : 10/09/2018 12:40 am
xDJ liked
xDJ
 xDJ
Active Member

@varbrah

To your first point: Not implying anyone is an idiot since we're all here on this site to respectfully discuss ideas and figure things out together. Below "Incorrect", green arrows show points of contact and where I was applying pressure. There's an arrow at both the anterior and posterior.

To your second point: "How can the tip be further ahead?" I agree with @krollic 's response. Also, in Mew's photo, the tip of the tongue is floating slightly further than and below the incisive papilla, not pressing against it, or the teeth.

My sketches were an attempt at explaining what I was experiencing a while ago. After seeing Mike's video, I prefer his to be the image of "Correct".

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Posted : 10/09/2018 1:21 am
varbrah
Estimable Member

@krollic Right, yeah so maybe he should include a disclaimer or something in the post there and not throw out blanket claims/blatant disinformation regarding what is (and isn't) correct tongue posture to confuse newbs? Not only is this NOT supported by Mike Mew as he claimed (quite the opposite), it is not supported by any serious figure in the field of orthotropics.

@xDJ Now you are claiming that your drawing of "incorrect" oral posture only applied to you, when your original post made it quite clear that you thought it applied to everyone on here who was keeping the tip of their tongue on the incisive papilla.

Even if your drawing did apply to you and only you, you were not even correctly assuming your claimed "incorrect" oral posture (as described here:  https://the-great-work.org/guide-to-proper-tongue-posture-mewing/) in the first place. You have clearly never had proper tongue posture in your life, so what makes you think should be able to mew perfectly without effort? According to your drawing you were not even engaging your medial tongue against your palate??? Training your tongue to fit in a given space and likewise to engage against the palate properly when you have never done it in the first place is difficult and requires time and conscious effort (took me over a year to get it down), but instead you want to be lazy, shove it into a position its not supposed to be in, and then post on the internet about how we've been doing it all wrong and you've found a better way to mew.

I also had and still have much less than ideal development both in terms of forward growth as well as the transverse dimensions of my palate and I can still manage to fit my tongue and assume the correct posture -- stop being lazy -- go visit and work with a myofunctional therapist (highly recommend, mine helped me with not only fitting my tongue into the limited space of my palate, but also gave me exercises to help correctly train and accelerate the development of proper oral habits) AND go to the doc and see if you have a tongue tie that is limiting your tongue's mobility (quick and painless surgery to fix if so).

The tongue is extremely versatile in terms of the spaces it can occupy and the dimensions it can take on, so if none of the above helps then your jaw is clearly FUBAR and you need a) bone-anchored expansion (a la MARPE or preferably Won Moon's MSE) + bone-anchored maxillary protraction OR b) jaw surgery, because no amount of mewing as an adult (improper, at that) with limited growth potential is going to have nearly the effect you need it to have in order to improve your maxilla, craniofacial structure/proportions, and quality of life unless you are willing to wait at least a decade or more.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/09/2018 2:08 am
Progress
Member Moderator

I may be able to shed some light into this, since I have gone through the exact same sentiment.

What your method essentially "achieves" is increased room for the posterior tongue. By sliding the tip downward toward the lower incisors you simulate increased forward growth of the palate. Cramming the tongue forward along the palate is an excellent movement as far as myofunctional exercises go, and possibly even helpful for short term postural improvement (I personally increased IMW by 4 mm while doing such). In the long term though, it's not that helpful, since not having tip on the papilla encourages postural collapse into kyphosis (went through this too). Only by having the tip anchored against the papilla can the whole cervical spine rest against the maxilla.

A relevant issue here is that when performing the McKenzie tuck, it's easy to tilt the head too much down. This, already by itself, will make your proposed method feel like a more functional way of mewing, even though in reality it is not. 

As you tuck your chin in, you want to maintain your head in a generously upright angle (perhaps even in a seemingly upward tilt) so that your occlusion remains or less parallel with the horizon. You will find that by angling your palate like this, the tip/papilla does generate leverage, by which the posterior tongue will automatically raise towards the roof of the mouth. By tilting the head backwards you will also feel how your whole posterior and anterior torso begins to engage as a cohesive unit, as the spinal posture begins to fall into place.

In this way it's better to begin the McKenzie tuck from an excessively upward head angle than an excessively downward one. You will start from a head position that is roughly the angle of your natural forward head posture, only without having the head forward. Your jaws will be in correct alignment with the spine straight from the beginning. Then, as the maxilla swings upward, the jaws will maintain their relation with the spine, but the rest of the skull will be able to rotate down to a more horizontal position.

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Posted : 10/09/2018 10:48 am
ciecie, Angelina, alfio and 3 people liked
xDJ
 xDJ
Active Member

@progress I appreciate your input.. Will experiment with this idea.

Also, does that mean the image of correct oral posture in Mike's video is wrong? The tip isn't on the spot

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/09/2018 5:46 pm
Progress
Member Moderator

The picture certainly seems ambiguous. I think it would be a worthwhile question to ask directly from himself.

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Posted : 10/09/2018 6:05 pm
Odys
 Odys
Eminent Member

Progress,

Nice to make the distinction between posture and exercises in moving forward of the incisive papilla. Just maintaining posture at the incisive papilla risks lots of people with tipped in incisors staying that way for ever, or at least longer than they need to. I think many people do not even want our front teeth at a ‘natural’ angle. We have come to think a bit tipped in is aesthetic. I suppose we can each stop where we want to. The last two videos I have seen Mike Mew speak in he has seemed less than fully in control of his lips. It occurred to me that he had given himself a bit too much tooth to manoeuvre round easily.

The point you make on the Mckenzie chin tuck is good and should be made often as I seem to remember a Mike Mew demonstration of it that shows exactly what you correctly say should be avoided or improved on.

“Only by having the tip anchored against the papilla can the whole cervical spine rest against the maxilla.” I presume that you intended to write “tongue” .

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/09/2018 7:13 pm
Progress
Member Moderator

Admittedly it was kind of awkwardly put. What I tried to say was that once the tongue is properly anchored against the palate, it will act as a stabilizing "middleman" between the jaws and the cervical spine, and that such stabilization is harder to achieve when the tip of the tongue is not in its proper place at the papilla.

I agree, the tilt of the incisors is something that each individual is going to have to decide for themselves. It's worth keeping in mind that as the maxilla swings up & forward, the incisors will rotate with it (in relation to the face). Thus, perhaps not much attention should be paid to the tilt of the incisors until after maxillary movement has been attained. It may be that at that point no further tilting will be required. Of course though, progressing to that point may take years, so it's understandable if someone wants to aim for minor forward movement of the jaw by proclining the teeth in the meanwhile.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/09/2018 7:53 pm
Abdulrahman
Reputable Member
Posted by: Progress

What your method essentially "achieves" is increased room for the posterior tongue. By sliding the tip downward toward the lower incisors you simulate increased forward growth of the palate. Cramming the tongue forward along the palate is an excellent movement as far as myofunctional exercises go, and possibly even helpful for short term postural improvement (I personally increased IMW by 4 mm while doing such). In the long term though, it's not that helpful, since not having tip on the papilla encourages postural collapse into kyphosis (went through this too). Only by having the tip anchored against the papilla can the whole cervical spine rest against the maxilla.

 

Does this sound like what @rogerramjet was doing to speed up him expansion with FAGGA?

 

Posted by: rogerramjet

2. I've figured out how to activate the pad much more effectively than when I first did it. I was originally told to "tap, tap, tap" the pad with my tongue, but I never felt like the tip had much strength and all ti did was fatigue my tongue. Now I use the little nodules on the back of my anterior six as a guide, and I use that to leverage the mid of my tongue against the pad, which has so much more strength behind it.

 

 

my story: http://www.aljabri.com/blog/my-story/

ReplyQuote
Posted : 11/09/2018 10:35 am
EddieMoney
Reputable Member

Putting the tongue at the incisive papilla doesn't procline your incisors. I wish it did. Considering that a wide palate with proclined incisors means your mandible can slide forward and give you a stronger chin.

Retroclined incisors make your mandible sit further back than necessary. This also leads to turkey neck and a weak chin. 

The only time proclined incisors are "bad" is when the upper arch is V shaped and narrow, causing bimaxillary protrusion. In this case the narrow upper arch prevents the mandible from protracting to maintain occlusion and the incisors push the lips out making the nasolabial angle acute and mentolabial fold almost absent which pushes the lips out too far ahead of the chin. But this is due to the narrow archway combined with the proclined incisors , not proclined incisors themselves. 

Brad Pitt for instance has proclined incisors but his wide arch allowed his mandible to be one of his well known and aesthetic features.

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRFH2zBWkJaCOD2cKWEPBPG1DBtPnX5Zn3nlcr_5vS7dkhFakTH

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Posted : 11/09/2018 12:53 pm
Rockyp33
Reputable Member

@odys ur saying proper tongue posture means retroclined teeht wont tilt back to normal if so then how do you procline the teeth back to the natural angle

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13/09/2018 7:54 pm
Rockyp33
Reputable Member

@eddiemoney whats the best way to procline

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13/09/2018 7:57 pm
andread24
Active Member

probably this is the posture i've uses since now, if i put the tip of the tongue on the spot i have the feeling that the tongue is "too short" to cover entirely the palate

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/09/2018 2:51 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: Rockyp33

@eddiemoney whats the best way to procline

Wish I knew my man. Atm the only "proclination" of my incisors has been due to maxillary upswing and not any force on them. Personally if I tried positioning my tongue further forward to make contact with the teeth, the soft palate connection would be lost. So I feel my tongue isn't long enough for that since I feel it disengage when I slide it forward even a bit. The incisive papilla is how far I can reach while maintaining contact with the soft palate.

 

Why do I say no proclination has happened? My teeth fit exactly the same and my bite is just as deep. However my incisors are not as retroclined because my maxilla has had minor upswing which has made my incisors look more vertical when smiling from the side whereas before they looked severely angled backwards and away from the face. Also my gum exposure has lessened and my chin has advanced. But I do not have proclined incisors yet. Almost vertical doe at least yessuh yessuh 😏 

   

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/09/2018 5:25 pm
Rockyp33 liked
Rockyp33
Reputable Member

eddy nice job bb

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Posted : 14/09/2018 6:10 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member

But my hope is that my tongue on incisive papilla position causes minor upswing of the alveolar ridge. If that even is possible. I know my alveolar ridge is deeper than it should because my orthodontist retroclined my incisors with elastics anchored to the lower molars. 

The sad part is that if I wanted a device to procline them it would be thousands of dollars. So I just hope that with time my tongue gets longer or enough upswing happens that the ridge isn't so downward facing. 

Again for those who doubt. Proclined incisors are perfectly natural and allow mandibular upswing. But the missing piece is that the palate has to be wide enough for mandibular protraction . If too narrow then your facial aesthetics are wrecked and you look like this:

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTN4vU4iOq5phAhUeuUfC3qkEmvY4shrTk7NE6vAbPmagiDUkMJ

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/09/2018 9:32 pm
sparkyyy
New Member

How's that even possible? I keep both the tip and the back of my tongue  on top of my palate. Is that bad?

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Posted : 17/09/2018 12:42 pm
Rockyp33
Reputable Member

Yeah i noticed some guy at my college he probs has a narrow pallete but his front upper teeth are veryyy proclined so his bite looks good

ReplyQuote
Posted : 17/09/2018 8:15 pm
Rockyp33
Reputable Member

@eddiemoney that bite honestly is not bad at all.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 17/09/2018 8:20 pm
rogerramjet
Eminent Member
Posted by: EddieMoney

Putting the tongue at the incisive papilla doesn't procline your incisors. I wish it did. Considering that a wide palate with proclined incisors means your mandible can slide forward and give you a stronger chin.

Retroclined incisors make your mandible sit further back than necessary. This also leads to turkey neck and a weak chin. 

The only time proclined incisors are "bad" is when the upper arch is V shaped and narrow, causing bimaxillary protrusion. In this case the narrow upper arch prevents the mandible from protracting to maintain occlusion and the incisors push the lips out making the nasolabial angle acute and mentolabial fold almost absent which pushes the lips out too far ahead of the chin. But this is due to the narrow archway combined with the proclined incisors , not proclined incisors themselves. 

Brad Pitt for instance has proclined incisors but his wide arch allowed his mandible to be one of his well known and aesthetic features.

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRFH2zBWkJaCOD2cKWEPBPG1DBtPnX5Zn3nlcr_5vS7dkhFakTH

Hey Eddie,

Out of curiosity, where is the line drawn between proclined incisors and flaring as seen in FAGGA?

Is there a golden angle that should be achieved for incisors in an ideally positioned maxilla?

Thanks 🙂

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/09/2018 2:34 am
Abdulrahman
Reputable Member
Posted by: EddieMoney

Wish I knew my man. Atm the only "proclination" of my incisors has been due to maxillary upswing and not any force on them. Personally if I tried positioning my tongue further forward to make contact with the teeth, the soft palate connection would be lost. So I feel my tongue isn't long enough for that since I feel it disengage when I slide it forward even a bit. The incisive papilla is how far I can reach while maintaining contact with the soft palate.

Or that your hyoid bone is too low and dragging your tongue down with it.

my story: http://www.aljabri.com/blog/my-story/

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/09/2018 6:08 am
Abdulrahman
Reputable Member
Posted by: rogerramjet

Hey Eddie,

Out of curiosity, where is the line drawn between proclined incisors and flaring as seen in FAGGA?

Is there a golden angle that should be achieved for incisors in an ideally positioned maxilla?

Thanks 🙂

There are set measurements for determining teeth angulation. Based on the cephalometric analysis standard the doctor is using those can look like the ones in the picture. In reality, most doctors simply just eye it because they are not very detail oriented and do not want to subject their patients to many x-rays for fine adjustments.

The excessive inclination you see in mid cases of FAGGA treatments are normal consequence of the metal fitting that sits behind the front teeth and supports the pad. As you know better than any of us, the springs apply light pressure to hold the pad in place. This pressure changes the angulation of the front teeth slightly.

After the FAGGA phase is complete the front teeth angulation is corrected with the Controlled Arch braces. The whole fuss you saw in the other thread was mainly about that. There is another reason actually. Before treatment Ronald had a pretty low nasolabial angle, so any increase in the inclination of his front teeth would have made him drop excessively low. To the point where it looks objectionable.

 

my story: http://www.aljabri.com/blog/my-story/

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/09/2018 6:21 am
sebastian
Eminent Member
Posted by: EddieMoney

But my hope is that my tongue on incisive papilla position causes minor upswing of the alveolar ridge. If that even is possible. I know my alveolar ridge is deeper than it should because my orthodontist retroclined my incisors with elastics anchored to the lower molars. 

The sad part is that if I wanted a device to procline them it would be thousands of dollars. So I just hope that with time my tongue gets longer or enough upswing happens that the ridge isn't so downward facing. 

Again for those who doubt. Proclined incisors are perfectly natural and allow mandibular upswing. But the missing piece is that the palate has to be wide enough for mandibular protraction . If too narrow then your facial aesthetics are wrecked and you look like this:

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTN4vU4iOq5phAhUeuUfC3qkEmvY4shrTk7NE6vAbPmagiDUkMJ

 

I have proclined incisors, but a narrow palate. Should i still have my tongue on the incisive papilla, or do whats said in this post?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 30/10/2018 4:20 pm
RamonT
Eminent Member
Posted by: xDJ

Intimidating wall of text but please read.

For a while now I've been wanting to point out a mistake a lot of us have been making while mewing.

I read about correct oral posture, adopted it and kept at it for several months. No positive results at all. Things actually looked the slightest bit worse if I'm being critical. (Weaker submental area, bigger buccinators, dark circles under eyes). This was very strange and frustrating to me so I really had to give this some thought. Because something that's good for your body should feel good and natural, right? I understand that posture correction isn't an easy process but it shouldn't have been this uncomfortable.

I also wondered for a long time why "mewing" didn't feel natural at all, why I had to consciously think about doing it. That didn't seem feasible long term because when we're asleep we no longer have conscious control of our tongue, not to mention I didn't want to have to focus on it all the time. Trying to keep the tongue on the roof of the mouth incorrectly (tip behind incisors) required focus that caused me so much trouble falling and staying asleep. 

Searched for answers to that issue on here and on those other forums. I found a few mentions of something similar that people seemed to brush right past.

The tip of your tongue should NOT be on the roof behind the incisors on "the spot". There is a spot and that spot should have pressure on it, but not from the tip of the tongue.

On mobile so I can't tell how my attachments will be formatted. I drew these a while back with intentions to post them here and share my thoughts but I figured it'd be too hard to explain thoroughly.

"Incorrect" oral posture asks you to place the tip of your tongue (yellow) on the spot (purple) and raise the posterior. Green arrows show the direction of pressure with this idea.

"Correct" oral posture says the tip of the tongue need not be on the roof. Front/middle of the tongue is responsible for hitting the spot. This means:

  1. The tip can be further ahead (though not against the incisors).
  2. The middle can be positioned more forwards against the spot.
  3. The posterior third of the tongue is free to be held up without blocking the airway.
  4. The roof of the mouth has pressure being applied front to back shown by the green arrows.

Laterally, the center of the tongue is raised highest. This means a low intermolar width shouldn't hinder this process. Pressure being applied in the correct places should increase intermolar width.

For the past month I've been adopting oral posture this way and there has been a great difference so far. 

  • Tongue stays up on the roof without thought. Falling asleep is much easier.
  • Breathing is also easier due to posterior having more space this way.
  • Masseters feeling much stronger (molars evenly clench during swallow).
  • Submental muscles tightening up due to correct use.
  • Buccinators shrinking due to lack of use.

These positive changes occurring so quickly after months of frustration is a pretty big deal imo. I'm so sad and tired of reading people's posts about feeling confused and desperate for answers cause things don't feel right to them either. On here, on other forums, on Youtube comments.. So many questions, so much confusion. Figured I'd share this realization.

 

 

 

 

 

That is why i believe the anchor i use is better, i named it (The Pocket) =_= , because that is the way the tongue feels in there and with minimum suction the tongue gets right in :

https://the-great-work.org/community/case-discussions/a-better-anchor-for-the-whole-tongue-for-mewing-imho-it-will-cut-by-half-or-less-the-time-it-takes-to-seeing-result/

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Posted : 17/11/2018 12:03 pm
Brazilianjewbro
New Member

Starting mewing yesterday..when hard mewing for 2 hours or so I feel slight pain in my cheekbones, nasal bridge and forehead. Should my tongue tip be touching my incisors or not? If I relax it falls down there.

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Posted : 17/11/2018 2:04 pm
Le_Fort_or_Bust
Trusted Member

So can we have consensus where tip of tongue should be? Is it letter "n" place?

30 yo, need to expand palate, move maxilla upward and forward, reduce gonial angle.

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Posted : 17/11/2018 6:33 pm
Couda
Eminent Member

@BrazilianJewBro

It should not touch the front teeth. Only push upwards, not forwards. The biggest force should come from the very back of the tongue.

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Posted : 18/11/2018 5:06 am
Iystral
New Member

I'm having trouble reaching the posterior third of roof of the mouth. It feels like no matter how hard I suck up I cannot reach the soft palate with my tongue. Is there any way to go about this?

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Posted : 19/11/2018 1:36 am
Arkey
Active Member

@lystral

I'm finding that it comes with time and focus.

Just like when you start working out for the first time, and realise that you can tense muscles on command that you previously had no control over.

When for weeks you are attempting to apply pressure with as much of your tongue as possible, it will become stronger, and you will develop more control over it - at the moment the posterior third is probably very weak, and you have not developed that control.

I am finding after having hard-mewed consistently for a few weeks, I am only just developing some control over that posterior third.

It seems this is all an individual learning process, as much as it is following prescripted steps.

- Mewing for 6+ months
- IMW: 35mm (no expansion)
- Sleep on the floor without a pillow
- Tape mouth at night
- Continue to emphasise chin-tuck/occipital drive for extended periods
- Chew Mastic Tears for 1 hour every other day

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Posted : 19/11/2018 6:23 pm
Le_Fort_or_Bust
Trusted Member

Bump, can we have a consensus on this? This is very important.

30 yo, need to expand palate, move maxilla upward and forward, reduce gonial angle.

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Posted : 26/11/2018 2:37 pm
Abdulrahman
Reputable Member
Posted by: Le_Fort_or_Bust

Bump, can we have a consensus on this? This is very important.

The tip of the tongue should be resting on the N spot in the roof of the mouth. Not being able to raise the posterior third is no reason to drop the tip. The reason why people struggle with their posterior third is because they do not have:

  • experience engaging suction
  • strength in their tongue
  • enough width in their upper palate
  • proper head posture and the associated hyoid high position

Fix all of those and you will not even have to think about where to place your tongue. You would just have to place the tip of your tongue on the N spot and everything goes in place automatically. 

Now good luck finding anyone on this forum that does that. That's why you will keep seeing those kinds of topics that serve no purpose but to unintentionally confuse people.

my story: http://www.aljabri.com/blog/my-story/

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Posted : 26/11/2018 10:41 pm
Apollo and RamonT liked
Strawberrylibra
New Member

Thank you everyone for the beneficial info! 

I have been attempting to mew for a couple months and am now noticing teeth dents on the side of my tounge. Is this normal? Am I mewing incorrectly:/?

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Posted : 20/03/2019 2:09 pm
sky
 sky
New Member
Posted by: Strawberrylibra

Thank you everyone for the beneficial info! 

I have been attempting to mew for a couple months and am now noticing teeth dents on the side of my tounge. Is this normal? Am I mewing incorrectly:/?

It sounds like either your tongue is too big, or your palate is too narrow.  I have a pretty large tongue too but the sides of my tongue do not hit my teeth, or at the very least, not hard enough to leave imprints.  The OP put up a really good diagram, and if yo follow the proper posture, you should be ok.  Did you feel any aching sensation on your teeth during your months of mewing, especially the top ones?

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Posted : 20/03/2019 3:39 pm
James
Eminent Member

This post shows the difficulty of Mewing when there is a lack of anterior space. The problem I had when I started was that if I put the tip on the spot, then I had no room to raise the back of the tongue and the hyoid bone. But if I raised the back of the tongue and the hyoid, then the tongue tip would have to move forward past the spot, or even peel off the roof of the mouth. This dilemma has improved with AGGA, though the AGGA pad is currently blocking the spot, so I can't fully appreciate all my new space yet.

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Posted : 20/03/2019 7:55 pm
JawShrunk123
Active Member

Bro, I did not read the entire forum but this caught my eye. I had bad tongue posture throughout puberty, and ended up with a slightly smaller face than I did in the begining of puberty (I used to have excellent tongue posture). And that whole tongue resting on incisor papille thing seemed to unarutral, and swallowing was so hard when I tried mewing. I kinda messed up my entire body because of this...to say the least.

Ideally, how should my tongue posture be. My tongue is too big for my jaws, and now I am confused how to rest it.

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Posted : 21/03/2019 10:16 pm
TheJonNelson
Active Member

isn't that photo the tongue is on the incissors?

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Posted : 08/04/2019 9:44 pm
Forwardthinker1
New Member

How do I know if I’m engaging the medial tongue?

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Posted : 19/05/2019 11:07 am
TomatoPotato
New Member

@abdulrahman

Can you explain to me in depth on how to mew? I’ve seen so many different ways of people doing it, but It seems like you know what your doing so would you please explain on how to correctly do it? Thank you!

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Posted : 29/08/2019 10:16 pm
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