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Skull Suture Fusion (Research Video)

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Apollo
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I'm sure you're familiar with images like this showing the increasing interdigitation of the midpalatal suture with advancing age. I imagine something similar occurs in other craniofacial sutures. So I think it's an over-simplification to just call a suture open or closed. There seems to be a spectrum with reducing mobility from bones essentially held together by connective tissue to bony entanglement to outright obliteration/ossification. Do you think this is a one-way progression, or could the body signal to reverse and become less interdigitated? Dr. Moon thinks the MSE causes some biological demineralization of midpalatal linkages, but also some mechanical breakage, depending on the rate of expansion. It also seems to mobilize other surrounding sutures. Can something similar be a achieved without the force of a bone-anchored expander pulling them apart, when even that fails sometimes?

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Posted : 26/06/2021 3:01 pm
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Posted by: @apollo

I'm sure you're familiar with images like this showing the increasing interdigitation of the midpalatal suture with advancing age. I imagine something similar occurs in other craniofacial sutures. So I think it's an over-simplification to just call a suture open or closed. There seems to be a spectrum with reducing mobility from bones essentially held together by connective tissue to bony entanglement to outright obliteration/ossification. Do you think this is a one-way progression, or could the body signal to reverse and become less interdigitated? Dr. Moon thinks the MSE causes some biological demineralization of midpalatal linkages, but also some mechanical breakage, depending on the rate of expansion. It also seems to mobilize other surrounding sutures. Can something similar be a achieved without the force of a bone-anchored expander pulling them apart, when even that fails sometimes?

@apollo

You are right that it is an oversimplification to call the sutures open or closed as the sutures go through stages of development and closing. I will have to experiment with how to phrase it: Healthy sutures vs sutures that are pathological/ossified/obliterated/ankylosis.

Although the interdigitation decreases mobility of the bones, I believe that there is still enough mobility in there to get everything open if using oscillating force. Especially if the force isn't in directions that are hindered by interdigitation. Taking the mid palatal suture for example: While the side-to-side motion may be somewhat restricted, the up-down motion is not. The restoration of healthy craniosacral rhythm should accomplish the demineralization we are looking for, and I have little doubt that the interdigitated segments of bone can and will remodel to allow for movement and to set into new relative positions.

For the mid-palatal especially this seems likely, as the vomer comes down on top of the mid-palatal and the vomer/ethmoid connect into the dura mater sheath which is said to move heavily during craniosacral motion. So the mid-palatal ridge should gently rock up and down, keeping it open and able to remodel.

To further clarify - from the side in pictures it may look as if the parietal and temporal bones form a clean dome, when in actuality the parietal slides under the temporal and allows movement. A similar situation is true for the frontal and parietal.

So the movement we are looking for at most sutures is not to have them move directly in opposition to their interdigitation, but to have them flex against eachother perpendicular or at some angle to the interdigitation. This will prevent/reverse ossification; the interdigitation will remain as a feature of the mature suture, but the suture can function as a growth site and the interdigitated bone will remodel as needed.

I'll post some pictures here and continue in my next post

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Topic starter Posted : 27/06/2021 11:04 pm
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Posted by: @apollo

Dr. Moon thinks the MSE causes some biological demineralization of midpalatal linkages, but also some mechanical breakage, depending on the rate of expansion. It also seems to mobilize other surrounding sutures. Can something similar be a achieved without the force of a bone-anchored expander pulling them apart, when even that fails sometimes?

I think everyone would be familiar with the concept of flexing something back and forth repeatedly until it becomes pliable so that you can actually break it apart. Like a thick piece of cardboard or even a piece of aluminum like a paperclip - you bend it back and forth until the material getting bent softens enough to actually snap off.

Studies show that bone/sutures respond very well to oscillating force rather than continuous force (Alt-RAMEC, this will be the topic of my next video. Example article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19216603/)

Even these studies fall far short of my proposal, however, as they oscillation/alternation is happening every few days at best, weeks at most. Even then, they show significant improvement in growth over static force.

Restoration of cranial rhythm would mean that the sutures return to a state of flexing, causing the deminalization and keeping them nice and pliable and responsive to both force apart as well as growth signals. If you look at the bone as living dynamic tissue, the area around the sutures (and especially the interdigitated area) would be a more flexible and less dense segment of bone. Ripe for remodeling.

We breathe multiple times per minute. What if, with every breath, we were causing the flexion and extension of the sutures - multiple oscillations per minute, to all sutures, demineralizing them and making them pliable again?

I think this is actually one of the natural functions of the breath: To drive the craniosacral motion. When the breathing pattern becomes pathological, you have sutures that jam up and improper craniofacial growth.

My project and practice will be to retrain the breathing (actually, to untrain and unlearn all of the compensation patterns that prevent your natural breath) so that it can resume its natural function of driving the craniosacral motion and keeping the bones of the skull pliable.

Most importantly, the cranial base and SBJ. Getting the foundation moving again should start unlocking everything else.

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Topic starter Posted : 27/06/2021 11:23 pm
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Posted by: @admin

I think everyone would be familiar with the concept of flexing something back and forth repeatedly until it becomes pliable so that you can actually break it apart. Like a thick piece of cardboard or even a piece of aluminum like a paperclip - you bend it back and forth until the material getting bent softens enough to actually snap off.

Studies show that bone/sutures respond very well to oscillating force rather than continuous force (Alt-RAMEC, this will be the topic of my next video. Example article: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19216603/)

Even these studies fall far short of my proposal, however, as they oscillation/alternation is happening every few days at best, weeks at most. Even then, they show significant improvement in growth over static force.

Restoration of cranial rhythm would mean that the sutures return to a state of flexing, causing the deminalization and keeping them nice and pliable and responsive to both force apart as well as growth signals. If you look at the bone as living dynamic tissue, the area around the sutures (and especially the interdigitated area) would be a more flexible and less dense segment of bone. Ripe for remodeling.

We breathe multiple times per minute. What if, with every breath, we were causing the flexion and extension of the sutures - multiple oscillations per minute, to all sutures, demineralizing them and making them pliable again?

I think this is actually one of the natural functions of the breath: To drive the craniosacral motion. When the breathing pattern becomes pathological, you have sutures that jam up and improper craniofacial growth.

My project and practice will be to retrain the breathing (actually, to untrain and unlearn all of the compensation patterns that prevent your natural breath) so that it can resume its natural function of driving the craniosacral motion and keeping the bones of the skull pliable.

Most importantly, the cranial base and SBJ. Getting the foundation moving again should start unlocking everything else.

I like your analogy of weakening a piece of metal by bending it back and forth until it breaks. I tried several weeks cycling between backward and forward turns after completing my initial MSE expansion. I can’t say if it helped or not, but I still think I’m getting some very slight forward advancement from reverse pull headgear after the window for its efficacy is typically thought to lapse. I have wondered since improvements to craniofacial form improves breathing if the reverse could also be true and improvements to breathing could improve craniofacial form. I’ve tried buteyko exercises and using a modified frolov device, but haven’t been consistent enough to correlate it with progress in my expansion. It’s interesting that these practices try to lower the respiratory rate, which would reduce the bending back and forth in your analogy, but maybe it’s about the quality of the breaths over the quantity. My osteopath always instructs me to breathe deeply and diaphragmatically during manipulations. I’ll be curious to see how you suggest “retraining” our breathing.

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Posted : 28/06/2021 11:12 pm