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Rotation of chewing and possible correlation to canted smile

Sclera
(@sclera)
200+ Forum Posts

@apollo and @allixa, I thought this was a really interesting concept and found that I was getting lost in the original post, so I made a new thread to answer your questions about chewing and canted smiles.

 

Posted by: Apollo
Posted by: Sclera

@progress Very interesting! Yes, my jaw still moves back and forth as well as up and down, though the motion is not nearly as circular as it is with CMC. I feel like my face is wide, given my proportions, but very short, so I do believe that there's just not a lot of room in my mouth. I am very curious about what changes may occur as my palate widens.

I've been trying to be more conscious of the mechanics of my chewing. The best I can tell, my default motion involves some slight counterclockwise rotation, resulting in a grinding motion going slightly right to left (and maybe a little front to back) across my teeth. This is easier to discern with a bolus of gum on both sides of my mouth. When I try to reverse directions (left to right) it feels strange, like interlacing your fingers with the counterintuitive thumb on top. I wonder if this contributes to my occlusal cant with my right side lower than the left. Today I tried to do all of my chewing exercises with a clockwise motion. Does your chewing rotation have a habitual orientation? How does it relate to your plane of occlusion? 

My right side is also lower than my left, and I chew counter-clockwise by default -- which I have never thought of before. You can also see a distinct difference in my canines. My left canine looks much more worn down than my right.

My right ramus is also significantly lower than my left.

Posted by: Allixa
Posted by: Apollo

I've been trying to be more conscious of the mechanics of my chewing. The best I can tell, my default motion involves some slight counterclockwise rotation, resulting in a grinding motion going slightly right to left (and maybe a little front to back) across my teeth. This is easier to discern with a bolus of gum on both sides of my mouth. When I try to reverse directions (left to right) it feels strange, like interlacing your fingers with the counterintuitive thumb on top. I wonder if this contributes to my occlusal cant with my right side lower than the left. Today I tried to do all of my chewing exercises with a clockwise motion. Does your chewing rotation have a habitual orientation? How does it relate to your plane of occlusion? 

I'm going back through my old pictures now. There was a time when I used to do all my chewing on the right side of my mouth. Sure enough, looking at pictures from that time, my teeth are canted with the right side being higher and the left side lower, and the right side is more expanded as well. So there is definitely a connection between chewing patterns and smile tilt. It looks like in my case the side that did more chewing was pushed up higher and was more expanded just from absorbing more of the lower jaw forces. Does that hold true in your case as well?

As for the circular motion of the lower jaw, that's actually something that myofunctional therapists concentrate on with young patients. They call it 'rotary chewing' and they stress that it should be balanced and able to happen in both directions on both sides. Perhaps evening your chewing motion out or trying to balance it with both sides and directions will help level your smile over time.

 This has me hopeful that there might be some effect on correcting my asymmetry in this regard. I have been hoping to even out my ramus length.

To give some more data:

  • Left side of face: teeth are higher than the right, less expansion of teeth, higher vaulted palate, shorter ramus length, weaker jawline, higher nostril, higher eye corner, higher eyebrow
  • Right side of face: teeth are lower than the left, better arch of teeth, flatter palate, longer ramus, tighter jawline, lower nostril, lower eye corner, lower shoulder

Some of this may be due to my mild scoliosis pulling my right shoulder down. I have had immense improvement in posture and overall symmetry, but haven't had much hope for my cant.

I chewed today clockwise, and felt new sensations, which are really encouraging to me. I'm going to try to practice making sure that I even out and am conscious in that regard.

If nothing else, my endeavor has been for balance, and this would certainly help in that regard.

EDIT: @allixa, I should also answer that I'm not positive on which side I've chewed more on, if I have at all. When I clenched my teeth, my left/higher/weaker-jawline side was affected more, so I chewed more on my right/lower/tighter-jawline side, but that was a temporary thing, and I can't tell you for how long. I wish I had kept track. But I'm fairly certain I've been chewing counter-clockwise this entire time, whether or not I chewed food evenly throughout the sides of my bite.

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Topic starter Posted : 19/03/2018 5:01 am
Apollo liked
Sclera
(@sclera)
200+ Forum Posts

And also -- I need to completely revise something as I just had dinner and paid attention to my rotation - when I chew gum it is entirely counter-clockwise no matter what side of my mouth I chew on. When I ate dinner today, I instinctively changed to clockwise on my left side and then counter-clockwise on my right, and chewed on both sides evenly.

Something about chewing gum triggers clicking in my jaw when I chew clockwise, which I think created the muscle memory. Anyway, I'm going to start consciously but carefully incorporating clockwise hard chewing and see what happens. Really weird.

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Topic starter Posted : 19/03/2018 6:39 am
Meltcel
 Meltcel
(@Meltcel)
Guest

I always chewed on my right side and of course I experience the same as you guys.

And of course I figured this was why my right side was higher and wider. It's great to see all of you finding out the same things I was only guessing. 

 

My left incisors and canines are also tipped inwards. I asked my ortho why this was and all he could offer was a "Eh that's how life is" kind of answer.

 

I kind of feel like orthodontics was the most pointless paid endeavor I ever took on. 

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Posted : 19/03/2018 9:27 am
Angelina
(@madeira09)
10+ Forum Posts

Hi, guys. i always chewed on my right side, but i cant decide which side of my face is higher. on photos i like my left side, it looks better.. i used to think that my  upper dental midline is shifted to the left a little, but now i think its just that my right side is more tense and muscles there are shorter, i can feel it on the right side of my mouth, especially anguli oris muscle .this is weird..  i realized that when i chew on my left side i chew with my teeth closer to wisdoms (3rd molar?) but when i chew on my right side i tend to use premolars. now i try to chew with my molars,altough its difficult to do when i chew on my right side.also its harder to keep my lips closed when using molars. i think it helps because i feel that anguli oris muscle almost doesnt get contracted and lips stay relaxed like on my left side. i hope it will fix my asymmetry  

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Posted : 19/03/2018 7:02 pm
Progress
(@progress)
500+ Forum Posts

Great to hear. Have you thought of incorporating static clockwise bite to your mewing? Intentionally activating the weaker direction/side of the masseters/temporalis/neck mastoids etc should allow your head to find a new more neutral position, possibly encouraging the skull to return to its original symmetry. Well, that's what I will be doing now that your anecdote confirmed some things for me.

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Posted : 19/03/2018 7:28 pm
Sclera liked
Angelina
(@madeira09)
10+ Forum Posts

 i didnt think about it. im trying to do it now but its hard to control.. by default my mandible rotates clockwise when chewing on my left and opposite on my right side. 

 

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Posted : 19/03/2018 7:58 pm
Sclera
(@sclera)
200+ Forum Posts

@madeira09 Have you considered open-mouth chewing? I've seen a lot of benefit to it, including my anguli oris. I still closed-mouth chew in social settings, but OMC alone.

Muscle tension is absolutely a part of asymmetry, and I've been trying to correct the asymmetry in my body with hope that it will help adjust all the way up. I had a posture analysis done, and sure enough, my misalignment begins with my ankles and kind of zig-zags up my body.

I'm being mindful now to chew clockwise and counterclockwise equally on both sides of my mouth. My right/higher/weaker-jaw side was VERY sore. I'm really excited to keep this going.

@meltcel Oddly enough, my right side is lower than my left, even though in the grand scheme of things I've probably been using that more to chew. And since I'm doing a lot of things all at once, I'm not sure I'll ever know what exactly corrects what. But jumps in progress are encouraging. I keep coming to the thought that it's a combination of things, at least for me, and correcting many areas will benefit the whole.

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Topic starter Posted : 19/03/2018 8:10 pm
Angelina
(@madeira09)
10+ Forum Posts

yeah, i do the same, i even OMC in social setting sometimes 🙂 but i noticed its kinda hard to keep mouth shut when using molars for chewing.take  a look at this girl https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmFJXFhPgq  

i have a mild scoliosis too (right thoracic), i work on it too, i think its all connected..

glad for you,keep going, hope it will work the best 🙂

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Posted : 19/03/2018 8:19 pm
Sclera liked
Sclera
(@sclera)
200+ Forum Posts
Posted by: Progress

Great to hear. Have you thought of incorporating static clockwise bite to your mewing? Intentionally activating the weaker direction/side of the masseters/temporalis/neck mastoids etc should allow your head to find a new more neutral position, possibly encouraging the skull to return to its original symmetry. Well, that's what I will be doing now that your anecdote confirmed some things for me.

Yes I have, but I am somewhat at a loss for which side needs the activation. I battle between my left side, which though has higher features, has the more narrow palate and the weaker jawline. On the other hand my right side is being pulled down, most likely because of my right shoulder drop.  I'm going to spend a bit more time on the chewing, and see if any changes take place and where, and then experiment on my bite.

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Topic starter Posted : 20/03/2018 12:10 am
Sclera
(@sclera)
200+ Forum Posts
Posted by: madeira09

yeah, i do the same, i even OMC in social setting sometimes 🙂 but i noticed its kinda hard to keep mouth shut when using molars for chewing.take  a look at this girl https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmFJXFhPgq  

i have a mild scoliosis too (right thoracic), i work on it too, i think its all connected..

glad for you,keep going, hope it will work the best 🙂

Unfortunately it said the video was unavailable!

I have a much easier time working on the rotation of my bite while chewing gum. It feels completely foreign to me with food, almost impossible, but we'll see!

 

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Topic starter Posted : 20/03/2018 12:12 am
Apollo
(@apollo)
500+ Forum Posts
Posted by: Sclera

 

I'm being mindful now to chew clockwise and counterclockwise equally on both sides of my mouth. My right/higher/weaker-jaw side was VERY sore. I'm really excited to keep this going.

I'm excited to keep experimenting with this too! It feels pretty revelatory to practice chewing with the counterintuitive rotation.  I had been trying to develop better mindfulness about my chewing mechanics for a while, but your posts drawing a distinction between the circular and the up and down components in the other thread helped me formalize in my mind exactly how the direction of rotation might relate to my occlusal cant. Some people are talking about which side of their mouth they hold the bolus of food on when they chew. That's what I was focusing on initially, and it could be a factor, but for me the direction of rotation is much more habitually ingrained.

Posted by: Sclera
 
I have a much easier time working on the rotation of my bite while chewing gum. It feels completely foreign to me with food, almost impossible, but we'll see! 

I tried to chew all of my lunch today in the clockwise direction and it required consistent attention or I revered back to my old counterclockwise habit. 

Posted by: Progress

Great to hear. Have you thought of incorporating static clockwise bite to your mewing? Intentionally activating the weaker direction/side of the masseters/temporalis/neck mastoids etc should allow your head to find a new more neutral position, possibly encouraging the skull to return to its original symmetry. Well, that's what I will be doing now that your anecdote confirmed some things for me.

This is also intriguing. Just to clarify that I understand what you are saying, since my default chewing is counterclockwise with the grinding component of the chew motion moving right to left, I have a tendency to clench my jaw in the position where the mandibular teeth are pushing up and to the left against the maxillary teeth, essentially at the apex of this rotary chewing motion. I'm pretty good at keeping my teeth in light contact while awake, but sometimes I clench or even grind my teeth during sleep (and I assume that I do this in my habitual direction). So what you are proposing is to deliberately reverse that set point while awake, and apply more than Mew's "butterfly touch" level pressure at the apex of a right-to-left chewing motion (in my case). This is definitely worth trying but could promote clenching/bruxism issues during sleep, so we should be careful to ensure that the resting muscle tone of the tongue is adequately developed to serve as a check.

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Posted : 20/03/2018 1:18 am
Angelina
(@madeira09)
10+ Forum Posts
Posted by: Sclera
Posted by: madeira09

yeah, i do the same, i even OMC in social setting sometimes 🙂 but i noticed its kinda hard to keep mouth shut when using molars for chewing.take  a look at this girl https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmFJXFhPgq  

i have a mild scoliosis too (right thoracic), i work on it too, i think its all connected..

glad for you,keep going, hope it will work the best 🙂

Unfortunately it said the video was unavailable!

I have a much easier time working on the rotation of my bite while chewing gum. It feels completely foreign to me with food, almost impossible, but we'll see!

 

there's a girl Romee from VS angels, she's having lunch with her bf,  she's chewing with her mouth open, maybe for most of those who have good facial structure like she does OPC is natural, also i think she chews with her molars mostly, but cant say for sure of course )

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Posted : 20/03/2018 1:59 am
Allixa
(@allixa)
200+ Forum Posts

I found the video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmFJXFhPgqA

I see OMC, but also that her swallowing technique is not great. She also doesn't seem to chew much overall. The guy sitting next to her with the worse face aesthetics seems to do CMC.

Here's one of the comments on the video:

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Posted : 20/03/2018 7:56 am
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Greensmoothies
(@greensmoothies)
200+ Forum Posts

Great idea! I also have a canted smile and jaw asymmetry. Yesterday I began to chew with the opposite rotation... At first it felt so weird, then quickly thereafter it's just how I chew now, without thinking about it. This makes a lot of sense!

Btw I recall from a Starecta and Mew interview there was mention that if one eye is bigger, chew on the opposite side. Thoughts on this? Not sure what side to chew on if one eye is higher than the other? Having difficulty understanding my asymmetry and how to resolve it, which makes me eye a myobrace even more

And yeah, going to OMC for everything now

Remember this pain... and let it activate you.

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Posted : 21/03/2018 5:18 am
Apollo
(@apollo)
500+ Forum Posts
Posted by: Greensmoothies

Great idea! I also have a canted smile and jaw asymmetry. Yesterday I began to chew with the opposite rotation... At first it felt so weird, then quickly thereafter it's just how I chew now, without thinking about it. This makes a lot of sense!

 

It took a couple days for me to adapt, but now it feels more natural chewing in my counterintuative direction too. I still haven't figured out how to informally balance out interchanging between directions. Should I alternate one bite clockwise and the next counterclockwise, or a few bites clockwise and then a few bites counterclockwise, or one meal clockwise and then the next meal counterclockwise. Maybe I should always chew clockwise when I have the food on the left side of my mouth and chew counterclockwise when I have the food on the right side of my mouth. Surely I shouldn't be obsessing over the details and unconciously it should somehow roughly balance out. For now I'm going to favor my counterintuative direction and see if it helps correct my occlusal cant.

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Posted : 21/03/2018 7:12 am
Greensmoothies
(@greensmoothies)
200+ Forum Posts
Posted by: Apollo
Posted by: Greensmoothies

Great idea! I also have a canted smile and jaw asymmetry. Yesterday I began to chew with the opposite rotation... At first it felt so weird, then quickly thereafter it's just how I chew now, without thinking about it. This makes a lot of sense!

 

It took a couple days for me to adapt, but now it feels more natural chewing in my counterintuative direction too. I still haven't figured out how to informally balance out interchanging between directions. Should I alternate one bite clockwise and the next counterclockwise, or a few bites clockwise and then a few bites counterclockwise, or one meal clockwise and then the next meal counterclockwise. Maybe I should always chew clockwise when I have the food on the left side of my mouth and chew counterclockwise when I have the food on the right side of my mouth. Surely I shouldn't be obsessing over the details and unconciously it should somehow roughly balance out. For now I'm going to favor my counterintuative direction and see if it helps correct my occlusal cant.

I'm doing the same thing as well, going to chew in this new direction and OMC, after a while and noticing a change I'll switch it up

Also, never noticed this before, but my husband is also an OMC-er, possibly didn't notice before because it doesn't even look that bad. My husband doesn't have any issues with his face, posture etc, perhaps this is one thing contributing there. So far a bit clumsy with the OMC, looking to my husband as an example/ideal to attain there

Remember this pain... and let it activate you.

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Posted : 21/03/2018 11:36 am
Sclera
(@sclera)
200+ Forum Posts
Posted by: Greensmoothies

Great idea! I also have a canted smile and jaw asymmetry. Yesterday I began to chew with the opposite rotation... At first it felt so weird, then quickly thereafter it's just how I chew now, without thinking about it. This makes a lot of sense!

Btw I recall from a Starecta and Mew interview there was mention that if one eye is bigger, chew on the opposite side. Thoughts on this? Not sure what side to chew on if one eye is higher than the other? Having difficulty understanding my asymmetry and how to resolve it, which makes me eye a myobrace even more

And yeah, going to OMC for everything now

 I've been thinking about this, too! When I smile, one eye has a bigger "puff" than the other under it, and I wonder if there's something related. But I can't tell if working the muscles on the same side minimizes the puff or makes it larger. I have an appt with a myofunctional therapist soon and this is one thing I'll ask.

 
 
Posted by: Greensmoothies
Posted by: Apollo
Posted by: Greensmoothies

Great idea! I also have a canted smile and jaw asymmetry. Yesterday I began to chew with the opposite rotation... At first it felt so weird, then quickly thereafter it's just how I chew now, without thinking about it. This makes a lot of sense!

It took a couple days for me to adapt, but now it feels more natural chewing in my counterintuative direction too. I still haven't figured out how to informally balance out interchanging between directions. Should I alternate one bite clockwise and the next counterclockwise, or a few bites clockwise and then a few bites counterclockwise, or one meal clockwise and then the next meal counterclockwise. Maybe I should always chew clockwise when I have the food on the left side of my mouth and chew counterclockwise when I have the food on the right side of my mouth. Surely I shouldn't be obsessing over the details and unconciously it should somehow roughly balance out. For now I'm going to favor my counterintuative direction and see if it helps correct my occlusal cant.

I'm doing the same thing as well, going to chew in this new direction and OMC, after a while and noticing a change I'll switch it up

Also, never noticed this before, but my husband is also an OMC-er, possibly didn't notice before because it doesn't even look that bad. My husband doesn't have any issues with his face, posture etc, perhaps this is one thing contributing there. So far a bit clumsy with the OMC, looking to my husband as an example/ideal to attain there

It's become pretty natural to switch when I hard chew "gum", and it's slowly getting easier as I eat real food.  I try to be as even as possible. One side I'll chew clockwise then counter clockwise, then switch to the other. My theory is that the muscles that need more work will catch up. I don't want to create an imbalance in the other direction.

@greensmoothies - That's a great idea! I've been talking to my boyfriend, and picking his brain on his own habits since he has great structure too (already learned he keeps his tongue on the roof, and fixed teeth issues by himself when he was a kid). I need to dive in more on the chewing with him, and report back!

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Topic starter Posted : 21/03/2018 8:16 pm
Progress
(@progress)
500+ Forum Posts

Facial muscles of the structurally weaker side will have to compensate by working harder. Puff sounds just like that: hypertrophied muscle unsupported by bone. Additionally, if chewing and emotional expression feels difficult on one side/direction of the face, that side of face isn't sufficiently posturally anchored to tongue, neck and shoulders. I doubt you just spontanenously began chewing asymmetrically at some point. You did so because your asymmetrical posture 1) allowed 2) enforced that pattern of movement.

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Posted : 21/03/2018 8:33 pm
Sclera and Angelina liked
Apollo
(@apollo)
500+ Forum Posts

I've noticed that my mandibular teeth are tilted inward more on my left side than my right. I think this could also be a result of always having chewed in a counterclockwise direction. With the grinding motion going right to left, the upper teeth would apply force tipping the lower teeth inward on the left side. 

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Posted : 22/03/2018 1:09 am
Progress
(@progress)
500+ Forum Posts

@apollo Which one of these better describes the one-sided chewing motion you are talking about? Do you explicitly rotate the jaw in circles, or linearly grind it back and forth?

 

 (Ahh one of the arrows in the circle points the wrong way)

And when you bite, in which direction are you allowing the force to transfer?

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted : 22/03/2018 1:40 am
Apollo
(@apollo)
500+ Forum Posts
Posted by: Progress

@apollo Which one of these better describes the one-sided chewing motion you are talking about? Do you explicitly rotate the jaw in circles, or linearly grind it back and forth?

I'm not chewing cud like a cow. The rotational element of mature human chewing is subtle. The lateral movements of the cycle are a matter of millimeters. Here's a video with an animation of a skull that shows a normal human chewing pattern (  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZKSnGRNnKY ). This is what I have always done. The mechanics of my chewing is normal. It's just that I recently realized that I have always defaulted to one direction rather than alternating the direction of rotation. It's not "one-sided" since I hold the food on either or both sides of my mouth. It's "one directional." The steps of the normal mastication cycle: 

1) You bring the mandible up until the teeth make contact.

2) You grind the mandibular teeth across the maxillary teeth from one side toward the other and maybe slightly forward, reaching the "apex" of the cycle with the maximum jaw pressure on the opposite side of the teeth from where you initiated contact.

3) You  separate your teeth.

4) You move your mandible back to the starting position.

So these steps can be done in a "clockwise" or "counterclockwise" orientation. If clockwise, step 2 moves in a left to right direction. If counterclockwise, step 2 moves in a right to left direction. Step 4 moves in the opposite direction from step 2. I have always gone counterclockwise. This means that during step 2, the teeth on the right side of my mouth make contact on the buccal side and grind toward the lingual side and the teeth on the left side of my mouth make contact on the lingual side and grind toward the buccal side. So the force of the mandible at the "apex" pushes up and to the left. This means that the reciprocal force of the maxillary teeth down on the mandibular teeth pushes down and to the right. I suspect this has the effect of canting the left side of my mouth above the level of the right side of my mouth and tipping the lower teeth on the left side of my mouth to the lingual side more than the teeth on the right side of my mouth.

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Posted : 22/03/2018 2:32 am
Progress
(@progress)
500+ Forum Posts

Yes, I see. I'm not questioning your chewing technique, but inquiring into it in an attempt to understand my own. It doesn't seem clear whether asymmetric chewing is a cause or a consequence (or varyingly either/neither) of skeletal asymmetry. Looking forward to hearing how your situation turns out.

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Posted : 22/03/2018 5:39 am
Apollo
(@apollo)
500+ Forum Posts
Posted by: Progress

Yes, I see. I'm not questioning your chewing technique, but inquiring into it in an attempt to understand my own. It doesn't seem clear whether asymmetric chewing is a cause or a consequence (or varyingly either/neither) of skeletal asymmetry. Looking forward to hearing how your situation turns out.

Does the "rotation" of your chewing look like the animation in the video? I agree that there could be a chicken-or-egg phenomenon going on. It's easier for the force of the mandible pushing up to go with the direction of the cant than against it. So since my occlusal plane is higher on the left, it's easier to grind in a right to left (counterclockwise) direction. It's possible I have just always done it that way because it feels easier. When I switch and chew with a clockwise rotation, it feels like I am working against the cant, but that also makes me feel like it might help correct the asymmetry.

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Posted : 22/03/2018 6:47 am
Apollo
(@apollo)
500+ Forum Posts
Posted by: Sclera

I have a much easier time working on the rotation of my bite while chewing gum. It feels completely foreign to me with food, almost impossible, but we'll see!

I think the reason it is easier to chew with gum than food in the direction that goes against my occlusal cant is that the thickness of the gum makes up for the difference in height between the two sides of my mouth, whereas the food gets ground down to nothing. If you let yourself chew in the intuitive direction, your teeth make contact on the side of the teeth that is canted lower and then grind in the direction that is canted higher. I think this is also the reason why it is easier to practice the counter-intuitive direction if I put the bolus on the higher side of my mouth.

 

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Posted : 24/03/2018 12:33 am
Sclera
(@sclera)
200+ Forum Posts

@apollo -- That makes a lot of sense to me. It's slowly been getting easier. Very surprisingly, in a short amount of time, I am seeing a remarkable tightening in my jawline. Every day I'm more encouraged by the results than I was before. I'm really looking forward to seeing if there are any results in a month or two.

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Topic starter Posted : 24/03/2018 4:34 am
Apollo liked
Progress
(@progress)
500+ Forum Posts
Posted by: Apollo
Posted by: Progress

Yes, I see. I'm not questioning your chewing technique, but inquiring into it in an attempt to understand my own. It doesn't seem clear whether asymmetric chewing is a cause or a consequence (or varyingly either/neither) of skeletal asymmetry. Looking forward to hearing how your situation turns out.

Does the "rotation" of your chewing look like the animation in the video? I agree that there could be a chicken-or-egg phenomenon going on. It's easier for the force of the mandible pushing up to go with the direction of the cant than against it. So since my occlusal plane is higher on the left, it's easier to grind in a right to left (counterclockwise) direction. It's possible I have just always done it that way because it feels easier. When I switch and chew with a clockwise rotation, it feels like I am working against the cant, but that also makes me feel like it might help correct the asymmetry.

Hard to say. My chewing is more like an angular pulse than a rotation... which may be caused by lacking anterior palatal growth. 

I have found that the way my jaws make contact during  both chewing and rest is directly influenced by how my head/shoulder area is positioned in relation to each other. If  bite is asymmetric, chewing with truly neutral head tilt may feel wrong. You should be able to consciously "untilt" your mandible by engaing the musculature of neck and trapezius, because temporalis and masseter share fascia with them. It took me long to notice that every time I ate I was allowing my posture to twist back to the level of imbalance determined by my current occlusion.  Open mouth chewers are probably countering this intuitively.

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Posted : 25/03/2018 10:53 pm
Apollo liked

THE GREAT WORK