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Questions on the effects of chewing gum on facial bone remodelling: is it feasible?

LG16
 LG16
(@lg16)
New Member

Hi,

I’ve been doing some research into the effects of chewing hard gum (mastic) on developing the facial bones. I’ve found it difficult to get a conclusive answer, though.

Basically, I’m wondering if purposeful hard chewing can change the gonial angle and ramus length over time in adults. Considering how bruxism patient’s jaws alter — and from what I’ve read on here — I presume it’s possible? But there seem to be many skeptics also so I’m not sure. 

From what I’ve read, the potential for bone remodelling has something to do with masseter hypertrophy. Can anyone shed some light on the mechanisms for actually achieving such a change, and if it’s a feasible goal with consistent chewing of hard gum?

I’ve always wanted a stronger jawline and was wondering whether this could help in some capacity. 

Many thanks!

Quote
Topic starter Posted : 14/06/2022 2:43 am
TGW
 TGW
(@admin)
Admin

Bone deposition happens due to the pulling / tugging force of the muscles. See point "m" in this picture? That's the mastoid process, on the temporal bone. In a baby it virtually doesn't exist, but it's "pulled" into existence by the tug of the muscles upon that section of the skull. The SCMs specifically, which we use in our breathing method to tug the temporal bones.

Every bony part of the body has these ridges / grooves / protrusions of bone where the muscle tugs against it for long enough.

This is because when tension / force is put on bone, a piezoelectric charge signals osteoblasts to put down new bone and osteoclasts to eat away at bone in accordance to what the forces being exerted require. More masseter activation / stronger masseter and jaw muscles would have this expansion force on the mandible.

Alternatively, the breathing rhythm would also have this tugging effect from the suprahyoid / floor of mouth muscles

image
image

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/06/2022 8:45 pm
LG16 liked
LG16
 LG16
(@lg16)
New Member
Posted by: @admin

Bone deposition happens due to the pulling / tugging force of the muscles. See point "m" in this picture? That's the mastoid process, on the temporal bone. In a baby it virtually doesn't exist, but it's "pulled" into existence by the tug of the muscles upon that section of the skull. The SCMs specifically, which we use in our breathing method to tug the temporal bones.

Every bony part of the body has these ridges / grooves / protrusions of bone where the muscle tugs against it for long enough.

This is because when tension / force is put on bone, a piezoelectric charge signals osteoblasts to put down new bone and osteoclasts to eat away at bone in accordance to what the forces being exerted require. More masseter activation / stronger masseter and jaw muscles would have this expansion force on the mandible.

Alternatively, the breathing rhythm would also have this tugging effect from the suprahyoid / floor of mouth muscles

image
image

 

Very interesting, thank you. I have just come across the thread on masseter vs temporal chewing patterns, and what you provided above was discussed quite a lot.

It seems pretty complicated, and the more I read the more I realise I don’t know/understand.

I’m getting a genioplasty soon to fix my recessed chin. My Gonial angle is in the 130 region, which isn’t too bad as I understand it. My issues are not severe enough to qualify for jaw surgery, nor do they cause any breathing or bite issues, but I’ve gone down somewhat of a rabbit hole after discovering the subject of proper young posture and the possibilities of influencing facial bone changes. 

That said, purposeful hard chewing to achieve a positive change seems very complex just as a stand alone topic; having read through that four page thread, I’m still unsure as to whether chewing sessions like this would positively or negatively effect my face. 

From what I can tell, chewing this way should result in a longer ramus, shorter gonial angle, and shorter mid face (increased facial height to width ratio), which would all be positive changes. But then there are also those that suggest doing this could result in a recessed maxilla and even a more prominent nose. 

Is there a consensus on whether someone like me should peruse this?

 

Thanks!

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 16/06/2022 4:06 am

THE GREAT WORK

Warning:
Your Cranial Sutures Need To Be open for CranioSacral / Jaw Development!