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Pushing up against the suture/ridge in the mouth vs pushing out against the molars?  

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zegtv
(@zegtv)
New Member

When I push the tongue hard against the middle of the palate where the ridge of the suture is I can feel the pressure radiating into my face. Like, a lot. A LOT

When I do this my tongue edges are just sitting on the ridges above my molars. Alternatively I can apply sideways pressure to try to push the molars out effectively, but I don't feel much while doing this (although I think I'm applying quite a bit of force properly). I can pretty much split my tongues power between the two.

I'm starting to think that maybe pushing up on the suture induces expansion just as much as pushing out? It stimulates growth there. I do not think kids and babies push outward with their tongue - they just push up on that suture and cause it to spread out as a result of stimulation. I'm feeling less and less inclined to push my molars out than I feel I should just focus on my tongue being hard against the middle suture

IDK if anyone else has this "Feature", but my suture isn't flat. It's a mound which divides my upper palate into two sections

 

Thanks for any insights!

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Posted : 05/01/2018 12:37 pm
Apollo
(@apollo)
Reputable Member

I also have a torus palatinus ridge on the roof of my mouth. Mine is asymmetrical. It is more prominent on the right side to which my dental midline is deviated by a few mm. When I push up with my tongue, I feel pressure along the alveolar ridge, especially on my left side which is closer to the midline. My tongue is flush with the roof of my mouth, but I think I would feel more force near that central suture if my palate wasn't so vaulted.

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Posted : 05/01/2018 2:37 pm
Angelina
(@angelina)
New Member

I undestand what you are talking about, same thing for me, i think we just have to focus on the tongue being up in the middle and sides would then widen automatically.. but im still a little confused about this.. there's a printscreen of dr.Mike's video on youtube, heres the girl with her tongue being pushed hard against the palate. when i look at the picture i try to imagine my tongue to be placed like hers so when i push sideways like you did i kinda feel that it wouldnt be quite right, my tongue would be then more like flat while her tongue is a little rounded, right? but im still not sure maybe im wrong, maybe someone will clear this out? 

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Posted : 05/01/2018 2:51 pm
Apollo
(@apollo)
Reputable Member
Posted by: Apollo

I also have a torus palatinus ridge on the roof of my mouth. Mine is asymmetrical. It is more prominent on the right side to which my dental midline is deviated by a few mm. When I push up with my tongue, I feel pressure along the alveolar ridge, especially on my left side which is closer to the midline. My tongue is flush with the roof of my mouth, but I think I would feel more force near that central suture if my palate wasn't so vaulted.

When I say that I feel the pressure most along the alveolar ridge, I mean the ridge of the maxilla beside the teeth, not the central ridge "torus palatinus" around my palatal midline. I think what zegtv and Angelina are saying is correct, that to move the maxilla up and forward with the force of the tongue, it probably needs to be firmly engaging in the middle of the palate, but because my palate is still relatively narrow, I end up feeling the pressure most around the edges. Hopefully, if I can get some expansion, I'll have more tongue space that will better distribute the force across a less-vaulted palate. So I imagine that those with narrow palates might initially feel more pressure around the edges when they press up with their tongue while their palate is expanding, but that this would transition to spread the force across the palate when there is adequate tongue space and begin to move the maxilla up and forward.

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Posted : 05/01/2018 5:32 pm
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As you undergo correction in the near future, please consider keeping records for your own sake and for others. Pictures of dental impressions, scans, medical reports reports can be very helpful even with all personally identifying information blocked out.

Your input could help many, many people

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