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Pillows and neck posture  

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AlphaMinus
(@alphaminus)
Trusted Member

I recently switched to sleeping on my back after years of being a side sleeper. I find that I stay in that position all night and don't wake up, which is a good sign for me. I'm not rolling onto my side.

Past couple of nights I've tried ditching my pillow too. I only used a small buckwheat one, but figured I'd see if I could do without it.  To my surprise I was totally comfortable and woke up the same way. I had expected to wake up and find my pillow under my head, but it wasn't the case.  

So now I'm trying to get a definite answer on whether sleeping like this is beneficial or detrimental. Googling around it seems like opinion is firmly split. Some say it's the most natural way to sleep and helps correct the neck, others say it's bad for the neck and can result in stomach acids working their way up to the esophagus.

 

Does anyone have any insight about this? I seem to be doing ok with it now but don't want to develop any problems going forward, especially as I'm doing my best to work on my neck posture. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 30/12/2018 5:23 pm
Progress
(@progress)
Member Moderator

A posture that improves your sleep is bound to be beneficial for you. As long as you are active during the day, 7-9 hours of sleep in sub-ideal posture is not enough to be anatomically detrimental. Your body will naturally loosen up during the first few hours of being awake. If you can keep your mouth shut, avoid apnea and never wake up in pain, you are well off.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 30/12/2018 6:49 pm
rikkirose
(@rikkirose)
New Member

I also came across different opinions on this. I asked a few experts, and all have different versions. What I realized for myself was that the head should be above the body for the blood to flow. And I sleep on my back. And  also need to sleep on an orthopedic pillow. I recently acquired one here http://pregily.com/orthopedic-pillows/  , and my neck began to feel much better.

This post was modified 6 days ago by rikkirose
ReplyQuote
Posted : 11/01/2019 5:09 pm
Odys
 Odys
(@odys)
Eminent Member

Lie on your side. Feel whether your tongue is still central in your palate. Mine isn’t either side. This would likely increase when I slept if the tongue relaxed. The effect of this would even out if you switch sides in the course of the night and don’t have a favoured side. I favour my left side strongly. In fact I find it very difficult to fall asleep other than lying on my left side. Also consider where the pressure of the pillow falls. Is it on the side of the jaw or only higher up on the head? Such pressure on the jaw can put the mandible slightly askew. It is also considerably more than the usual inward pressure of the cheeks, which absent the outward pressure of the  tongue is what has moved our teeth in and why we are here. These effects are very slight but over time they make a difference. This work is as much about removing hindrances, in habit and posture, as it is about putting in effort with the tongue.

Lying on your side is a good idea for those who are learning to keep their mouths shut and breathe through their nose through the night. However, the ultimate goal should be to sleep as you do. I am envious that you have managed this. I consider that my failure to has slowed my progress considerably. Did you just do it? Or did you need tactics to achieve it? If so please share them.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 11/01/2019 7:52 pm
AlphaMinus
(@alphaminus)
Trusted Member
Posted by: Progress

A posture that improves your sleep is bound to be beneficial for you. As long as you are active during the day, 7-9 hours of sleep in sub-ideal posture is not enough to be anatomically detrimental. Your body will naturally loosen up during the first few hours of being awake. If you can keep your mouth shut, avoid apnea and never wake up in pain, you are well off.

I don't have apnea or wake up in pain, however I'm wondering if one sleeping position has more benefits than the other. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/01/2019 1:04 pm
AlphaMinus
(@alphaminus)
Trusted Member
Posted by: rikkirose

I also came across different opinions on this. I asked a few experts, and all have different versions. What I realized for myself was that the head should be above the body for the blood to flow. And I sleep on my back. And  also need to sleep on an orthopedic pillow. I recently acquired one, and my neck began to feel much better.

I've tried all kinds of pillows and still ended up with neck problems. I'm hoping no pillow is my solution!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/01/2019 1:05 pm
AlphaMinus
(@alphaminus)
Trusted Member
Posted by: Odys

Lie on your side. Feel whether your tongue is still central in your palate. Mine isn’t either side. This would likely increase when I slept if the tongue relaxed. The effect of this would even out if you switch sides in the course of the night and don’t have a favoured side. I favour my left side strongly. In fact I find it very difficult to fall asleep other than lying on my left side. Also consider where the pressure of the pillow falls. Is it on the side of the jaw or only higher up on the head? Such pressure on the jaw can put the mandible slightly askew. It is also considerably more than the usual inward pressure of the cheeks, which absent the outward pressure of the  tongue is what has moved our teeth in and why we are here. These effects are very slight but over time they make a difference. This work is as much about removing hindrances, in habit and posture, as it is about putting in effort with the tongue.

Lying on your side is a good idea for those who are learning to keep their mouths shut and breathe through their nose through the night. However, the ultimate goal should be to sleep as you do. I am envious that you have managed this. I consider that my failure to has slowed my progress considerably. Did you just do it? Or did you need tactics to achieve it? If so please share them.

Many years ago I traveled across the country for a friend's party and ended up having to sleep on a hard wooden floor, no pillow or blankets. Just on my back. I woke up 8 hours later totally refreshed, having never woken up once, still on my back. It was one of the best night's sleep I have ever had. For some time afterward I used no pillow, and it was only through being in relationships and sleeping with someone else that I started using one again.  Now that I'm single again I'm in a position to maximize MY sleeping time and so am experimenting with the no pillow method. 

For a long time I slept on my right side. An accident had given me a troublesome SLAP tear in my left shoulder which was worse if I slept on it, so I stuck to my right. I don't think it did anything for my face as I started getting more wrinkled around the right eye, that was smooshed up against the pillow. So recently I took to sleeping on my back again and found that I stayed there all night. Losing the pillow is just the next step. You can "ease" yourself into it gently by folding up a towel into a thin strip and putting it under the curve of your neck. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/01/2019 1:10 pm
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As you undergo correction in the near future, please consider keeping records for your own sake and for others. Pictures of dental impressions, scans, medical reports reports can be very helpful even with all personally identifying information blocked out.

Your input could help many, many people

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