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Personal theory on how mewing effects the mandible  

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Yegor_L
Eminent Member

Here is a roughly-sketched image of what I believe might be happening during mewing which would effect the mandible as I will explain.

Whenever you see images of recessed skulls, you see an analogously high gonial angle. Now, when we talk about "moving the jaw forward, and making the base of the mandible appear more horizontal to the ground, there's an implication that the we want the gonial angle to decrease as well.

Most people simply describe mewing as a process by which the maxilla is pushed upwards, allowing the mandible to swing up, and this is very true, however, if I'm correct, incomplete. Seeing how the tongue is essentially connected to the rear of the mandible (at the gonial angle) it follows that when a force is exerted on the maxilla, an equal force is exerted in the opposite direction, on the gonial angle of the mandible.

Over time, as the maxilla is pushed upwards, the mandible at this bend would also experience the same force, over time causing the mandible to "buckle" at this point, leading to a decrease of the gonial angle, and a "squaring" of the jaw.

The top of the image is how mewing would happen without this mandible restructuring factored in, with the "recessed" mandible associated with the recessed maxilla, while the bottom shows the forces acting on the parts of the skull that lead to the effect I'm theorizing. 

It's important to note that this force downwards not only leads to the buckling at this angle, but since it's directed downward, it actively pushes the gonial away from the maxilla and downwards, increasing ramus length in the process.

Quote
Posted : 12/05/2018 8:36 pm
xDJ, Couda, Apollo and 2 people liked
EddieMoney
Reputable Member

I think I know where you are going with this , but what exactly do you mean by buckling?

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Posted : 12/05/2018 9:09 pm
Yegor_L
Eminent Member

I mean that since force is being applied directly at the gonial angle it will have nowhere else to move but to cave in on itself.

An analogy: While you are sitting down preferably, grab your relaxed leg with both hands at the bend in your knee, and pull it upwards, you leg will bend. This is essentially the same effect but on a much slower scale.

Or if you grab a downward-facing open book by the binding and lift it up, it will slowly close, because that is the only point of pressure being applied to it - at the bend.

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Posted : 12/05/2018 9:12 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member

Yeah this makes sense.

I also think that mewing activates the masseters by the teeth touching so the masseter hypertrophying causes the ramus to lengthen in response.

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Posted : 12/05/2018 9:20 pm
Keengo
Trusted Member

So the general idea is that mewing lifts and pushes the maxilla forwad, which then lets the mandible CCW rotate and down swing? I think this is the focus and goal, but how correlated are they?

Because I've mewed for getting to almost a year's time now and almost zero mandible change despite more prominent cheekbones; ogee curve; proper swallowing and less buccal muscle/hollower cheeks (just need to lower bodyfat more); and even a little maxilla rotation and better side-profile somewhat.

Is it just a slow process you think? I'm planning on using MK-677 to see if it helps, but the issue is that the government in the U.S. is going to make it a controlled substance/illegal soon I think.

Also these small changes are likely not noticeable in pictures, but I'm still not too confident that my mandible has changed much. Still have a so-so chin, but that's because of the high gonial angle/short ramus. If I achieved even 5-10 degree rotation from this my mandible will look perfect and I won't need any maxillary impaction/rotation surgically to solve this. My face is naturally angular anyways.

 

Also, ramus length? I didn't know that changed -- just that the mandible swung down and it remained same size.

** The face pulling "bag method" -- https://the-great-work.org/community/main-forum/face-pulling/#post-3902 **

** Keengo Chin Tuck method w/force (WIP)-- https://the-great-work.org/community/main-forum/chin-tuck-with-added-force-chin-tuck-2-0-new-theory-inside/ **

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/05/2018 9:20 pm
Yegor_L
Eminent Member

I'm sorry to hear about your results, but I can personally vouch for a pretty substantial lengthening of my ramus and gonial angle decrease.

I'm not comfortable posting pictures right now but perhaps in a year's or more time when I feel the results are truly undeniable. (I'm convinced my current results are on the same level as some of those in the success stories thread but I'm just waiting)

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/05/2018 9:25 pm
Rockyp33 liked
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: Keengo

So the general idea is that mewing lifts and pushes the maxilla forwad, which then lets the mandible CCW rotate and down swing? I think this is the focus and goal, but how correlated are they?

Because I've mewed for getting to almost a year's time now and almost zero mandible change despite more prominent cheekbones; ogee curve; proper swallowing and less buccal muscle/hollower cheeks (just need to lower bodyfat more); and even a little maxilla rotation and better side-profile somewhat.

Is it just a slow process you think? I'm planning on using MK-677 to see if it helps, but the issue is that the government in the U.S. is going to make it a controlled substance/illegal soon I think.

Also these small changes are likely not noticeable in pictures, but I'm still not too confident that my mandible has changed much. Still have a so-so chin, but that's because of the high gonial angle/short ramus. If I achieved even 5-10 degree rotation from this my mandible will look perfect and I won't need any maxillary impaction/rotation surgically to solve this. My face is naturally angular anyways.

You mentioned not practicing chin tucks (or as I call it neck lengthening). I notice that people with good maxilla rotation have good posture. I would say at this phase incorporate all body postural changes. It is entirely possible to have a wide mandible, wide palate, strong cheeks, but still a clockwise rotated maxilla is gravity is still acting to pull your maxilla down. Your idea of getting a dolichocephalic face is definitely posture related since it seems your face is still downward grown judging by your posts. 

You know how in Europe it seems narrow palates are common? Well it seems to me in the non Western world that long faces are common (even with better palate development). But one thing about the non Western world is nutrition is lacking so posture may suffer. Anyway, consider standing taller and I think you may see more changes. 

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Posted : 12/05/2018 9:28 pm
Greensmoothies
Estimable Member
Posted by: EddieMoney

Yeah this makes sense.

I also think that mewing activates the masseters by the teeth touching so the masseter hypertrophying causes the ramus to lengthen in response.

I have no idea how it works but I've Mewed 5 years, both with teeth touching and not, I believe teeth touching is vastly superior as my chin did become more developed, longer too, which could be a result of a longer ramus.

Just wanted to comment about teeth touching, have seen some posts where people don't touch teeth, IMO try to work up to having teeth touching when mewing and sleeping always, you lose growth potential otherwise from my experience.

Remember this pain... and let it activate you.

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Posted : 12/05/2018 9:48 pm
dapi and EddieMoney liked
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: Greensmoothies
Posted by: EddieMoney

Yeah this makes sense.

I also think that mewing activates the masseters by the teeth touching so the masseter hypertrophying causes the ramus to lengthen in response.

I have no idea how it works but I've Mewed 5 years, both with teeth touching and not, I believe teeth touching is vastly superior as my chin did become more developed, longer too, which could be a result of a longer ramus.

Just wanted to comment about teeth touching, have seen some posts where people don't touch teeth, IMO try to work up to having teeth touching when mewing and sleeping always, you lose growth potential otherwise from my experience.

Also I assume teeth touching allows the mandible width to also increase by force of the upper jaw pushing against the lower 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/05/2018 9:58 pm
Yegor_L
Eminent Member

Yeah I've always kept my teeth together when mewing. For the first few months I clenched relatively hard while mewing, but after a while I just kept my teeth firmly together, but not clenching as before.

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Posted : 12/05/2018 10:13 pm
Banknote
Eminent Member

then does the gonial angle also change position?

A lei do esforço nunca falha

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13/05/2018 9:58 am
Keengo
Trusted Member

Isn't it possible the maxilla can come forward but not rotate?

Based on the graph it seems the mandible is supposed to rotate down and forward only if the maxilla rotates as well.

** The face pulling "bag method" -- https://the-great-work.org/community/main-forum/face-pulling/#post-3902 **

** Keengo Chin Tuck method w/force (WIP)-- https://the-great-work.org/community/main-forum/chin-tuck-with-added-force-chin-tuck-2-0-new-theory-inside/ **

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13/05/2018 11:42 am
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: Keengo

Isn't it possible the maxilla can come forward but not rotate?

Based on the graph it seems the mandible is supposed to rotate down and forward only if the maxilla rotates as well.

Forward movement is mislabeled. Counterclockwise rotation is the true "forward" movement. Like I said, I believe firmly maxilla rotation is affected by how you stand. My maxilla has always been wide and I even will say my mandible development is decent (chin is a good size it just points down) but because I was raised by my grandparents and also spent a lot of time never being taught about standing properly, my maxilla is downward facing.

Contrast this with all the kids that grew up in higher income communities and were raised by young people (who stood properly) and you can see why my posture suffered .

Anyway the point is that cfd manifests itself differently based on how the individual lives. I may be wrong but you may have forward head posture if your gonial angle is still high and your maxilla is downward grown. These are classic forward head posture symptoms .

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13/05/2018 1:30 pm
Keengo
Trusted Member
Posted by: EddieMoney
Posted by: Keengo

Isn't it possible the maxilla can come forward but not rotate?

Based on the graph it seems the mandible is supposed to rotate down and forward only if the maxilla rotates as well.

Forward movement is mislabeled. Counterclockwise rotation is the true "forward" movement. Like I said, I believe firmly maxilla rotation is affected by how you stand. My maxilla has always been wide and I even will say my mandible development is decent (chin is a good size it just points down) but because I was raised by my grandparents and also spent a lot of time never being taught about standing properly, my maxilla is downward facing.

Contrast this with all the kids that grew up in higher income communities and were raised by young people (who stood properly) and you can see why my posture suffered .

Anyway the point is that cfd manifests itself differently based on how the individual lives. I may be wrong but you may have forward head posture if your gonial angle is still high and your maxilla is downward grown. These are classic forward head posture symptoms .

When I was a kid I became adjusted to sitting hunched over and playing video games a lot back then (the Nintendo/PlayStation-classic times). I would sit with little back support for sometimes 8+ hours a day doing this sometimes. I had a slouching posture which still isn't as ideal as I think it should be today, but I've improved a lot.

I don't have forward head posture though. I always lift my head up and look straight forward and keep it in line with my spine at least most of the time. I agree with the posture theory, but how much can posture really make a difference? I doubt most people have perfect posture 24/7 so it may be somewhat moot from the belief that suddenly sitting straighter 20 extra minutes a day can fix some bad examples of severe recession (not me -- just giving ideas here). Plus, with "text neck" (or forward head posture as you call it) you can see this with plenty of millennial-aged people (like most of us). I can't say about posture overall, but head posture being bad is probably the most common form of bad posture today, only with back being second probably. I don't see any relation between text neck and recession, but there's more to this than just posture obviously.

Reminding me of the other thread with Vin Diesel/The Rock, it was argued that Vin was really recessed, even though I didn't think so. This is odd since he looks pretty jacked and is definitely way more in shape than your average guy. He doesn't appear to have bad posture or any worse posture than most, but he's apparently recessed as hell. I think there's a small case of correlation/causation mixed in here with posture theory + CFD/recession, but I don't doubt there's an overlap somewhere will all these things. Or in other words, chicken or the egg. Were you recessed regardless of posture? Posture leading to recession/CFD issues? Being recessed even though you always had good posture? I find it hard to believe that anyone without recession always had perfect posture/fitness/diet/etc. -- and that anyone with it was guaranteed to have had bad posture/fitness/diet/etc. The truth is probably in the middle.

** The face pulling "bag method" -- https://the-great-work.org/community/main-forum/face-pulling/#post-3902 **

** Keengo Chin Tuck method w/force (WIP)-- https://the-great-work.org/community/main-forum/chin-tuck-with-added-force-chin-tuck-2-0-new-theory-inside/ **

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13/05/2018 2:17 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: Keengo
Posted by: EddieMoney
Posted by: Keengo

Isn't it possible the maxilla can come forward but not rotate?

Based on the graph it seems the mandible is supposed to rotate down and forward only if the maxilla rotates as well.

Forward movement is mislabeled. Counterclockwise rotation is the true "forward" movement. Like I said, I believe firmly maxilla rotation is affected by how you stand. My maxilla has always been wide and I even will say my mandible development is decent (chin is a good size it just points down) but because I was raised by my grandparents and also spent a lot of time never being taught about standing properly, my maxilla is downward facing.

Contrast this with all the kids that grew up in higher income communities and were raised by young people (who stood properly) and you can see why my posture suffered .

Anyway the point is that cfd manifests itself differently based on how the individual lives. I may be wrong but you may have forward head posture if your gonial angle is still high and your maxilla is downward grown. These are classic forward head posture symptoms .

When I was a kid I became adjusted to sitting hunched over and playing video games a lot back then (the Nintendo/PlayStation-classic times). I would sit with little back support for sometimes 8+ hours a day doing this sometimes. I had a slouching posture which still isn't as ideal as I think it should be today, but I've improved a lot.

I don't have forward head posture though. I always lift my head up and look straight forward and keep it in line with my spine at least most of the time. I agree with the posture theory, but how much can posture really make a difference? I doubt most people have perfect posture 24/7 so it may be somewhat moot from the belief that suddenly sitting straighter 20 extra minutes a day can fix some bad examples of severe recession (not me -- just giving ideas here). Plus, with "text neck" (or forward head posture as you call it) you can see this with plenty of millennial-aged people (like most of us). I can't say about posture overall, but head posture being bad is probably the most common form of bad posture today, only with back being second probably. I don't see any relation between text neck and recession, but there's more to this than just posture obviously.

Reminding me of the other thread with Vin Diesel/The Rock, it was argued that Vin was really recessed, even though I didn't think so. This is odd since he looks pretty jacked and is definitely way more in shape than your average guy. He doesn't appear to have bad posture or any worse posture than most, but he's apparently recessed as hell. I think there's a small case of correlation/causation mixed in here with posture theory + CFD/recession, but I don't doubt there's an overlap somewhere will all these things. Or in other words, chicken or the egg. Were you recessed regardless of posture? Posture leading to recession/CFD issues? Being recessed even though you always had good posture? I find it hard to believe that anyone without recession always had perfect posture/fitness/diet/etc. -- and that anyone with it was guaranteed to have had bad posture/fitness/diet/etc. The truth is probably in the middle.

You said you don't tuck your chin which is why I said you have forward head posture 

Also, lots of "jacked" guys have bad posture. Lifting doesn't guarantee straight posture. It can make it worse oftentimes.  

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Posted : 13/05/2018 2:43 pm
Keengo
Trusted Member

People who lift should have more powerful muscles, which should support bones. Stronger bones and muscles should work in tandem to correct things like back pain, stiffness and tightness and even encourage better posture by having to improve it through various functional static+dynamic muscle force exertions. Not saying that every serious lifter has good posture, but I think there's a tendency for people committed to lifting and exercising somewhat regularly to have at least decent posture and mobility.

I'm not talking about "gymbros" or the meathead stereotypes that just use tons of steroids and [Rude Language or Insults are not tolerated] to lift big weights and ignore posture, form, etc. I mean your common lifter who makes time for doing cardio, weights, maybe plyometrics+HIIT, bodyweight/running, etc. There's a connection between exercise and posture in general. Maybe Vin just has bad posture, sure, but I wouldn't bet on it. My posture improved almost automatically when I did deadlifts and shoulder presses more.

** The face pulling "bag method" -- https://the-great-work.org/community/main-forum/face-pulling/#post-3902 **

** Keengo Chin Tuck method w/force (WIP)-- https://the-great-work.org/community/main-forum/chin-tuck-with-added-force-chin-tuck-2-0-new-theory-inside/ **

ReplyQuote
Posted : 15/05/2018 1:46 am
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: Keengo

People who lift should have more powerful muscles, which should support bones. Stronger bones and muscles should work in tandem to correct things like back pain, stiffness and tightness and even encourage better posture by having to improve it through various functional static+dynamic muscle force exertions. Not saying that every serious lifter has good posture, but I think there's a tendency for people committed to lifting and exercising somewhat regularly to have at least decent posture and mobility.

I'm not talking about "gymbros" or the meathead stereotypes that just use tons of steroids and [Rude Language or Insults are not tolerated] to lift big weights and ignore posture, form, etc. I mean your common lifter who makes time for doing cardio, weights, maybe plyometrics+HIIT, bodyweight/running, etc. There's a connection between exercise and posture in general. Maybe Vin just has bad posture, sure, but I wouldn't bet on it. My posture improved almost automatically when I did deadlifts and shoulder presses more.

You're not wrong. However posture is more than just working out. For example many lifters have bad posture due to the fact pushing exercises like bench press and barbell squats are so popular. Sure these may make you jacked but if your posture is bad they will only exacerbate the situation due to being unnatural movements. 

I have to mention I work in a health club (and have done so for the past 10 years). And to be honest about myself even though I have been lifting for 16 years, I just recently this year fixed my forward head posture thanks to this forum. And I am an experienced lifter at that who knows a bit about exercise programming. 

From what I observe, most lifters don't care about posture or health. The majority of people who lift do so because they want to look good better naked. As a result, many important aspects of fitness like posture are neglected entirely. Few people do unilateral motions for example. There are great emphases on benching but how many people give rowing that much of a priority? Jacked guys come to me all the time with "my shoulders/back hurt" despite the fact their musculature is well developed. Well it is in the muscles they SEE. Not so much the muscles that prop them upright.

I rarely see people doing exercises like high (face) pulls, reverse flyes , glute kickbacks, hip bridges, or plank variations (all exercises that focus on spinal positioning) with the same candor that I see them give pressing or curls or squats. Postural work doesn't make girls check Instagram after all. 

Truth us your average gym goer is not that well versed on this stuff. Even many popular routines like 5x5, 5/3/1, Starting strength, HST, DC method etc don't really make much room for many postural exercises at all. This means even the gurus leave stuff out. 

And no hate to him, as I genuinely like the guy but Vin definitely comes off as a gym bro. If you also google many pics of his side profile he does seem to have head forward posture many times. I am not surprised by that since he also seems to have his mouth open oftentimes which to me indicates he is a mouth breather.

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Posted : 15/05/2018 4:00 pm
Adam
 Adam
Eminent Member
Posted by: EddieMoney

I rarely see people doing exercises like high (face) pulls, reverse flyes , glute kickbacks, hip bridges, or plank variations (all exercises that focus on spinal positioning) with the same candor that I see them give pressing or curls or squats. Postural work doesn't make girls check Instagram after all. 

Truth us your average gym goer is not that well versed on this stuff. Even many popular routines like 5x5, 5/3/1, Starting strength, HST, DC method etc don't really make much room for many postural exercises at all. This means even the gurus leave stuff out. 

What are the exercises you would recommend the most for posture? What about deadlift variations and traps exercises?

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Posted : 15/05/2018 6:39 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: Adam
Posted by: EddieMoney

I rarely see people doing exercises like high (face) pulls, reverse flyes , glute kickbacks, hip bridges, or plank variations (all exercises that focus on spinal positioning) with the same candor that I see them give pressing or curls or squats. Postural work doesn't make girls check Instagram after all. 

Truth us your average gym goer is not that well versed on this stuff. Even many popular routines like 5x5, 5/3/1, Starting strength, HST, DC method etc don't really make much room for many postural exercises at all. This means even the gurus leave stuff out. 

What are the exercises you would recommend the most for posture? What about deadlift variations and traps exercises?

Trap exercises are great. Exercises that retract and protract the shoulder blades like face pulls (not the maxilla kind), rear delt flyes, overhead barbell elevation (inverted shrugs), just shrugging on dip bars, etc.

Now for legs I like 1 leg deadlifts (it isn't just legs obviously). Some people call them suitcase deadlifts . If you can do 135 with good spine posture you are doing great. I like hip bridges, hip extensions off the roman chair, 1 leg stiff leg deadlifts too 

Conventional barbell deads are cool but you need impeccable form. To be quite honest they are not necessary though especially trained in powerlifting style (where the goal is upping 1rm). No need to max out if posture is your goal. I have gotten to 455 and that is enough for me. Nowadays I just train in hopes of getting taller. Not saying they are bad though, just do Em like a baller and don't try and impress anyone. 

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Posted : 15/05/2018 10:45 pm
Adam liked
Skull
Trusted Member
Posted by: Keengo

So the general idea is that mewing lifts and pushes the maxilla forwad, which then lets the mandible CCW rotate and down swing? I think this is the focus and goal, but how correlated are they?

Because I've mewed for getting to almost a year's time now and almost zero mandible change despite more prominent cheekbones; ogee curve; proper swallowing and less buccal muscle/hollower cheeks (just need to lower bodyfat more); and even a little maxilla rotation and better side-profile somewhat.

Is it just a slow process you think? I'm planning on using MK-677 to see if it helps, but the issue is that the government in the U.S. is going to make it a controlled substance/illegal soon I think.

Also these small changes are likely not noticeable in pictures, but I'm still not too confident that my mandible has changed much. Still have a so-so chin, but that's because of the high gonial angle/short ramus. If I achieved even 5-10 degree rotation from this my mandible will look perfect and I won't need any maxillary impaction/rotation surgically to solve this. My face is naturally angular anyways.

 

Also, ramus length? I didn't know that changed -- just that the mandible swung down and it remained same size.

Have you tried chewing gum? I've been chewing gum for a month or less and I've seen results on my jaw, even more results than I've seen on my maxilla and cheek bones in 4 months with mewing. You should try it. I chew every day around 2 hours, sometimes less sometimes more. One "trick" I found to harden the gum is sipping cold water while you're chewing. Good luck.. ah and by the way when did you start seeing big results on your cheekbones?

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Posted : 16/05/2018 3:01 am
Skull
Trusted Member
Posted by: Keengo

So the general idea is that mewing lifts and pushes the maxilla forwad, which then lets the mandible CCW rotate and down swing? I think this is the focus and goal, but how correlated are they?

Because I've mewed for getting to almost a year's time now and almost zero mandible change despite more prominent cheekbones; ogee curve; proper swallowing and less buccal muscle/hollower cheeks (just need to lower bodyfat more); and even a little maxilla rotation and better side-profile somewhat.

Is it just a slow process you think? I'm planning on using MK-677 to see if it helps, but the issue is that the government in the U.S. is going to make it a controlled substance/illegal soon I think.

Also these small changes are likely not noticeable in pictures, but I'm still not too confident that my mandible has changed much. Still have a so-so chin, but that's because of the high gonial angle/short ramus. If I achieved even 5-10 degree rotation from this my mandible will look perfect and I won't need any maxillary impaction/rotation surgically to solve this. My face is naturally angular anyways.

 

Also, ramus length? I didn't know that changed -- just that the mandible swung down and it remained same size.

Have you tried chewing gum? I've been chewing gum for a month or less and I've seen results on my jaw, even more results than I've seen on my maxilla and cheek bones in 4 months with mewing. You should try it. I chew every day around 2 hours, sometimes less sometimes more. One "trick" I found to harden the gum is sipping cold water while you're chewing. Good luck.. ah and by the way when did you start seeing big results on your cheekbones?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 16/05/2018 3:01 am
Skull
Trusted Member
Posted by: Keengo

So the general idea is that mewing lifts and pushes the maxilla forwad, which then lets the mandible CCW rotate and down swing? I think this is the focus and goal, but how correlated are they?

Because I've mewed for getting to almost a year's time now and almost zero mandible change despite more prominent cheekbones; ogee curve; proper swallowing and less buccal muscle/hollower cheeks (just need to lower bodyfat more); and even a little maxilla rotation and better side-profile somewhat.

Is it just a slow process you think? I'm planning on using MK-677 to see if it helps, but the issue is that the government in the U.S. is going to make it a controlled substance/illegal soon I think.

Also these small changes are likely not noticeable in pictures, but I'm still not too confident that my mandible has changed much. Still have a so-so chin, but that's because of the high gonial angle/short ramus. If I achieved even 5-10 degree rotation from this my mandible will look perfect and I won't need any maxillary impaction/rotation surgically to solve this. My face is naturally angular anyways.

 

Also, ramus length? I didn't know that changed -- just that the mandible swung down and it remained same size.

Have you tried chewing gum? I've been chewing gum for a month or less and I've seen results on my jaw, even more results than I've seen on my maxilla and cheek bones in 4 months with mewing. You should try it. I chew every day around 2 hours, sometimes less sometimes more. One "trick" I found to harden the gum is sipping cold water while you're chewing. Good luck.. ah and by the way when did you start seeing big results on your cheekbones?

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Posted : 16/05/2018 3:01 am
Rockyp33
Reputable Member

Can’t wait till you post results!

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Posted : 18/05/2018 3:34 pm
xDJ
 xDJ
Active Member

It could be the pressure from the sternocleidomastoid. In proper head posture, the ramus rests against this neck muscle on each side. Could that be a force driving the mandible forwards?

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Posted : 02/06/2019 6:17 am
Facetimeskink
Active Member

I’ve noticed this exact kind of movement too! The tongue is creating opposing forces, so whichever way things can move to create space in either direction, they will. I’ve gotten a decreased gonial angle but little forward growth in my maxilla, and actually, for me that’s a decent improvement in my profile.

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Posted : 07/09/2019 9:21 am
auff
 auff
New Member

So, when hard mewing do i need to apply force on the soft palate?
Or shouldn't be i applying more force at the middle and front of the hard palate not at the back. Will this help in rotation?

Thanks

 

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Posted : 07/09/2019 2:47 pm