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Nutrition  

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Apollo
(@apollo)
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I believe my diet is pretty healthy. Besides the occasional indulgence, I approximate a paleo philosophy with a lot of vegetables, meats, fruits, healthy fats, prebiotics, and fermented foods, while minimizing grains, added sugars, artificial sweeteners, and processed foods. I am beginning to wonder if there are any specific foods or supplements that I should take to enhance bone repositioning and remodeling. For example, as the midpalatal suture separates, I assume we want the bones to grow and fill in the gap? If so, what nutrients does the body need to promote such growth? Vitamin D3, K2, calcium, magnesium? Should I be drinking bone broth or eating organ meats? I haven't found much about this topic in the breakthematrix forum or the claimingpower site. CP discusses a specific diet in this article ( http://claimingpower.com/comfrety-root-accelerated-bone-repair/ ), but I'm not sure what to make of it. I'd really appreciate if anyone could give me ideas of what they take and why, or point me to relevant resources. Thanks!

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Posted : 11/01/2018 10:35 pm
Apollo
(@apollo)
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I noticed @test151515 recommends intermittent fasting. I already eat only two meals per day between the hours of 1pm and 8pm. That leaves about 17 hours of fasting per day. I know this isn't as intense a fasting schedule as some adhere to, but I think anything more rigorous might undermine my compliance. @test151515 suggests that the intermittent fasting increases HGH levels and he believes this has improved his results.

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Posted : 11/01/2018 10:56 pm
Apollo
(@apollo)
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Both Claimingpower (  http://claimingpower.com/comfrety-root-accelerated-bone-repair/  ) and Plato (  http://jawpain-tmjtreatment.com/ ) mention the Weston A. Price Foundation Diet ( http://www.westonaprice.org/ ). This seems to be largely consistent with my interpretation of a "paleo" approach from Mark Sisson ( https://www.marksdailyapple.com/ ) and others. Both advocate intake of saturated animal fats, coconut oil, olive oil and other healthy fats along with pasture-raised meats and dairy, vegetables, and fruits, facilitating the absorption of fat-soluble nutrients. The Price diet seems to emphasize the utility of supplementing fish liver oils while minimizing the utility of fish oil.

Edited: 5 months  ago
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Posted : 12/01/2018 5:35 pm TGW liked
Allixa
(@allixa)
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Nutrition is something that I have been looking into for a while. At this point I am confident that I have it figured out.

To keep things short and simple the main goal is to eat as much healthy food as possible while following your instincts in order to boost your metabolism and gut biome health to their limits. Once your metabolism is very high and your gut biome is top notch, your body will be able to make changes like putting on muscle or changing your facial bones with ease. It needs fuel, energy, and health to do these things; all of which can you can provide through a diet that is abundant with good foods.

The paleo movement gets a lot right but also a lot wrong. They are correct to cut out PUFAs (vegetable oils), refined sugar (like table sugar), and to make people look at wheat more closely, but they focus too much on meats and vegetables, and not enough on dairy, starches, and fruits/honey.

Fasting can be dangerous as well. Most of the benefits that people get from fasting actually come from the fact that they are no longer eating bad foods during their fasting window. This is particularly true for studies done on animals which is where most of the fasting benefits get sourced from. If your diet is full of only good foods you should be able to eat whenever you want with no issue, and this will actually help you get results more quickly.

I would recommend to start reading at perfecthealthdiet.com. Here's a summary of the diet. They have a book you can read as well. It's a much better place to start than paleo or WAPF and I'd consider it to be probably the best dietary advice that currently exists even if I think they could make a few small improvements. Fair warning: they say to avoid wheat, but if that sounds too extreme for you just ignore that part and focus on everything else they say. The issues that most have with wheat might be due to farming/agribusiness practices. The book 'Wheat Belly' talks about this. But if you are interested in experimenting you can give the true version of the diet a try and see how you feel, I definitely recommend it.

But like I said I could go on for a long time on this topic. If you have any specific questions just let me know, otherwise I am going to stop now so that I don't overload you with information.

Edited: 3 days  ago
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Posted : 22/01/2018 5:33 pm Apollo liked
Apollo
(@apollo)
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Posted by: Allixa

To keep things short and simple the main goal is to eat as much healthy food as possible while following your instincts in order to boost your metabolism to its limit. Once your metabolism is very high, your body will be able to make changes like putting on muscle or changing your facial bones with ease. It needs fuel and energy to do these things; you have to provide this through a diet of abundance.

I definitely agree with the concept of supplying the body with an abundance of healthy, nutrient-dense food! Can you explain more of what you mean by "following your instincts in order to boost your metabolism to its limit?" Thanks for introducing me to the Perfect Health Diet. I'll read more, but it looks interesting! I already eat a lot of dairy and fruits, but I tend to avoid honey and other added sweeteners, and starches other than resistant prebiotics.

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Posted : 22/01/2018 10:02 pm
Allixa
(@allixa)
Reputable Member

What I mean by following your instincts when it comes to food is learning how to get in tune with your body and knowing what your body needs and what it is craving. I guess you could call it intuitive eating. The idea is to know what fuel your body needs at any particular meal in order to give you the biggest boost possible. Over time with good eating you should be able to access new planes of health that you haven't been at before. A lot of the time I see people who have taken in too much misinformation actively fighting their body's instincts and cravings because they are scared of food or are scared to eat too much for fear of calories or fats or whatever.

The real key is to have full belief in the foods you have decided to make part of your diet and then to eat them in the amounts that your body tells you that it needs them. Only your body can truly know what it needs and when it needs it.

Starches are interesting .. most of them are bad but a few are great. When you do more reading on the website I linked maybe you'll come around to them. Honey can be good for you as well if you can find local raw honey. But my advice would be for any changes you want to make to your diet to go very slowly and make up your own mind by seeing the effects first hand.

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Posted : 23/01/2018 1:14 am Apollo liked
Progress
(@progress)
Member Moderator

Interesting, intuitive eating is what I've been graviting towards for a while now. I have spent whole 2010s experimenting with various dietary perspectives such as low carb, low fat, eating a certain amount of calories etc, and I think it has only had negative effect on my wellbeing. Stressing over food intake is possibly more harmful to health in the long term than most harmful foods, because in the end stress is very anti-metabolic and anything that weakens metabolism fastens aging, leads to diseasess and decreases wellbeing. So I agree with the importance of keeping metabolism running as efficiently as possible.

However, there's still one aspect of intuitive eating for maximized metabolism that I am unsure about. Allixa, what would you do if you had no hunger, or vague hunger with no specific craving? If I go by hunger alone, I often end up undereating and activating stress hormones. Intuitively, it would make some sense to eat less until you crave more. I would LIKE to think that my body knows what it wants. But, us being so detached from the nature and surrounded by modern foreign stressors, how reasonable is it to go purely by what the body tells you? Should I force-eat against the will of my body in an attempt to increase metabolism, or focus on living more closely to how I have evolved to live, and let the normal functioning of the hunger system take over?

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Posted : 23/01/2018 12:07 pm
Allixa
(@allixa)
Reputable Member

You are right on the money with your first paragraph. Then with the second paragraph you manage to point out one of the biggest flaws with intuitive eating and that is that sometimes your body and your cravings do not cooperate and are not helpful.

The two most common reasons that a person might have a low appetite with only vague hunger are anemia and having a non optimal gut biome. The two usually go hand in hand as well, almost like a domino effect. There could be other reasons for a low appetite as well like poor tooth occlusion, stress, and improper circadian rhythm too, but that's up to you to figure out for yourself.

Anyways, if it is anemia which you can kind of tell by how much color your face has without a tan, the best way to solve that is to eat a lot of lightly cooked red meats and organs. I'm talking about medium rare steaks, rare livers, etc. The meat should still be bloody and red, this is very important. If your digestion is very weak there is a chance you can't digest red meats and at that point you should focus more on organs like liver. Someone actually won the nobel prize in medicine for discovering that some patients could only be cured of anemia by eating liver (in this link the doctor describes actually curing patients who had the exact same symptoms that you described earlier just through feeding liver). Liver is also very important for the skeletal changes we are trying to make here as it contains the activator X that W. Price referred to, which is actually vitamin A (animal form only). I try to eat liver at least once a week, usually from chickens as it is easier to eat those more often than cow liver for various reasons.

On the other hand, if it is bad flora holding you back, then you can solve that by eating more prebiotic foods, avoiding foods that feed the bad bacteria like sugars and refined foods, and by taking some probiotics if you think they might help you.

Those are just my guesses at what might help you. They might not apply to your situation so experiment and see what kind of changes you can make.

Edited: 5 months  ago
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Posted : 23/01/2018 2:23 pm
Gregory
(@gjenopp)
Trusted Member

I was just reflecting now that getting complete amino acid profile would be important for masseter muscle development, and that same muscle development would reinforce/affect the balance between masticatory muscles and the palate. 
You wear your muscles down during the day with hard chewing, and by incorporating a complete amino acid profile it should add to the protein synthesis of musculature in the face. 
So... in that sense, might as well include consideration for optimal macros, yes.

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Posted : 15/02/2018 11:40 am
Yay
 Yay
(@Yay)
Guest

I’m curious what supplements I might need to take as a vegan (I know but please work with me here) who gets calcium kidney stones? I think some of my facial changes are due to a loss of bone density 

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Posted : 01/03/2018 9:18 pm
Allixa
(@allixa)
Reputable Member
Posted by: Yay

I’m curious what supplements I might need to take as a vegan (I know but please work with me here) who gets calcium kidney stones? I think some of my facial changes are due to a loss of bone density 

@Yay, Being vegan might explain why your results are so slow.

If a person goes vegan then they are making a choice to put the health of animals over their own health.

Kidney stones can come from having too little calcium in your diet.

As far as supplements go, I can't recommend any. The best supplements are good food. I think that you should look towards moving away from veganism if you truly want results.

Edited: 1 month  ago
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Posted : 09/03/2018 7:43 pm
Apollo
(@apollo)
Reputable Member
Posted by: Apollo
Posted by: Gregory
Also have read something about vitamin balances/imbalances causing the bones to become weaker which....i suppose creates an environment in which deossification is possible????

 

This is what I was trying to get at in my "Nutrition" thread. I was hoping someone more knowledgeable than me would break it down. I must be oversimplifying this, but to achieve bone remodeling, it seems to me that we want an abundance (but not excess) of vitamins which encourage both osteoclasts (cells which break down bone) and osteoblasts (cells which build up bone). So vitamin A stimulates parathyroid hormone's osteoclastic activity, liberating calcium from bones into the blood, and vitamin D stimulates osteoblastic activity, depositing calcium from the blood in the bone. Vitamin K2 and magnesium seem to be important modulators of this mineralization balance. While I'm trying to improve my diet, I am also debating supplementing a multivitamin, D3, K2, and magnesium. Vitamin A excess has some bad side effects so for that I will stick with only the multivitamin and food sources. I also think that my dietary calcium intake is adequate. Do you think taking these supplements would be worthwhile? Do you have suggestions for any specific foods or other vitamins, minerals, or trace elements that you think are important for bone remodeling?

As I understand it, Vitamin A is important for bone remodeling because it stimulates parathyroid hormones' osteoclast activation. This breaks down bone, which liberates calcium into the blood stream. Vitamin D is important for the opposite function, stimulating osteoblasts to take up calcium from the blood to build bone. The Weston A. Price Foundation diet emphasizes fermented cod liver oil because it is naturally high in both vitamin A and D in a good ratio. Most processed cod liver oils are stripped of their vitamins and then synthetic vitamins are added back in. Vitamin A excess is not something to be trifled with, but supposedly the synthetic form of this fat-soluble vitamin is far more prone to accumulate in adipose tissue and other lipophilic environments (like the brain) than the natural form. Our bodies are not efficient at converting plant-based sources of vitamin A like beta carotene into its bioavailable form. So Weston A. Price and other sources recommend natural animal-based sources for vitamin A. The fermented cod liver oil is so expensive that I haven't ordered it. I've been debating adding grass-fed beef liver to my diet as an inexpensive natural source for vitamin A, B vitamins, other minerals, etc. It isn't a great source for vitamin D, so I would continue to take a vitamin D supplement. I've already stopped taking my multivitamin so I'm looking for something to take its place. I read this article about liver on the Weston A. Price Foundation website (  https://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/food-features/the-liver-files/ ). One method they recommend is swallowing small bits of frozen, raw grass-fed beef liver. They claim that freezing for two weeks will kill any potential pathogens, but other online sources give conflicting reports on its safety (  http://www.theherbalspoon.com/2016/06/raw-liver-safe.html ). One blogger claims she was infected by an "intestinal parasite" by eating raw beef liver, which had been frozen following the 2 week protocol, but she doesn't specify which parasite (  https://freethoughtfarm.wordpress.com/tag/frozen-raw-liver/ ).

I've done some additional research, and I think I am convinced that I can satisfy the conditions that will make it safe. I know a local farm with pasture raised cuts of beef. I trust that they take good care of their animals. I'm not concerned about ingesting bacteria, but I think the potentially scary pathogen is the helminth liver fluke Fasciola hepatica which spends part of its life cycle in the liver of ruminant livestock like cattle and sheep. Humans can also act as hosts with complications including chronic inflammation of the bile ducts, jaundice, cholangitis, even cancer. Not something I want. Human cases are typically contracted through consumption of aquatic vegetation infected by a different stage of the fluke life cycle which encyst in wetlands, but consumption of raw liver has also been documented as a cause. A 1986 source shows the distribution of liver fluke in the USA limited to wet regions in the south and west.

I don't live in these states, but other reports suggest the range of cases is increasing. The other factor seems to be the efficacy of freezing to kill the parasite. FDA food industry guidelines  ( https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/GuidanceRegulation/UCM252393.pdf ) specific to fish parasites require freezing and storing fish at a surrounding temperature of -4 degrees Fahrenheit or colder for seven days, or freezing at a surrounding temperature of -31 degrees or colder until the fish is solid and storing at the same temperature for 15 hours, or freezing at a surrounding temperature of -31 degrees until the fish is solid and storing at -4 degrees or below for 24 hours. Some species of liver fluke use fish as an intermediate host. I believe these requirements should be the same for beef liver as it is for fish. The FDA warns that these techniques may not be suitable for particularly large fish, like those thicker than six inches. The liver I would be purchasing would already be frozen and should be in sufficiently small portions. Not all home refrigerator freezers get cold enough. I would monitor the temperature of my freezer using a thermometer, and wait at least the 14 days recommended by the Weston A. Price Foundation, which is twice the time required by the FDA (on top of the time it was frozen at the farm). 

So, what do you think? Am I crazy, or might this be a good way to naturally supplement some of the vitamins important for bone remodeling?

Edited: 2 weeks  ago
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Posted : 04/06/2018 8:26 pm
Allixa
(@allixa)
Reputable Member

Vitamin A is definitely important. Adding liver to your diet is a great choice that I highly recommend. Overdose isn't an issue if you just follow your intuition - it will start to taste bad and you will stop craving it once your body has what it needs. Most recommend eating liver once a week, but you might enjoy doing it more often at first.

There's no need to go crazy eating raw livers. Sounds like a fad created by bloggers who don't know what they are doing. Most internet health bloggers are out of their minds. Do you have a whole foods near you? Pick this up in the meat section:

Chicken livers are better than cow/calf livers for many reasons. Both are good but chicken livers have less vitamin A (but still a huge amount) so that you can eat them more often, and they have a better zinc/copper ratio.

All you have to do with these is fry them in a pan for a about a minute per side. When they are properly done the inside should be rare (not medium rare) and they should taste sweet and not bitter at all. Overcooking liver is what makes it bitter.

If that sounds like too much work for you another route is just to pick up some liverwurst or liver pate from whole foods as well. They sell chicken and pork versions of those.

Edited: 2 weeks  ago
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Posted : 04/06/2018 10:31 pm Apollo liked
Apollo
(@apollo)
Reputable Member

Thanks for the input @allixa! I've eaten cooked chicken livers a few times, and I think I had a bite of cooked beef liver once, but that's about the extent of my experience with it. I guess the rational for consuming liver raw or lightly-cooked is that the anti-fatigue effect is supposed to be stronger. My understanding is that some of the B-vitamins are heat-sensitive. The flavor is also supposed to be more bitter when over-cooked. The Weston A. Price Foundation article I linked to included some cooked recipe options including pate. Anyway, I think I'll experiment with different options and see how they make me feel.

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Posted : 05/06/2018 3:04 pm
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As you undergo correction in the near future, please consider keeping records for your own sake and for others. Pictures of dental impressions, scans, medical reports reports can be very helpful even with all personally identifying information blocked out.

Your input could help many, many people

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