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Newb Tongue/Teeth Positioning: Mew vs. Hornsby  

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ShaktiOm
(@shakti_om)
Active Member

I just started mewing a couple days ago and I'm looking for some guidance to clear up some confusion I'm having about proper tongue and teeth positioning. 

1. Dr. Mew says that at rest the teeth should be lightly touching, but I saw Sarah Hornsby say in a YouTube comment that the teeth should be 1 to 2 mm apart. My personal experience so far is that I am more comfortable when I keep the teeth slightly apart but I find that my tongue sometimes slips through my teeth and I can end up biting my tongue. When I try keeping them lightly touching, I end up clinching. Experience/advice?

2. I have heard Dr. Mew talk about the tongue being like a balloon, and when the tongue inflates, it keeps the front teeth pushed forward, and the lips keep the teeth back. That would mean the tongue is touching the front teeth. But again I saw Sarah Hornsby say that the tongue should not touch the front teeth. I would like to not where my retainer anymore at night, but I do not want my bottom front teeth getting crooked like I have seen in some other people. 

It has been a very short period of time of course, but the first morning I woke up after the previous day of mewing felt amazing. All the muscles in my face felt taught, I was breathing more deeply, and my speaking voice felt more relaxed and powerful. I fully understand that it can be a long journey, especially since I am in my 30's, but I'm looking forward to the health benefits, and would love to see my impacted wisdom teeth come in that I never got removed.

Thanks in advance for any sharing or advice the community has to offer.

This topic was modified 3 months ago by ShaktiOm
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Posted : 23/09/2018 5:01 pm
Rockyp33
(@rockyp33)
Estimable Member

I experimented on this for about 2 months. i noticed when mewing wiht a slightly open bite it seemed to workout my tongue a bit more but it was harder to keep the lower third up. When i went back to mewing with my bite closed i realized i lost a good bit of posture i once had and im still trying to get it back. with a closed bite i believe its much easier to achiever proper tongue posture and maintain it and too apply more force against the maxilla.

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Posted : 23/09/2018 10:22 pm
ShaktiOm
(@shakti_om)
Active Member

I also have found lately that I get better tongue posture with a closed bite, and do much stronger tongue push-ups when my bite is closed and clenched. However, I'm still working on not clenching when in a resting, closed bite position. 

 

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Posted : 24/09/2018 7:08 pm
ShaktiOm
(@shakti_om)
Active Member

Following up to part two of my question, it is likely that both Dr. Mew and Sarah Hornsby agree for the most part on tongue positioning. Based on this article ( https://tinyurl.com/yd85wyhv ) Dr. Mew instructs that the tip of the tongue should be right above the top two front teeth. Sarah also instructs the same.

In this video ( https://tinyurl.com/ybpz5lsv ) Dr. Mew discusses that inflating the tongue like a balloon keeps the teeth straight. I insinuated above that this means the tongue will push against the front teeth, but this is not necessarily true. Sarah discusses in this video... https://tinyurl.com/yby9e5v4   how the tongue should fill up the entire space of your mouth, very similar to Dr. Mew's balloon metaphor.

When positioning the tongue properly to the roof of the mouth and filling the space like a balloon, if the tip of the tongue is positioned correctly, I find that the tongue cannot press against the top front teeth, but I do feel a part of my tongue touching the bottom front teeth. At this point I'm still not sure if that means I am doing it incorrectly or not.

More questions...

Is it the force of the tongue against the bottom front teeth that keep them straight? Also, is it the force of the sides of the tongue pushing against the inside of the molars that creates more inter-molar width? Or is inter-molar width created by the upward pressure of the tongue alone? I'm not sure if I should be trying to push against the inside of my molars with the sides of my tongue or not.

 

This post was modified 3 months ago 6 times by ShaktiOm
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Posted : 24/09/2018 7:37 pm
ShaktiOm
(@shakti_om)
Active Member

Darkindigo,

I agree that we should not stress too much about mewing and tongue position, but I would much rather do it correctly in order to increase the chances of positive results. Here is a video from Dr. Mew on the importance of the back part of the tongue pressing up against the soft palate....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2vqxBkRoXI

This post was modified 2 months ago by ShaktiOm
ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/09/2018 8:31 am
Abdulrahman
(@abdulrahman)
Estimable Member

1. You are probably clinching while trying to keep your teeth lightly together because your mastication muscles are weak and lower jaw is not lined up correctly with the upper

2. The front of the tongue should not touch the front teeth, ideally it just sit behind them.

name changed from abdul to Abdulrahman

ReplyQuote
Posted : 28/09/2018 9:34 am
ShaktiOm
(@shakti_om)
Active Member
Posted by: Abdulrahman

1. You are probably clinching while trying to keep your teeth lightly together because your mastication muscles are weak and lower jaw is not lined up correctly with the upper

2. The front of the tongue should not touch the front teeth, ideally it just sit behind them.

Abdulrahman,

1. You may be right about my weak mastication muscles. I received some Falim gum in the mail yesterday, and will start chewing 30 minutes to an hour a day. Not sure about my lower jaw being lined up with the upper jaw, but I'm assuming as my upper palate expands, and I keep up with the chewing, the lower jaw and teeth will change accordingly. I am getting much better at not clenching, but I still have to be conscious of not doing it especially while doing tongue push-ups.

2. When you say the tongue should not touch the front teeth, I assume you're talking about lower and upper? I have only been mewing for a week, but I find my tongue is already sitting up higher and further back in the roof of my mouth. This is probably from both a slight expansion in my palate and increased upper inter-molar width, along with a stronger tongue that I'm able to position better between the upper molars. Because of this, for the most part, I no longer feel my tongue touching my bottom front teeth.

What confuses me though, is how do the bottom front teeth stay straight or straighten if they are crooked? Is it simply through mastication and palate expansion?

This post was modified 2 months ago by ShaktiOm
ReplyQuote
Posted : 29/09/2018 9:18 am
Abdulrahman
(@abdulrahman)
Estimable Member
Posted by: ShaktiOm

Abdulrahman,

1. You may be right about my weak mastication muscles. I received some Falim gum in the mail yesterday, and will start chewing 30 minutes to an hour a day. Not sure about my lower jaw being lined up with the upper jaw, but I'm assuming as my upper palate expands, and I keep up with the chewing, the lower jaw and teeth will change accordingly. I am getting much better at not clenching, but I still have to be conscious of not doing it especially while doing tongue push-ups.

2. When you say the tongue should not touch the front teeth, I assume you're talking about lower and upper? I have only been mewing for a week, but I find my tongue is already sitting up higher and further back in the roof of my mouth. This is probably from both a slight expansion in my palate and increased upper inter-molar width, along with a stronger tongue that I'm able to position better between the upper molars. Because of this, for the most part, I no longer feel my tongue touching my bottom front teeth.

What confuses me though, is how do the bottom front teeth stay straight or straighten if they are crooked? Is it simply through mastication and palate expansion?

The upper teeth, normally the lower teeth are too far to be a concern.

Yes the tongue needs to posture higher and deeper into the hard and soft palates. Its called a suction hold and supposed to happen automatically once you place your tongue in the correct spot.

Since the upper teeth are supported by the tongue and the lowers are not, they just follow the lead of the upper teeth.

 

name changed from abdul to Abdulrahman

ReplyQuote
Posted : 29/09/2018 11:01 am
ShaktiOm
(@shakti_om)
Active Member
Posted by: Abdulrahman
 
The upper teeth, normally the lower teeth are too far to be a concern.
 
Yes the tongue needs to posture higher and deeper into the hard and soft palates. Its called a suction hold and supposed to happen automatically once you place your tongue in the correct spot.
 
Since the upper teeth are supported by the tongue and the lowers are not, they just follow the lead of the upper teeth.

I experienced the suction hold you described today! It feels amazing! Within the first few days of mewing I felt forms of suction, mostly to the roof of my mouth and partially on the soft palate, but today my tongue feels like it's in the back of my throat with no effort at all.

When it first happened I felt a rush of energy flow through my entire body and all the muscles in my face and jaw became extremely sore. A couple hours later the jaw soreness turned into pain, so I spent about an hour chewing some gum, to get my tongue out of that position for a little while, and it really helped. Tongue promptly went to the back of the throat again after the chew session. Good stuff!

Edit: Noticing a lot of the suction is missing now but tongue is still locked back. Two steps forward one step back has been common in my process thus far.

This post was modified 2 months ago by ShaktiOm
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Posted : 29/09/2018 4:36 pm
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As you undergo correction in the near future, please consider keeping records for your own sake and for others. Pictures of dental impressions, scans, medical reports reports can be very helpful even with all personally identifying information blocked out.

Your input could help many, many people

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