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mewing is messing up how i breathe  

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Rockyp33
(@rockyp33)
Estimable Member

Since i started mewing ive definitely been able to breath easier but when i focus on tongue posture particularly getting the back 3rd up a lot of the time i notice my breathing gets shallow and its hard to breathe well and i think it adds a lot of stress to my body. any body experience this?

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Posted : 17/07/2018 2:57 am
Rockyp33
(@rockyp33)
Estimable Member

I just feel like i stop breathing corrrectly

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Posted : 17/07/2018 2:58 am
Apollo
(@apollo)
Honorable Member
Posted by: Apollo
Posted by: Jeffrey
@apollo you said that the soft palate presses into the airway, and the video you linked of Mr Mew said that it was normal to have some discomfort and that people with horizontal growth only have a small amount of the palate pressing against the airway. Does this mean that with constant practise of correct oral posture, you will train your palate to only have a small amount of it pressing against the airway? Or will the constant practise of correct oral posture push the maxilla up and forward, and thus allow you to breathe easier?
I'm so confused about how correct oral posture! When you have correct oral posture, can you not breathe through your nose because 1. tongue tie? 2. you need to push your maxilla up? 3. it's normal?
so many contradicting statements!

 Hi Jeffery, here's my post you mentioned from another thread:

Posted by: Apollo
Yes, the very reason people don't tend to practice proper oral posture is because it impinges their airway, and this perpetuates the downward spiral of the maxilla dropping further down and back, further restricting the airway. Anyone without adequate tongue space will find that the posterior third, when correctly seated on the roof of the mouth, will press the soft palate into the pharynx, restricting breathing through the nose. This can even be a sign that you have achieved correct oral posture. Then you have to practice the control to back off just enough to breath, while still keeping the posterior tongue engaged.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2vqxBkRoXI

It sounds like you understood what I was trying to explain. I suspect what you describe as difficulty breathing when practicing correct oral posture is what all of us experience with any level of craniofacial dystrophy. With a recessed maxialla and/or narrow palate restricting tongue space, lifting the posterior tongue against the soft palate completely or partially obstructs the pharynx. If you really had a tongue tie, surgically removing part of the lingual frenulum would make it easier for you to lift your tongue to the roof of your mouth, but it wouldn't prevent the posterior tongue from blocking your airway. The only way to fix this, as you suggest, is to create more tongue space, but unfortunately, this requires keeping your posterior tongue in the position that is blocking your airway. We can't stop breathing, so what to do? I find that lifting my tongue up to the point that it closes off my pharynx is a good indicator helping me to know that I am correctly engaging the posterior part of my tongue which seems to be crucial to achieving change. Then, I can practice reducing the pressure of my tongue just enough to inhale and exhale while hearing and feeling the resistance of the air passing through the narrowed space. Finally I try to back off the tongue enough to breathe relatively freely, while still trying to feel that posterior tongue contacting the soft palate. It's a delicate balance, that I probably am not maintaining correctly most of the time, but the idea is that it gets easier as you become more accustomed to the posture and hopefully as your maxilla slowly moves up and forward, creating more tongue space in the processes, and in a virtuous cycle making it easier to be more consistent with correct oral posture. If you have a narrow maxillary arch, palate expanders can create lateral space to fit your tongue on your palate with less restriction on your airway. Does that all make sense?

 

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Posted : 17/07/2018 2:50 pm
Dominik
(@dominik)
Trusted Member

@Apollo what does it mean if I do have the back of the tongue up there, can push even a good bit of the soft palate up and go into a chin-tuck, but I can breathe easy even then.

I wouldn't say my face is long, more like broad and short, compared to my forehead by a lot, but in the front the maxilla is still down making my upper teeth slope from back to front down which shoves the mandible back and creates a longer space between my nose and chin than I have observed on most ppl.  I still lack eye support tho and have a flat-ish face. I don't get why I can breathe easy while most other ppl say they suffocate in proper tongue and spine posture. Is my maxilla not down in the back?

Back molar distance is 40 mm tho and I can clearly feel the tongue pushing them sideways now towards my cheeks, especially the right side.

This post was modified 1 month  ago by Dominik
This post was modified 1 month  ago by Dominik
This post was modified 1 month  ago by Dominik
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Posted : 18/07/2018 12:30 am
Apollo
(@apollo)
Honorable Member
Posted by: Dominik

@Apollo what does it mean if I do have the back of the tongue up there, can push even a good bit of the soft palate up and go into a chin-tuck, but I can breathe easy even then.

I wouldn't say my face is long, more like broad and short, but in the front the maxilla is still down making my upper teeth slope from back to front down which shoves the mandible back and creates a longer space between my nose and chin than I have observed on most ppl.  I still lack eye support tho and have a flat-ish face. I don't get why I can breathe easy while most other ppl say they suffocate in proper tongue and spine posture. Is my maxilla not down in the back?

Back molar distance is 40 mm tho and I can clearly feel the tongue pushing them sideways now towards my cheeks, especially the right side.

Sounds like you have enough tongue space so that lifting the posterior 1/3 of your tongue against the soft palate doesn't push it against the back of your pharynx and obstruct airflow. This is a good sign that you will be able to adopt correct tongue posture without the inhibition of breathing problems. It's hard to say without seeing your anatomy what dimension of your maxilla is allowing enough space for your tongue to stay out of the airway while still engaging the soft palate, but your intermolar width is pretty good. Since I have expanded my intermolar width from 34mm to a little narrower than yours I find it much easier to correctly posture my tongue and breathe freely.

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Posted : 18/07/2018 1:04 am
Dominik
(@dominik)
Trusted Member
Posted by: Apollo
Posted by: Dominik

@Apollo what does it mean if I do have the back of the tongue up there, can push even a good bit of the soft palate up and go into a chin-tuck, but I can breathe easy even then.

I wouldn't say my face is long, more like broad and short, but in the front the maxilla is still down making my upper teeth slope from back to front down which shoves the mandible back and creates a longer space between my nose and chin than I have observed on most ppl.  I still lack eye support tho and have a flat-ish face. I don't get why I can breathe easy while most other ppl say they suffocate in proper tongue and spine posture. Is my maxilla not down in the back?

Back molar distance is 40 mm tho and I can clearly feel the tongue pushing them sideways now towards my cheeks, especially the right side.

Sounds like you have enough tongue space so that lifting the posterior 1/3 of your tongue against the soft palate doesn't push it against the back of your pharynx and obstruct airflow. This is a good sign that you will be able to adopt correct tongue posture without the inhibition of breathing problems. It's hard to say without seeing your anatomy what dimension of your maxilla is allowing enough space for your tongue to stay out of the airway while still engaging the soft palate, but your intermolar width is pretty good. Since I have expanded my intermolar width from 34mm to a little narrower than yours I find it much easier to correctly posture my tongue and breathe freely.

I'll post a before and after thread with pictures 5 months from now and then every 6 months. Front & side view as well as jaws. Good thing I#m a hobby photographer, will try to make it from same position, same lighting.

@Rockyp33 in time with mewing you should be able to breathe. Btw I tape my mouth shut at night, with tape that leaves no adhesive marks. Its probably a good idea for you if you mouth-breathe at night and don't yet have sleep apnea. Mouth breathing at night causes inflammation of the soft tissue in the mouth & throat. If it subsides, it might make it easier to breathe.

 

This post was modified 1 month  ago by Dominik
This post was modified 1 month  ago by Dominik
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Posted : 18/07/2018 2:16 am
Rockyp33
(@rockyp33)
Estimable Member

Its just really tough to breathe with it up there but i guess that means your doing the right things its strange. i think the main reason why it makes it hard to breathe is because of lack of back tongue strength so all the muscles around it tightnen up and makes breathing harder i noticed that after holdign it up theres i relax a bit and it makes it much easier to breathe.its crazy ive been mewing for ayear but i havent been getting the 3rd up like i need to still.

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Posted : 18/07/2018 2:49 am
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As you undergo correction in the near future, please consider keeping records for your own sake and for others. Pictures of dental impressions, scans, medical reports reports can be very helpful even with all personally identifying information blocked out.

Your input could help many, many people

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