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Male-pattern baldness and CFD  

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noises
Eminent Member

I know this topic has been discussed on the forum before but I don't recall there being a topic devoted to the theory implicating CFD as an underlying cause of MPB.

For starters, here's a scientific paper linking mechanical tension of the scalp to androgenetic alopecia: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4639964/

I'll be honest, I don't have the patience to study all the material written about this in depth. I'd mostly like to share this crude observation I've made:

This theory has been "debunked" by pointing to examples of men with relatively good craniofacial development who in some cases have suffered from aggressive MPB at a young age and conversely, examples of men with seemingly more severe CFD with full heads of hair. Besides an obvious genetic component I think it could also be a matter of early vs. late-onset CFD.

The CFD sufferers with good heads of hair seem to have underdeveloped bones. Here's Zlatan Ibrahimovic

?imwidth=450

His maxilla is growth-deficient in the sagittal dimension because he probably never had any form of proper tongue posture. Due to the bones not projecting, his scalp isn't subject to mechanical tension

Here's Freddie Ljungberg

He has a forward-grown maxilla but also some symptoms of CFD; short ramus, antegonial notch, obtuse gonial angle, acute nasolabial angle, recessed undereye area. Perhaps he had proper tongue posture as a child that became weaker with age, or it was always deficient. The downswinging, well-projecting maxilla is stretching the occipitofrontalis muscle out more than an underdeveloped one and affecting circulation in the galea aponeurotica according to the Norwood pattern, which is actually a stress pattern created by mechanical tension.

Of course there's the ultimate dilemma: how come Mike Mew himself is balding? Well, I suppose he does have mild CFD after all, and maybe that combined with well-projecting bones and a strong genetic predisposition is all it takes.

Personally, I've noticed that my hairline has become less diffuse after mewing and I'm almost completely positive about this. I think my eyebrows might be very slightly thicker too. I'm curious about the possibility that the circulation has improved in the follicles of my scalp and face but even though they haven't grown much thicker hairs on their own, they could respond well to external help. Probably going to do some experiments with minoxidil at some point.

Just some thoughts.

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Posted : 28/04/2020 2:24 pm
PolHolmes
Eminent Member

I don't think there's a correlation whatsoever, you see plenty of people, balding and non-balding with good and poor facial form. Androgenic alopecia is simply down to the fact that your hair follicles are too sensitive to dihydrotestosterone, which causes the hair follicle to atrophy over time. The calcification and circulation theory have been pretty much debunked, if you weren't getting sufficient circulation to the head, I think balding would be the least of your problems. Also, by taking a DHT blocker, most people are able to offset balding or slow it down substantially.

PS. Was balding myself and have CFD, but taking finasteride has pretty much fixed that. Thankfully.

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Posted : 28/04/2020 3:34 pm
Progress
Member Moderator
Posted by: @noises

 

Thank you, I've been looking for this graph forever! What I find intriguing about bald men is that often there is a visible protrusion on the top of their head,  Ljungberg has it too. Their domes are almost cone-shaped. I'll show a few examples to illustrate this phenomenon:

From what I understand, this bump is some sort of thick and immobile fibrotic tissue. Healthy scalps tend to be thin and mobile. Though also, I can't help but think back on the study I posted on the masseter vs temporalis thread which showed how a similar looking skeletal bump was associated with low temporalis proportion:

 

Posted by: @polholmes

I don't think there's a correlation whatsoever, you see plenty of people, balding and non-balding with good and poor facial form. Androgenic alopecia is simply down to the fact that your hair follicles are too sensitive to dihydrotestosterone, which causes the hair follicle to atrophy over time. The calcification and circulation theory have been pretty much debunked, if you weren't getting sufficient circulation to the head, I think balding would be the least of your problems. Also, by taking a DHT blocker, most people are able to offset balding or slow it down substantially.

PS. Was balding myself and have CFD, but taking finasteride has pretty much fixed that. Thankfully.

Elevation of DHT in the hair follicle seems to be a defense response against some kind of stress. Rather than suffering from over-sensitivity to DHT, the follicle is simply being flooded with supranormal amounts of the hormone. Evidently the same phenomenon that floods the follicle with DHT is also causing the scalp to turn into thick and immobile fibrotic tissue as I highlighted above. Attributing balding to over-sensitivity to one hormone and calling it a day does inconveniently little to illuminate the big picture. The reason Finasteride works is that it simply interrupts the chain of events that ends at balding. It does not address the underlying cause. To me, viewing mechanical tension as a potential underlying cause for such stress response does not seem unreasonable at all.

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Posted : 28/04/2020 4:21 pm
PolHolmes
Eminent Member

@progress

'The number of DHT receptors on the hair follicles increases in the balding scalp', that is what I'm referring to when I say sensitivity. I'm simply stating that once you eliminate DHT through the use of medication, it halts the hair loss for a majority of people.

 

Even still, I'm not really sure what it has to do with CFD. If balding were to be the 'cause', then surely a large majority of women wouldn't suffer from it, due to not balding at all.

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Posted : 28/04/2020 7:46 pm
Progress
Member Moderator
Posted by: @polholmes

@progress

'The number of DHT receptors on the hair follicles increases in the balding scalp', that is what I'm referring to when I say sensitivity. I'm simply stating that once you eliminate DHT through the use of medication, it halts the hair loss for a majority of people.

 

Even still, I'm not really sure what it has to do with CFD. If balding were to be the 'cause', then surely a large majority of women wouldn't suffer from it, due to not balding at all.

The intensity of the response that causes DHT to increase in the scalp would evidently vary from individual to individual, and of course between men and women too. This would conveniently explain why there is only loose correlation between the extent of balding and severity of CFD. The correlation may then appear even looser if we assume that several types of craniofacial dystrophy exist, all of which would affect the shape of the skull in different ways. Hence not all kinds of dystrophy would lead to baldness.

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Posted : 28/04/2020 8:34 pm
Elwynn liked
noises
Eminent Member

@PolHolmes

Did you even look at the article? They did a stress simulation on a galea model that accurately mimics the kind of tension CFD would induce and the result strongly parallels the progression of MPB. It says this right there in the article:

All these data suggest that mechanical stress determines AGA patterning and a stretch-induced and androgen-mediated mechanotransduction in dermal papilla cells could be the primary mechanism in AGA pathogenesis.

Also another factor I didn’t articulate that could explain early-onset CFD being less susceptible to this is that much like individual teeth for example, the skin could fulfill its genetic potential and essentially grow to facilitate greater projection of the bones. This is why it could hold up better to this tension.

Here’s a diagram to help visualize the forces on the scalp that tongue posture should sufficiently temper in structural harmony

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Posted : 29/04/2020 5:32 am
Silver
Trusted Member

You're actually exactly right. Rob over at PerfectHairHealth.com (no affiliation, but I am a customer) has fairly conclusively documented the etiology of MPB, and it is very multi-factorial, but ultimately what happens is enough calcification and fibrosis forms a kind of keloid scar tissue, not unlike scleroderma, that chokes the circulation to the hair follicles and they slowly can no longer create hair. That's why bald scalp skin looks a little different: it looks shiny and is tight against the scalp. You can loosen the scalp and bring back the circulation over a period of about six to twelve months with a protocol of vigorous scalp massage for fifteen minutes twice a day. Most men, however, also have diffuse balding, which is a completely different issue caused by systemic unhealthiness. His program has fairly thorough information for both and they've worked well for me, and the progress pictures and follow-up data he has gathered are unmatched by literally anything else. Funnily enough, I actually found out about PHH from this forum! I had to find out much later that my diffuse balding was chiefly caused by low-level mercury poisoning, which I am very successfully treating with Andrew Cutler's chelation protocol.

I suspect that CFD may contribute to MPB scalp tension by forcing you to recruit a lot of forehead and brow muscles just to see.

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Posted : 01/05/2020 10:10 pm
Progress
Member Moderator
Posted by: @silver

You're actually exactly right. Rob over at PerfectHairHealth.com (no affiliation, but I am a customer) has fairly conclusively documented the etiology of MPB, and it is very multi-factorial, but ultimately what happens is enough calcification and fibrosis forms a kind of keloid scar tissue, not unlike scleroderma, that chokes the circulation to the hair follicles and they slowly can no longer create hair. That's why bald scalp skin looks a little different: it looks shiny and is tight against the scalp. You can loosen the scalp and bring back the circulation over a period of about six to twelve months with a protocol of vigorous scalp massage for fifteen minutes twice a day. Most men, however, also have diffuse balding, which is a completely different issue caused by systemic unhealthiness. His program has fairly thorough information for both and they've worked well for me, and the progress pictures and follow-up data he has gathered are unmatched by literally anything else. Funnily enough, I actually found out about PHH from this forum! I had to find out much later that my diffuse balding was chiefly caused by low-level mercury poisoning, which I am very successfully treating with Andrew Cutler's chelation protocol.

I suspect that CFD may contribute to MPB scalp tension by forcing you to recruit a lot of forehead and brow muscles just to see.

Is the aim to massage the whole scalp, or the bald areas only?

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Posted : 02/05/2020 5:22 am
Silver
Trusted Member
Posted by: @progress
Posted by: @silver

snip

Is the aim to massage the whole scalp, or the bald areas only?

The whole scalp! There are two different massages you do for the hairline or vertex area, where you might be balding, and for the perimeter, where a lot of the muscular tension for the whole scalp is generated. You alternate between the three sections per every time you massage. It's pretty cool. I recommend checking out his website. He has recently launched a whole forum (with a lot of activity) and a number of research guides. He responds to emails, too.

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Posted : 02/05/2020 1:49 pm
moemoe
Active Member

Thanks Silver for pointing out the website. I had a look and I have decided to give scalp massages a go.

You mention the routine alternates the 3 sections per massage session. Is this from information only accessible to members? Are you a paying member of his community?

Thanks

M.

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Posted : 02/05/2020 6:40 pm
Camus
New Member

@silver Hey man, thanks for this! I checked out his website and am pretty excited to start these massages. Been on fin for 4 months without any regrowth, so hopefully these techniques will help me fight back against my forehead colonizing the rest of my scalp.

I also want to say that according to the research done by ppl like Rob, CFD would only affect your hair insomuch as it affects your scalp tension. If you have CFD that increases your tension, it’s possible it’s contributing to your hair loss. However, baldness is a multifaceted problem, and you can’t start looking at bald people and guessing how well their face is formed in order to determine whether your theory is right. There are so many variables that go into a problem like this. Maybe Zlatan doesn’t have the genetics to be affected by increased DHT, maybe The Rock has scalp tension despite his obviously well formed face.

Personally, I’m actually pretty sure mewing has contributed to my hairline beginning to recede; mewing/chewing has given me a lot of jaw and scalp tension that I am only now starting to address.

A lot of people on this forum are ideologues, suggesting tongue posture can fix pretty much anything. Please be realistic.

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Posted : 05/05/2020 1:42 am
noises
Eminent Member
Posted by: @camus

maybe The Rock has scalp tension despite his obviously well formed face.

The Rock is pretty far from pitch-perfect craniofacial development. Compare his skull to that of his father who was less affected by hair loss, it's much slimmer and longer. Looks like The Rock has the small temporalis proportion and a recessed midface. CFD is a multifaceted problem and I think it'll explain the origins of scalp tension in all these cases once you figure out its full pathology with all the variables and their interrelationships

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Posted : 05/05/2020 9:05 am
Silver
Trusted Member
Posted by: @moemoe

Thanks Silver for pointing out the website. I had a look and I have decided to give scalp massages a go.

 

You mention the routine alternates the 3 sections per massage session. Is this from information only accessible to members? Are you a paying member of his community?

 

Thanks

 

M.

 

You are correct, I am. He charges for six-month increments at a time, which is supposed to be the minimum length of time it takes to see results. I think it's worth it to do it at least once, download the ebook and watch the scalp massage video, and then you're basically set unless you want to have access to the forums and as of yet–unreleased content.

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Posted : 05/05/2020 6:47 pm
moemoe liked
Silver
Trusted Member
Posted by: @camus

@silver Hey man, thanks for this! I checked out his website and am pretty excited to start these massages. Been on fin for 4 months without any regrowth, so hopefully these techniques will help me fight back against my forehead colonizing the rest of my scalp.

I also want to say that according to the research done by ppl like Rob, CFD would only affect your hair insomuch as it affects your scalp tension. If you have CFD that increases your tension, it’s possible it’s contributing to your hair loss. However, baldness is a multifaceted problem, and you can’t start looking at bald people and guessing how well their face is formed in order to determine whether your theory is right. There are so many variables that go into a problem like this. Maybe Zlatan doesn’t have the genetics to be affected by increased DHT, maybe The Rock has scalp tension despite his obviously well formed face.

Personally, I’m actually pretty sure mewing has contributed to my hairline beginning to recede; mewing/chewing has given me a lot of jaw and scalp tension that I am only now starting to address.

A lot of people on this forum are ideologues, suggesting tongue posture can fix pretty much anything. Please be realistic.

Agreed—except for that last paragraph. No one really knows, yet. Mewing just has not been around that long! I think if you rectify your CFD you will definitely have much less scalp tension, but I could be wrong—and maybe the process of doing so temporarily increases tension.

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Posted : 05/05/2020 6:49 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member

@Progress

I have noticed over time my top skeletal protrusion has actually reduced, making my head look less cone shaped. I don't know if my postural changes have had anything to do with this, or my temporalis chewing. But nonetheless the bump isn't as prominent as it used to be. 

 

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Posted : 17/05/2020 3:49 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member

@noises I don't think Dwayne is even balding. His hairline has been that high since he was a toddler. He actually said the reason he shaves his head is because his hair is a combo "between an afro and hair from a Lama's ball sack"

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Posted : 17/05/2020 3:53 pm
auxiliary
Estimable Member
Posted by: @eddiemoney

@noises I don't think Dwayne is even balding. His hairline has been that high since he was a toddler. He actually said the reason he shaves his head is because his hair is a combo "between an afro and hair from a Lama's ball sack"

Can we even use Dwayne Jonhson as an example? He's on growth hormone and steroids, so him balding isn't surprising and his face looking different is also not surprising. Growth Hormone makes mandible very prominent.

 

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Posted : 17/05/2020 3:56 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: @auxiliarus
Posted by: @eddiemoney

@noises I don't think Dwayne is even balding. His hairline has been that high since he was a toddler. He actually said the reason he shaves his head is because his hair is a combo "between an afro and hair from a Lama's ball sack"

Can we even use Dwayne Jonhson as an example? He's on growth hormone and steroids, so him balding isn't surprising and his face looking different is also not surprising. Growth Hormone makes mandible very prominent.

 

His mandible has always looked that way even as a kid. Plus he is Polynesian and they have prominent mandibles

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Posted : 17/05/2020 4:09 pm
auxiliary
Estimable Member
Posted by: @eddiemoney
Posted by: @auxiliarus
Posted by: @eddiemoney

@noises I don't think Dwayne is even balding. His hairline has been that high since he was a toddler. He actually said the reason he shaves his head is because his hair is a combo "between an afro and hair from a Lama's ball sack"

Can we even use Dwayne Jonhson as an example? He's on growth hormone and steroids, so him balding isn't surprising and his face looking different is also not surprising. Growth Hormone makes mandible very prominent.

 

His mandible has always looked that way even as a kid. Plus he is Polynesian and they have prominent mandibles

Yep, he's also a genetic freak, way taller than average Polynesian and definitely bigger, I mean look at him when he was 15. He was already a monster, then he hopped on insane gear and now at 28,95 FFMI if I put him at 15% body-fat. That's why he's not an average subject to study, even if he did have CFD, it could be masked just by the pure size of his facial bones.

 

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Posted : 17/05/2020 4:44 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: @auxiliarus
Posted by: @eddiemoney
Posted by: @auxiliarus
Posted by: @eddiemoney

@noises I don't think Dwayne is even balding. His hairline has been that high since he was a toddler. He actually said the reason he shaves his head is because his hair is a combo "between an afro and hair from a Lama's ball sack"

Can we even use Dwayne Jonhson as an example? He's on growth hormone and steroids, so him balding isn't surprising and his face looking different is also not surprising. Growth Hormone makes mandible very prominent.

 

His mandible has always looked that way even as a kid. Plus he is Polynesian and they have prominent mandibles

Yep, he's also a genetic freak, way taller than average Polynesian and definitely bigger, I mean look at him when he was 15. He was already a monster, then he hopped on insane gear and now at 28,95 FFMI if I put him at 15% body-fat. That's why he's not an average subject to study, even if he did have CFD, it could be masked just by the pure size of his facial bones.

 

The any CFD he may have is not very visible to me. Even looking at the OP I couldn't really see CFD in that bald Scandinavian guy

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Posted : 17/05/2020 5:22 pm
wtccominatya
New Member

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/339407683_Malocclusion_and_Hair_Loss_An_Intimate_Relationship check this new study out. I personally am losing my hair and and an othro i visited noted jaw retrusion. i can feel my jaw bone in my ears too. i wonder if foward expansion can help the occlysion of the temporal artery and give me my hair back. After expansion id micro needle in order to revive the hair cells. It seems possible. Intresting enough balding is prevalent in the males of my dads side but telling from pictures their face do look recessed as well

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Posted : 18/05/2020 6:38 pm
Progress
Member Moderator
Posted by: @eddiemoney

@Progress

I have noticed over time my top skeletal protrusion has actually reduced, making my head look less cone shaped. I don't know if my postural changes have had anything to do with this, or my temporalis chewing. But nonetheless the bump isn't as prominent as it used to be. 

 

That's nice to hear. So it really is a skeletal protrusion, rather than thick soft tissue.

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Posted : 19/05/2020 10:29 am
EddieMoney
Reputable Member

@progress I am not sure tbh. Where did you find it's soft tissue? 

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Posted : 19/05/2020 2:57 pm
Progress
Member Moderator
Posted by: @eddiemoney

@progress I am not sure tbh. Where did you find it's soft tissue? 

It was just a blind assumption, due to bald people usually having a thick and fibrotic scalp.

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Posted : 19/05/2020 4:11 pm
Greensmoothies
Estimable Member
Posted by: @progress
Posted by: @eddiemoney

@progress I am not sure tbh. Where did you find it's soft tissue? 

It was just a blind assumption, due to bald people usually having a thick and fibrotic scalp.

I think that is part of the complex of issues that contribute toward male-pattern baldness. Use of my PEMF device has resulted in growing in a bunch of tiny hairs at the hairline (bringing me closer to NW0) which is said to be because it promotes lymph and blood flow. Liquids in the body become thinned (so its flow is easier) and calcified/fibrotic areas are eventually brought back to their healthy state. The other place I saw this occur was my chin, which had been a problem acne area for me. I have PCOS which results in elevated DHT levels, so you can get MPB-type hair loss, hirsutism and acne (especially on the chin). But the use of the PEMF showed me it's not the DHT that needs to be attacked directly per se, but the calcification that results or just so happens to occur side-by-side with the DHT elevation (which I suspect has some sort of protective effect to deal with the non-ideal circumstances).

There was a study, by the Japanese I think, about how to position your baby to prevent their skull shape from taking on the shape believed to eventually lead to balding, but for the life of me I can't find it. As per the medical establishment, you can only significantly shape the skull of an infant under 1 years old, and they will usually not do the flat-head helmets after that (which produces a weird, perfectly-rounded skull type result IMO, but probably better than untreated severe plagiocephaly).

Remember this pain... and let it activate you.

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Posted : 19/05/2020 5:26 pm
Basim
Eminent Member

I'm 16 years old(almost 17) and my hairline is a mature hairline somewhat I see my temples as well even though my hairline is really full and not thining. I do wonder that my facial development and posture is a factor of me having this hairline quite early since I had when I was 14 and already growing a beard that point. I understand hormones and DHT definitely play a role of hair loss but it's quite multi factorial and other things play a role such as diet, blood flow, etc.

However IMO I believe that hair loss is mostly from DHT and other factors and only secondarily to hormones since my grandfather and great grandfather have similar facial development to my dad and didn't bald as much until a later age even though they have pretty recessed faces

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Posted : 24/05/2020 12:27 pm
James
Eminent Member
Basim
Eminent Member

I have actually found an article where hair loss primarily comes from your skull shape that Progress says that an oval or round face shape causes  hair loss than an square face shape and also says that skull expansion is the real reason that causes hairloss and uptake in DHT levels. This article combined with posture, in theory proves that with proper diet and Mewing to your near genetic potential of getting a balanced square skull can reverse hair loss or at the very least prevents more hair loss to occur. I have found this article intriguing and actually provides a free Ebook in his page. Plus he does talk about other factors about hairloss like diet, hormones, and genetics. I suggest everyone on this forum to read his story. It's truly inspiring like perfect hair health.

Article Link: https://www.hairgrowthsos.com/skull-expansion.html

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Posted : 31/05/2020 11:51 am
Basim
Eminent Member

What's it's even more crazy that I noticed from this article. Is that most celebrities with a square faces have essentially no hairloss or have a mature hairline( a hairline with slight rescission of the temples). Guys like Tom cruise, David Beckham, Brad Pitt, Zac Efron, have no or very little hair loss despite being in their 30s and above. While guys like the rock, DiCaprio, Vin diesel, Elon Musk( who had a hair transplant), and Joe Rogan and failed miserably; these guys are in the same age group as I presented above yet with a rounder skull shape had suffered significant hairloss and earlier and faster rate than the celebs with the square faces.

DISCLAIMER: This is only taken as generally who you see. Other guys who don't have a square face and still have hair. Maybe blessed good genetics, lifestyle, or other factors(drugs). Prevented their hairloss or suffer less damage to their hair.

This theory does provide IMO the best explanation why DHT when uptaked to an extreme level does damage to your hair that it should. It wouldn't make sense DHT causes body hair growth and hair loss on the scalp when it's job to give growth to the body as bones, the nervous system, and other processes in the body. I believe this debunks the idea that hair follicles are genetically programmed entirely. Where as Skull expansion is the real cause of hair follicles death.

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Posted : 31/05/2020 12:25 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: @basim

What's it's even more crazy that I noticed from this article. Is that most celebrities with a square faces have essentially no hairloss or have a mature hairline( a hairline with slight rescission of the temples). Guys like Tom cruise, David Beckham, Brad Pitt, Zac Efron, have no or very little hair loss despite being in their 30s and above. While guys like the rock, DiCaprio, Vin diesel, Elon Musk( who had a hair transplant), and Joe Rogan and failed miserably; these guys are in the same age group as I presented above yet with a rounder skull shape had suffered significant hairloss and earlier and faster rate than the celebs with the square faces.

DISCLAIMER: This is only taken as generally who you see. Other guys who don't have a square face and still have hair. Maybe blessed good genetics, lifestyle, or other factors(drugs). Prevented their hairloss or suffer less damage to their hair.

This theory does provide IMO the best explanation why DHT when uptaked to an extreme level does damage to your hair that it should. It wouldn't make sense DHT causes body hair growth and hair loss on the scalp when it's job to give growth to the body as bones, the nervous system, and other processes in the body. I believe this debunks the idea that hair follicles are genetically programmed entirely. Where as Skull expansion is the real cause of hair follicles death.

David Beckham has lost a lot of hair

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Posted : 31/05/2020 6:27 pm
Adam
 Adam
Eminent Member

There is a norwegian guy on YT claiming that IF regrown his hair, but he was hardcore mewer also.

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Posted : 31/05/2020 6:46 pm
Basim
Eminent Member

I still firmly stand on the fact that genetics still have a massive role on why men have hairloss or not. But Genetics are probably at best maybe 20-30 percent of the cause of  hairloss. Since we don't know how many genes regulate hair growth and that each individual hair follicle on different spots of the skull are more prone to hairloss than others. If DHT was the main cause of hairloss and since DHT is a hormone that can be controlled. People taking DHT blockers such as finasteride amd other drugs have a good track record of stopping or even reversing hairloss. Then secondary factors like diet, excerise, hormones, skull shape, and other factors probably contribute more than genetics does of why you have hairloss. Then again everyone has predisposition, so your base has a ceiling as well. But remember genetics is the not the only cause that causes hairloss.

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Posted : 31/05/2020 8:03 pm
Adam liked
moemoe
Active Member
Posted by: @eddiemoney

David Beckham has lost a lot of hair

Yup, and he's had hair transplant in the past

 

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Posted : 01/06/2020 2:30 am
moemoe
Active Member
Posted by: @adam

There is a norwegian guy on YT claiming that IF regrown his hair, but he was hardcore mewer also.

Do you happen to have the link at hand?

thanks

 

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Posted : 01/06/2020 2:30 am
EddieMoney
Reputable Member

I feel like my skull is an elongated version of Beckham's rounder skull. But our overall shape is similar. 

Anyway I have theories on how CFD can affect facial hair growth.

 

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Posted : 01/06/2020 3:14 am
Adam
 Adam
Eminent Member

I found it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XYWCigq9iY hair part starts from 8. Whole channel is a good content.

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Posted : 01/06/2020 7:54 am
moemoe liked
mr.mewing
Estimable Member

One thing i notice with people that go bald at a young age in my town is that they all have a sloped forehead

 

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Posted : 04/06/2020 3:21 pm
Progress
Member Moderator
Posted by: @mr-mewing

One thing i notice with people that go bald at a young age in my town is that they all have a sloped forehead

 

Yeah that's true. Superimposing your examples, it's intriguing how all other features line up except the eyes & the forehead:

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Posted : 04/06/2020 5:25 pm
harrykanemaxilla
Estimable Member

@eddiemoney

how does CFD affect facial hair growth?

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Posted : 04/06/2020 6:45 pm
Captain Horatio Hornblower
Eminent Member
Posted by: @mr-mewing

One thing i notice with people that go bald at a young age in my town is that they all have a sloped forehead

 

Funny, I noticed the same with me. I have an overly sloped forehead and unfortunately I suffer from premature hair loss.

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Posted : 04/06/2020 8:22 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: @harrykanemaxilla

@eddiemoney

how does CFD affect facial hair growth?

Specifically in my case I feel like forward growth has stretched my face forward and this has contributed to previous "bald" spots filling out. I wonder if the skin being pulled or allowed to stretch makes follicles healthier. It's not like these "bald" spots were hairless. The hair just wasn't as dense. 

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Posted : 04/06/2020 8:28 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: @mr-mewing

One thing i notice with people that go bald at a young age in my town is that they all have a sloped forehead

 

Possibly but I have noticed baldness doesn't discriminate. I know tons of bald guys with flat foreheads just the same

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Posted : 04/06/2020 8:35 pm
chiefkeefsosa
Active Member

@eddiemoney From you're experienced how much forward growth of the maxilla do you think realistically is possible in people over 18(from mewing)? Do you think we can only get a few mm's or is 1cm of forward growth possible(and realistic)?

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Posted : 04/06/2020 9:11 pm
Basim
Eminent Member

Mewing is still effective even after 25.  However you can get about 1 mn per year like what Mike Mew said in his channel. Restically I think it’s possible that getting a over 1 cm of forward growth of maxilla is possible in early 20s/ late teenagers. If you are adult, it’s better to get an appliance to make your Mewing practice easier like Ronald Ead case

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Posted : 04/06/2020 9:22 pm
chiefkeefsosa
Active Member

@basim How many years do you think it will take to get a cm( in the 18-early 20's range)? Ive seen u/helmutstrebl 's results and it looks like he got around a cm in 1.8 years, however his case seems to be the exception not the norm.

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Posted : 04/06/2020 9:41 pm
Basim
Eminent Member

At the very least a minimum of 3 years to see dramatic changes, but the changes are gradual and overtime. Mewing over 6 years will give you great changes like Astro Sky for instance 

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Posted : 04/06/2020 9:58 pm
mr.mewing
Estimable Member

@chiefkeefsosa people also suspect that helmutstrebl guy from using fillers

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Posted : 06/06/2020 6:01 am
heineken
New Member

Hey guys, I wonder if some of you have noticed something similar.

My forehead before mewing looked like example on the left, and after hardmewing for quite some time, it looks more like the one on the right example:

 

What I notice is, is that my hairline looks like it is now higher. I dont think I lost hair in that particular area, but the hairline, esp, in temple area kinda shifted back.

Did some of you notice the same thing?

Does it physically make sense? I achieved quite some forward growth by hardmewing and I assume the skin on the head kinda shifted and adjusted to the new forehead shape.

 

Anyways- my forehead was kinda tall-ish even before that, so I think I will need a hair transplant either way. I just wonder if some of you guys had the same experience when your forehead changed to look more straight vertically rather than more rounded.

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Posted : 06/06/2020 1:41 pm
mr.mewing
Estimable Member

@heineken you have pictures proof?

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Posted : 07/06/2020 5:23 am
noises
Eminent Member

Apparently YouTuber Connor Murphy who usually makes videos about taking his shirt off in front of young women on the street claims to have got visible mewing results in 30 days and coincidentally has reversed some hair loss with scalp massages. This was after he had a mental breakdown following an ayahuasca trip after which he was admitted to a psych ward and now thinks he's a messiah and likens his mewing results to miracles performed by Jesus or something. Either way I overlapped his mewing before & after and it looks like there could be a difference but it's hard to say because the distances are clearly different. Still potentially noteworthy. He says he hard mewed and did bouts of fasting and attributes the results to the GH boost from fasting.  

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Posted : 08/06/2020 5:48 am
moemoe liked
PaperBag
Estimable Member

Why do people ALWAYS take an after pic with facial hair? Not even "this is the only photo I have", they specifically go out of their way to take one as a results photo that causes the viewer to squint to see skin through their beard and imagine what it looks like. Results or not, it's super annoying.

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Posted : 08/06/2020 4:46 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: @paperbag

Why do people ALWAYS take an after pic with facial hair? Not even "this is the only photo I have", they specifically go out of their way to take one as a results photo that causes the viewer to squint to see skin through their beard and imagine what it looks like. Results or not, it's super annoying.

After pics with facial hair should be disregarded

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Posted : 09/06/2020 9:58 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: @noises

Apparently YouTuber Connor Murphy who usually makes videos about taking his shirt off in front of young women on the street claims to have got visible mewing results in 30 days and coincidentally has reversed some hair loss with scalp massages. This was after he had a mental breakdown following an ayahuasca trip after which he was admitted to a psych ward and now thinks he's a messiah and likens his mewing results to miracles performed by Jesus or something. Either way I overlapped his mewing before & after and it looks like there could be a difference but it's hard to say because the distances are clearly different. Still potentially noteworthy. He says he hard mewed and did bouts of fasting and attributes the results to the GH boost from fasting.  

Looks like he touched molars in before and incisors in after. He does have an overbite based on his face structure (looks very short)

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Posted : 09/06/2020 10:01 pm
qwerty135
Eminent Member
Posted by: @progress
Posted by: @mr-mewing

One thing i notice with people that go bald at a young age in my town is that they all have a sloped forehead

 

Yeah that's true. Superimposing your examples, it's intriguing how all other features line up except the eyes & the forehead:

Interesting, reminds me of helmutstrebl's before-after aligned at the forehead:

Many landmarks are static, but between your superimposition of the balding/nonbalding men and helmut's superimposition, it seems both show change in the forehead/soft tissue nasion, the angle of the ears, and the mandibular body. Considering the temporal bone and the mandible's relationship to the temporal bone, as well as the temporalis muscle, I think it's not surprising that a lot of change/difference is visible in a) the brow ridge, b) the mandibular body, and c) the temporal bone's rotation (visible through the ears). Again reinforces my personal belief that tongue posture will ultimately play much less of a role in resolving CFD than proper functioning of the masticatory muscles.

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Posted : 10/06/2020 2:43 am
mr.mewing
Estimable Member

@eddiemoney that guy has mewed whole his life the before and after photos where total bullshit

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Posted : 10/06/2020 2:58 am
harrykanemaxilla
Estimable Member

@eddiemoney

Do you think an overbite can effect facial hair growth a lot more than other malocclusions because the set back mandible hasnt stretched out the skin.

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Posted : 13/06/2020 12:26 pm
Basim
Eminent Member
Posted by: @qwerty135
Posted by: @progress
Posted by: @mr-mewing

One thing i notice with people that go bald at a young age in my town is that they all have a sloped forehead

 

Yeah that's true. Superimposing your examples, it's intriguing how all other features line up except the eyes & the forehead:

Interesting, reminds me of helmutstrebl's before-after aligned at the forehead:

Many landmarks are static, but between your superimposition of the balding/nonbalding men and helmut's superimposition, it seems both show change in the forehead/soft tissue nasion, the angle of the ears, and the mandibular body. Considering the temporal bone and the mandible's relationship to the temporal bone, as well as the temporalis muscle, I think it's not surprising that a lot of change/difference is visible in a) the brow ridge, b) the mandibular body, and c) the temporal bone's rotation (visible through the ears). Again reinforces my personal belief that tongue posture will ultimately play much less of a role in resolving CFD than proper functioning of the masticatory muscles.

What I do notice from people who are balding and the ones who have hair is their neck posture. One thing that keeps intrigues me is that people who have longer necks due to the mandible body being out and allowing the cranial base to balance easier than a person who is recessed also tend to lose less hair because of better blood circulation.

 

Found this video that talks about it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0hzGY6R8rA&t=320s  

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Posted : 21/07/2020 11:16 am