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COLLABORATIVE STUDY BETWEEN DRS. MEW, SQUIRREL BIOLOGISTS, AND BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERS: SAFE, BIOMIMETIC CHEWING TO PREVENT ORTHODONTICS

Tree Curve
(@tree-curve)

 

 

Would the DRs. Mew please contact such experts, who study squirrels? There are researchers at UC Berkeley, California, who are studying the superior movements of squirrels, acknowledging that squirrels can teach humans a lot about biomechanics. They won't have any reason to discipline you for thinking, nor any jurisdiction over you.  A collaborative study with squirrel biologists, who already have funding, would be a clever way around the dental industry's control. THEY COULD PUBLISH AN ARTICLE WHICH SHOWS CHILDREN HOW TO CHEW CORRECTLY FOR ALIGNMENT WITH BIOMECHANICAL FORCE ARROWS PROVING THE EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY. They could test squirrels to see what happens when they are offered a round acorn and a flattened acorn. Which do they NEED to align their constantly erupting incisors?  A slow motion, frame by frame video would show the precise alignment of forces between incisors and molars and the precise hand positioning of the round acorn which, we hypothesize, must be needed to align the incisors. This documentation could be applied to children with erupting incisors, chewing round apples. Dentistry can not dictate that children can't chew a round apple-that's absurd. Ignore that. Proceed with the study, and apply its objective conclusions, scientifically for the benefit of children, who can learn to chew like squirrels. Force meters could be placed on squirrels and children's mandibles to measure a child's ability to improve chewing precision and skills. 

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Topic starter Posted : 23/04/2022 10:54 pm

THE GREAT WORK