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Isolating the masseter muscle  

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Zaco98
New Member

Hi there,

 

Apologies if this is lacking proper terminology, but I was wondering whether anyone has discovered a way to direct chewing efforts more upon the masseter muscles? When I chew I have a much larger effect (and fatigue) in the temporalis muscles, resulting in my forehead becoming wider, and my jaw muscles mostly remaining the same width.

 

Could the level of masseter involvement be increased by jutting the jaw forward? Perhaps chin tucking while chewing?

 

Thanks in advance for any ideas!

Quote
Posted : 30/10/2019 2:20 pm
Zaco98
New Member
Posted by: @zaco98

Hi there,

 

Apologies if this is lacking proper terminology, but I was wondering whether anyone has discovered a way to direct chewing efforts more upon the masseter muscles? When I chew I have a much larger effect (and fatigue) in the temporalis muscles, resulting in my forehead becoming wider, and my jaw muscles mostly remaining the same width.

 

Could the level of masseter involvement be increased by jutting the jaw forward? Perhaps chin tucking while chewing?

 

Thanks in advance for any ideas!

Does anyone have experience with shifting emphasis to the masseter muscles rather than those around the temples? 

 

Thanks!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 11/11/2019 5:38 pm
Progress
Member Moderator

Try to chew in a more clockwise rotating and forwardly positioned manner. The temporalii pull the mandible up and back (CCW), whereas the masseters and pterygoids pull the mandible up and forward (CW). You have likely acquired the habit of favoring the former, so now you need to learn to do the opposite. Visualizing that you are trying to bring your mandible towards the tip of your nose during the chewing motion should get you started. If you are unaccustomed to doing this, you will likely experience a major burn at the pterygoids near the TMJ.

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 11/11/2019 6:49 pm
HyperMewer
Active Member

@progress

Could you elaborate it better please? I have severely hypertrophied temporalis muscles which my friends made fun of.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 11/11/2019 7:12 pm
LizzyBennet
Active Member

@Progress

Interesting theory. I've been chewing my Myo Munchee for a couple of weeks and within days my masseters started growing, which look ridiculous on my tiny face. My temples, on the other hand, are sunken in. It makes sense that this would be the case due to the way I chew, but I just tried out clockwise and anticlockwise chewing, and find it impossible to do either. When I chew it doesn't seem like my jaws move in either of those directions, but more like in a side to side movement.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 11/11/2019 10:42 pm
Progress
Member Moderator

@hypermewer Perhaps the circular illustration was confusing. It may be more convenient to visualize the movement in simple vectors:

 

With excessive temporalis hypertrophy it's likely that you have been overdoing the movement on the left. Hopefully this helps you to understand why it's natural to call it a 'backward bite' - you are essentially biting back and up (and to the sides, like @lizzybennet noted).

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/11/2019 5:13 am
Sean2019 liked
HyperMewer
Active Member
Posted by: @progress

@hypermewer Perhaps the circular illustration was confusing. It may be more convenient to visualize the movement in simple vectors:

 

With excessive temporalis hypertrophy it's likely that you have been overdoing the movement on the left. Hopefully this helps you to understand why it's natural to call it a 'backward bite' - you are essentially biting back and up (and to the sides, like @lizzybennet noted).

So basically what I did before was biting up and down and the right way is to bite only with the lower jaw upwards?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/11/2019 11:13 am
Zaco98
New Member
Posted by: @progress

@hypermewer Perhaps the circular illustration was confusing. It may be more convenient to visualize the movement in simple vectors:

 

With excessive temporalis hypertrophy it's likely that you have been overdoing the movement on the left. Hopefully this helps you to understand why it's natural to call it a 'backward bite' - you are essentially biting back and up (and to the sides, like @lizzybennet noted).

Thanks so much for these interesting replies Progress (and all). Even with your method (if I have understood it correctly) of jutting the lower jaw slightly and chewing in a more circular, grinding fashion I am still feeling and seeing a great deal of activation of the temporalis/temples. Another issue I have with this method is my teeth contact at odd places, making it feel as though I may chip teeth if I am not careful. Please do correct me if I have the above method incorrect.

Perhaps might it be best if so and others in a similar situation took some time off supplemental chewing and allow these areas to 'cool off' before resuming slowly with perfect form?

Many thanks again for such considered responses all.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13/11/2019 6:37 pm
LizzyBennet
Active Member

I have started chewing my Myo Munchee like the left side of Progress’s illustration, and although I am not certain I am doing it right, I definitely don’t feel the burn in my masseters anymore. Previously, chewing the Myo Munchee made my masseters throb and ache while chewing, and sore when I massaged them afterwards. Now my masseters feel nothing. I can’t say I am really feeling much in my temporalii, either 😬, but at least I have stopped growing my masseters.

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 13/11/2019 7:29 pm
Progress
Member Moderator
Posted by: @zaco98
Posted by: @progress

@hypermewer Perhaps the circular illustration was confusing. It may be more convenient to visualize the movement in simple vectors:

 

With excessive temporalis hypertrophy it's likely that you have been overdoing the movement on the left. Hopefully this helps you to understand why it's natural to call it a 'backward bite' - you are essentially biting back and up (and to the sides, like @lizzybennet noted).

Thanks so much for these interesting replies Progress (and all). Even with your method (if I have understood it correctly) of jutting the lower jaw slightly and chewing in a more circular, grinding fashion I am still feeling and seeing a great deal of activation of the temporalis/temples. Another issue I have with this method is my teeth contact at odd places, making it feel as though I may chip teeth if I am not careful. Please do correct me if I have the above method incorrect.

Perhaps might it be best if so and others in a similar situation took some time off supplemental chewing and allow these areas to 'cool off' before resuming slowly with perfect form?

Many thanks again for such considered responses all.

Another reason for uneven activation of the masticatory muscles may be that your occlusion as whole sits too backward. You may find that jutting your jaw forward and biting on something bulky like a rolled up sock activates your masseters better than chewing in your normal occlusion. What I would do in your case (and have done) is forgo chewing until the jaws have grown more forward so that the muscles of mastication are able to engage in a more harmonious manner.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/11/2019 9:15 am
Spaich liked
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