fbpx
Notifications
Clear all

NOTICE:

DO NOT ATTEMPT TREATMENT WITHOUT LICENCED MEDICAL CONSULTATION AND SUPERVISION

This is a public discussion forum. The owners, staff, and users of this website are not engaged in rendering professional services to the individual reader. Do not use the content of this website as an alternative to personal examination and advice from licenced healthcare providers. Do not begin, delay, or discontinue treatments and/or exercises without licenced medical supervision.

Is This The Muscle To Create Hollow Cheeks?

Matt
 Matt
Eminent Member

I came across a thread on a different forum ( https://lookism.net/Thread-Theoretical-exercise-for-cheek-hollows ). The guy explains how the zygomaticus muscles causes the skin to have a hollow look when they bulge through the skin. The muscle runs from the cheekbone to the upper corners of the lip. It is activated when you smile (I think it can be activated from alternative methods as well), they are the muscles which draw the corners of the mouth up. Exercises for this muscle are described in the link above but there are also plenty of videos on YouTube which show how to exercise the muscle.

I have noticed myself, almost every model or attractive person with hollow cheeks have prominent zygomaticus muscles.

[Image: feYnGoEn.jpg]

 

I think it kind of makes sense personally. Most of us already know from looking at Mike Mew's videos that chubby cheeks is also caused from the use buccinators being activated from incorrect swallowing. But I think to achieve hollow cheeks; the zygomaticus muscle needs to be utilized. Although I think other muscles around the mouth can help hollow the skin. And as mewers already know, keeping the tongue against the palate also contributes. 

I've been looking at quite a few videos of celebrities and models with prominent hollow cheeks, and I've caught sight of how they fully utilize their mouth muscles when smiling/talking. I am not 100% sure whether these kind of people naturally get their prominent zygomaticus muscles from using the mouth fully functionally, but I am pretty sure it is due to this because the zygomaticus muscle is activated from using the mouth.

I was wondering whether anyone else has came across this exercise to train this muscle? Would it cause nasolabial folds from exercising it daily?

 

 

 

 
 
Quote
Topic starter Posted : 23/10/2018 6:12 pm
Apollo liked
Apollo
Reputable Member
For reference, here are a handful of forum posts where this has been mentioned. Definition of the zygomaticus muscles does seem to go along with cheek hollows, so hypertrophy of those muscles could be involved in developing that feature. I haven't practiced any of these exercises myself, but I'm interested to try.
 
Posted by: Silver

It's the zygomaticus muscle standing out because of the configuration of everything else.

See  https://lookism.net/Thread-Theoretical-exercise-for-cheek-hollows

https://the-great-work.org/community/case-discussions/my-routine/paged/3/#post-1280

Posted by: Apollo
 
I haven't had dramatic success with increasing my cheek hollows, but mastering the push swallow should help reduce the size of your buccinator muscles. More pronounced zygomatic arches and developed masseter muscles form the outward projection that allows the cheeks to appear recessed, and I've read some people suggest that the zygomaticus major muscle might also play a role. I think keeping your body fat percentage low makes cheek hollows more visible.
Posted by: Bruno K.

Weirdly enough I can safely say that OMC helped me getting more hollow cheeks. In my opinion, the only muscle which hinders hollow cheeks ist the buccinator which only gets trained by false swallowing as described above. You could also have a look at the zygomaticus muscle, which is besides having strong masseter and good cheekbones also benificial for hollow cheeks. Jon Kortajena has a very strong zygomaticus muscle. I think you can hypertrophy the muscle with especially the first and maybe also the second exercise :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMJX0xIWj-w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HixJdP6bUw

Good luck on your journey!

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 23/10/2018 7:05 pm
Skull
Trusted Member

I got error 404 on the site. But those are not prominent zigomaticus muscles, I think they are just prominent cheekbones and great bone structure, you can see that his cheek tissue is very thin

ReplyQuote
Posted : 23/10/2018 7:32 pm
Apollo
Reputable Member
Posted by: Skull

I got error 404 on the site.

Follow the link without the close parenthesis included:

https://lookism.net/Thread-Theoretical-exercise-for-cheek-hollows

ReplyQuote
Posted : 23/10/2018 8:31 pm
Skull liked
EddieMoney
Reputable Member

Those are just robust cheekbones and low bodyfat 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 23/10/2018 10:18 pm
dupreeh liked
auxiliary7
Eminent Member

That's just all kinds of visual manipulation and low body-fat. He wouldn't have the hollow cheeks without the light, angle and image software manipulation. Don't forget the make-up and all kinds of physical stimulations like vacuums, sweat machines that models use. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/10/2018 7:43 am
auxiliary
Reputable Member
Posted by: @apollo
For reference, here are a handful of forum posts where this has been mentioned. Definition of the zygomaticus muscles does seem to go along with cheek hollows, so hypertrophy of those muscles could be involved in developing that feature. I haven't practiced any of these exercises myself, but I'm interested to try.
 
Posted by: Silver

It's the zygomaticus muscle standing out because of the configuration of everything else.

See  https://lookism.net/Thread-Theoretical-exercise-for-cheek-hollows

https://the-great-work.org/community/case-discussions/my-routine/paged/3/#post-1280

Posted by: Apollo
 
I haven't had dramatic success with increasing my cheek hollows, but mastering the push swallow should help reduce the size of your buccinator muscles. More pronounced zygomatic arches and developed masseter muscles form the outward projection that allows the cheeks to appear recessed, and I've read some people suggest that the zygomaticus major muscle might also play a role. I think keeping your body fat percentage low makes cheek hollows more visible.
Posted by: Bruno K.

Weirdly enough I can safely say that OMC helped me getting more hollow cheeks. In my opinion, the only muscle which hinders hollow cheeks ist the buccinator which only gets trained by false swallowing as described above. You could also have a look at the zygomaticus muscle, which is besides having strong masseter and good cheekbones also benificial for hollow cheeks. Jon Kortajena has a very strong zygomaticus muscle. I think you can hypertrophy the muscle with especially the first and maybe also the second exercise :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMJX0xIWj-w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HixJdP6bUw

Good luck on your journey!

 

Buccinator isn't the only muscle to give bloated cheeks, my Risorius muscle is like 1cm in diameter, [Rude Language or Insults are not tolerated]'s thick, I never realized every time I smiled/talked or even ate food I tensed the muscle which also pulled all the skin of my neck upwards, hypertrophying it like crazy. To compare, I felt my zygomaticus and at the very thickest point it's maybe only 1mm in diameter.

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 15/05/2020 4:54 pm
Abdur24
New Member

@eddiemoney wrong, this is what robust cheekbones, with little to no zygomaticus muscle hypertrophy, looks like, notice the cheekbone does not go down to the mouth: 

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/07/2020 11:31 am
AlphaMinus
Estimable Member

I see two things contributing to the hollow cheeks of the guy in the OP. First, he has large, high mass cheekbones that have vertical height and forward projection. That creates the hollow on the sides, where the masseters are. On top of that, he has a forward maxilla and the "smile muscles" (the muscles that kind of make a parenthesis around your mouth) are also prominent, framing the hollowing on the front side as well. In his case, because of the size and height of his cheekbones, the shadowing from the smile muscle connects with the shadowing on the edge of his cheekbones. I have a similar thing, except since my cheekbones are higher with less vertical height, that vertical shadow is much taller. I also suspect that the model in the OP has dimples, which contribute to the hollowing at low body fat %'s. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/08/2020 10:25 am