Notifications
Clear all

NOTICE:

DO NOT ATTEMPT TREATMENT WITHOUT LICENCED MEDICAL CONSULTATION AND SUPERVISION

This is a public discussion forum. The owners, staff, and users of this website are not engaged in rendering professional services to the individual reader. Do not use the content of this website as an alternative to personal examination and advice from licenced healthcare providers. Do not begin, delay, or discontinue treatments and/or exercises without licenced medical supervision.

Let's all argue about whether MSE is better than DNA  

  RSS
greyham
Active Member

I first came across the idea of a forward-pull face mask on this forum in the thread discussing using face mask with MSE for adult expansion. I didn’t end up pursuing MSE, but I thought that if face mask helped MSE users get forward growth, maybe it would help me get more forward growth with Vivos too.

Dr Liao mentions using face mask with DNA appliance patients in his talk at the Vivos Breathing Wellness conference and gives some case reports in his book 6 Foot Tiger, 3 Foot Cage, so I had my mRNA fabricated with hooks for the elastics to support it. I really recommend his book to anyone with obstructive sleep apnea who is wondering what to do about it, by the way.

My dentist is great but he has very little experience with Vivos and his advisor is saying that I should wait until my mandible has moved forward before using the face mask, and only do so at the end of treatment. This makes no sense to me mechanically since the position of the mandible is set by the way it’s teeth mesh with those of the maxilla, and the longer I’m using the face mask, the more forward growth of the maxilla I’m likely to get.

I suspect the advisor is just following the company line that DNA is so good that face mask is unnecessary anyway, but I want to ensure I get maximum forward growth from my appliance use so I don’t need MMA surgery down the track. I’m anticipating that I will be wearing my mRNA appliance for two years, and I don’t want to get to the end of that time and think “I wish I’d started face mask sooner.”

I really relate to the case S.A. in Chapter 12 of Dr Liao’s book, a 57 year old male with obstructive sleep apnea. The timeframe suggests he started face mask immediately. I’ve emailed Dr Liao to confirm at what point he usually starts patients in their face mask, but he’s a busy guy so I’m not expecting a quick response.

If anyone here has used facemask with a DNA appliance, I’m curious if you started at the same time as you got your appliance, or if you waited?

EDIT: If you want to discuss using a forward-pull facemask with a Vivos DNA appliance, maybe do it over on my blog because every discussion of DNA appliances here turns into an argument about MSE vs DNA.

Quote
Posted : 14/10/2020 6:46 pm
mr-sand-man123
Active Member

Not sure if you've seen these interviews with Ronald Ead, but they talk about face mask in adults and how it may only accomplish 1-3mm of forward growth, but the jury is still kind of out on that. Sounds like for some people it works a bit, sometimes it doesn't. It's a lot less reliable in adult males over 30.  Maybe it's worth a shot if you don't mind wearing it but it might be more trouble than it's worth.

https://youtu.be/1_6lqLUKb_k

https://youtu.be/1EQy4OfpcCs

 

The more I research all this stuff, the more I think it's worth the discomfort to just skip all the BS and get MMA surgery. What's worse? Being in pain and discomfort for 6-8 weeks from jaw surgery, or spending over $10K and wasting two years just to find the less invasive option didn't do much and you need jaw surgery anyway?  I'm tempted to just suck it up and go right for the jugular.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 19/10/2020 2:25 pm
toomer
Trusted Member

@mr-sand-man123

I contemplated MMA.  It's not quite just "6-8 weeks and you're done!" unfortunately.

First, they have to move your teeth.  They can't just start cutting into your maxilla with the teeth there, they might kill a root.  So they literally have to move teeth to open up spaces for the cuts.  Say hello to 6-12 months of braces (oh, and probably some root resorption).

Then there's the surgery.  Depending on your age, chances of adverse side effects might be higher.  The oral/maxillofacial surgeon I consulted with basically said something to the effect of "at your age, it's almost certain that you'll lose feeling in your lower lip and chin for the rest of your life".  I'm in my 50's.  Might be different if you're only 20, your body will probably bounce back.

And yes, the recovery is awful.  And you'll have a bite splint and braces and your jaw wired shut, and then braces for longer moving the teeth back to where they were before you started.

Will your insurer pay for the MMA?  If not, it's not going to be cheap.

You don't have to stick out a DNA plan through all 18-24 months.  Most people see enough improvements in 3-6 months that they feel it's worth continuing.  But if you got nothing at all out of it ... you're not obligated to keep using it.

Mostly, what's beneficial is a DNA provider can typically give you an airway scan, and if you think you're a good case - you can be in-treatment and making change for yourself inside of 4 weeks in most cases.  If you decided today you wanted MMA, odds are you wouldn't be having it until Fall or Christmas 2021.

And based on doing an airway scan, you can send the CBCT to an advisor like Dr. Zaghi from the Breath Institute an get a 3rd party opinion on whether DNA might work for you, or if MSE might be better, or if MMA will be the only thing that will fix you.

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 19/10/2020 8:43 pm
greyham liked
greyham
Active Member

@toomer

The ENT I saw said I would need my wisdom teeth removed to make space for the cuts. I was like: "More extractions? I don't think so... that's what led to this whole problem in the first place!" Perhaps he was trying to discourage me since he didn't consider me a candidate anyway due to how far forward he would have to move my upper jaw. He didn't believe it would liberate me from CPAP and wouldn't put a patient through all that without the likelihood of a good result.

@mr-sand-man123

Not everyone is an MMA candidate and as @toomer has pointed out, it's not as easy as you suggest. MSE is much faster than DNA, so there is much less time for bone to remodel while in the face mask. Beware of reading too much into Ronald's videos; he knows a lot about MSE but his opinions on other appliances aren't supported by the science on bone biomechanics.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 19/10/2020 10:25 pm
toomer
Trusted Member
Posted by: @greyham

@toomer

The ENT I saw said I would need my wisdom teeth removed to make space for the cuts.

Yikes!  I hadn't even thought about that as a possibility in terms of moving the teeth around to make space.  No [Rude Language or Insults are not tolerated] way!  

I know of at least one DNA/MRNA patient that ended up having their wisdom teeth erupt and come in (fortunately they came in ok) as a result of treatment.  I'm kind of wondering if mine will.  That would be very interesting/useful in terms of long-term retention of gains.

And then (I forgot to mention) the oral surgeons will all say that MMA has a "95% surgical success rate" for sleep apnea.  It's very carefully phrased.  When you scratch beneath the surface, for them "surgical success" means cutting your AHI by at least 50%.  But in severe sleep apnea cases that might not actually cure you.  My AHI was 41.  20 would be better, but 20 would still be moderate sleep apnea and a lifetime of CPAP.

Ultimately @mr-sand-man123 what I decided was that I did not find the "one perfect protocol" for me.  I'm not sure it's out there.  So instead, I decided to look what I would need to consider if I wanted to try multiple protocols over the next few years - and so as a result of that, I decided I needed to look into sequencing protocols so that they would have the least likelihood of precluding any other subsequent treatments.  So for me, that order ended up being DNA (let's see what the body might be able to do on its own through genetics), then maybe MSE or EASE (let's get a little bit mechanical), and if that doesn't do it, only then MMA (but then hopefully the MMA procedure won't need to achieve as much).

ReplyQuote
Posted : 20/10/2020 12:55 pm
greyham liked
mr-sand-man123
Active Member

@toomer @greyham

I really think it just comes down to personal preference at this point.  Everyone can make arguments to justify their chosen protocol, or to counter someone else's. And then on top of that, everyone's physical features are different so MMA/MSE/DNA might work for one person and not another.

I just feel like if you're going to go through 2 years of DNA, you might as well just spend that time doing MSE/Braces to prepare yourself for MMA (if you need it).  Because MSE/Braces is probably more likely to create the expansion most people are after.  I agree that at your age MSE is not as reliable, but I think with surgical assist it would still work. Granted that's more invasive, but again, I'm not really turned off by short term discomfort like that....I'm happy to endure quite a bit of discomfort if there's a good chance it will solve my problem....there is a lot of discomfort and suffering involved in not being able to sleep well for years, too...and with something like DNA, you're likely going to endure many months of no change, with the chance if it actually doing nothing. So I'm not too keen on potentially wasting a couple of years.

I know Ronald Ead is not reliable on the topic of DNA/Homeoblock, but the ideas I was referring to were discussed by the doctors in his video, Dr. Ting and Dr. Vaughn, who are very experienced with MSE and oral surgery. They both say, in their experience, that facemask in adult men usually achieves 1-3mm....more likely 1 or 2.

And in this video with Dr. Bockow, she says that the procedure she hears the most positive feedback about is actually MMA, and says she hasn't had a single patient that has regretted it.  

I think there's just a lot of scary info out there about MMA, much like all the scary hype about Empty Nose Syndrome....but from the doctors I've spoken to neither are as bad as the rumours. I think a lot of those stories are from more outdated methods and/or bad surgeons. 

@toomer, I understand your reasoning for your plan, and it's definitely not a bad plan, I just worry about someone with an AHI of 40 seeing much of a result from something as mild as DNA. If you're okay with potentially wasting the time and money then I don't think it will hurt to try it. It will probably get you some kind of expansion, even if it isn't significant bone remodelling.  I'm a bit younger and don't really want to waste some of my 'prime' years as a young single guy feeling tired and miserable so I'm a bit less patient to wait for results, which is why I'm feeling the pull towards some more aggressive options.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 20/10/2020 3:52 pm
greyham
Active Member

I've come to pretty much exactly the same conclusion @toomer. All I would add is that at MMA works better when preceded by DOME/MSE (I wish I could find the reference for this), and for MSE to work for 50+ y.o. males like us requires EASE/surgical assist/corticopuncture. Then we can defer the decision to proceed with MMA until after we know what impact DOME/MSE has had.

And yes, obviously removing wisdom teeth in order to do the MMA surgery is going to increase the likelihood of relapse because the jaw will shrink to accomodate the loss of the teeth. The fact that this isn't obvious to the surgeon doing the procedure speaks volumes about the need to do our own research and get second opinions. This isn't the first time that I've come across a doctor who didn't understand even the basics of the very condition and treatment they were supposed to be leading experts in. Other examples include:

  • The ENT surgeon (who my GP said was the "best nose guy in Sydney") telling me that I needed a turbinate reduction to fix my nasal airway resistance because palate expansion wouldn't improve it; even after I sent him masses of research showing that it does.
  • Another ENT surgeon who said I didn't have nasal airway resistance and that the exercises I had been doing would be of no benefit, despite what the research says.
  • The sleep specialist who said the cause of my obstructive sleep apnea was "genetics", that my case was "too complex for him", knew nothing about oral expansion treatments aimed at treating the root cause of the condition he is supposed to be an expert in, and never even asked about other the risk factors I had, like orthodontic extractions, retractive braces, and a diet that didn't encourage jaw development.
  • The world-leading airway-centred orthodontist who said I needed DOME and MMA surgery without seeing Dr Singh's case study of a patient cured of severe sleep apnea with a DNA appliance until I showed it to him.
  • The sleep specialist from Australia's leading sleep disorder research organisation who also wasn't familiar with oral expansion treatments, and whose former colleague has just been sentenced to 6 years jail for sexually assaulting patients at the facility.
  • The many, many GPs I saw over ten years of debilitating chronic fatigue who didn't spot the obvious signs of craniofacial underdevelopment I now know how to recognise which are plainly visible on my face, nor even ask about obstructive sleep apnea risk factors that conventional medicine doesn't yet recognise.

No wonder I'm pissed off about this. These people are supposed to be the experts, but they don't even know the basics of what they are doing every single day. As patients, we come across these conditions once in a lifetime yet we've learned things these doctors don't even know thanks to the research available online. We've just got to be careful separating science from personal opinions on forums like this, which is why I'm grateful for people like @toomer who do their own background research by reading real science before hitting the "Reply" button.

But back to my original question, I saw my dentist yesterday and his objection to starting facemask earlier was that some facemasks push backwards on the lower jaw, which is the opposite of what we want. This is the reason I want to use The Bow. He wanted me to wait a couple of months to see what forward growth I get with mRNA alone but I don't want to be a science experiment so I'm going to start as soon as I can get my hands on it.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 20/10/2020 4:15 pm
toomer liked
greyham
Active Member
Posted by: @mr-sand-man123

... with something like DNA, you're likely going to endure many months of no change, with the chance if it actually doing nothing. So I'm not too keen on potentially wasting a couple of years.

I know Ronald Ead is not reliable on the topic of DNA/Homeoblock, but the ideas I was referring to were discussed by the doctors in his video, Dr. Ting and Dr. Vaughn, who are very experienced with MSE and oral surgery. They both say, in their experience, that facemask in adult men usually achieves 1-3mm....more likely 1 or 2.

And in this video with Dr. Bockow, she says that the procedure she hears the most positive feedback about is actually MMA, and says she hasn't had a single patient that has regretted it.  

You're assuming that DNA is going to fail. Obviously if that's your starting point, it's not going to look very appealing to you. I do agree though that since you're relatively young, you have a different risk profile that makes MMA much more attractive.

I would be wary of listening to doctors when they are speaking about treatments that have no experience with; in fact, I'd still be a little wary even when they do, as per my pervious post. I'm sure Drs Ting, Vaugh and Bockow are excellent at MSE and oral surgery but as far as I'm aware they have no experience with DNA/Homeoblock and their opinions on it are as speculative as those in the comments under Ronald's YouTube interviews.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 20/10/2020 5:13 pm
Limebike
Eminent Member
Posted by: @mr-sand-man123

@toomer @greyham

I really think it just comes down to personal preference at this point.  Everyone can make arguments to justify their chosen protocol, or to counter someone else's. And then on top of that, everyone's physical features are different so MMA/MSE/DNA might work for one person and not another.

I just feel like if you're going to go through 2 years of DNA, you might as well just spend that time doing MSE/Braces to prepare yourself for MMA (if you need it).  Because MSE/Braces is probably more likely to create the expansion most people are after.  I agree that at your age MSE is not as reliable, but I think with surgical assist it would still work. Granted that's more invasive, but again, I'm not really turned off by short term discomfort like that....I'm happy to endure quite a bit of discomfort if there's a good chance it will solve my problem....there is a lot of discomfort and suffering involved in not being able to sleep well for years, too...and with something like DNA, you're likely going to endure many months of no change, with the chance if it actually doing nothing. So I'm not too keen on potentially wasting a couple of years.

I know Ronald Ead is not reliable on the topic of DNA/Homeoblock, but the ideas I was referring to were discussed by the doctors in his video, Dr. Ting and Dr. Vaughn, who are very experienced with MSE and oral surgery. They both say, in their experience, that facemask in adult men usually achieves 1-3mm....more likely 1 or 2.

And in this video with Dr. Bockow, she says that the procedure she hears the most positive feedback about is actually MMA, and says she hasn't had a single patient that has regretted it.  

I think there's just a lot of scary info out there about MMA, much like all the scary hype about Empty Nose Syndrome....but from the doctors I've spoken to neither are as bad as the rumours. I think a lot of those stories are from more outdated methods and/or bad surgeons. 

@toomer, I understand your reasoning for your plan, and it's definitely not a bad plan, I just worry about someone with an AHI of 40 seeing much of a result from something as mild as DNA. If you're okay with potentially wasting the time and money then I don't think it will hurt to try it. It will probably get you some kind of expansion, even if it isn't significant bone remodelling.  I'm a bit younger and don't really want to waste some of my 'prime' years as a young single guy feeling tired and miserable so I'm a bit less patient to wait for results, which is why I'm feeling the pull towards some more aggressive options.

You mentioned Ron's interview with Dr. Bockow: I have to say I was quite disappointed with her viewpoints. She equated acrylic expanders with a Hyrax that was mounted ONLY on the molars (no acrylic coverage) and no other teeth and tried to push the conclusion that you get more dental tipping in the molars. Moreover, in the figure where she was comparing the splitting of the suture with a Hyrax on an young adult, she was downplaying the split that obviously occurred. Recall that you may not get a perfectly parallel expansion like with MSE due to the missing bicortical engagement, but to be honest, some patients only need expansion in the lower maxilla and do not have any problems breathing through the nose to begin with. In such cases, it could even be beneficial to not get an expansion of the nose, which can be rather dramatic (see a video by Marianna Evans where she expanded a female whose nose got wider by a lot).

Then, she recommended surgical assist with every MSE adult case, which is obviously much more invasive than trying it without first or just using corticopuncture. In general, she did not seem very imaginative and even logic in her arguments.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 20/10/2020 6:36 pm
toomer and greyham liked
toomer
Trusted Member
Posted by: @mr-sand-man123

I understand your reasoning for your plan, and it's definitely not a bad plan, I just worry about someone with an AHI of 40 seeing much of a result from something as mild as DNA. If you're okay with potentially wasting the time and money then I don't think it will hurt to try it. It will probably get you some kind of expansion, even if it isn't significant bone remodelling.  I'm a bit younger and don't really want to waste some of my 'prime' years as a young single guy feeling tired and miserable so I'm a bit less patient to wait for results, which is why I'm feeling the pull towards some more aggressive options.

Yep.  Everyone has to pick the path that seems right to them.  For me, I've been encouraged by sleep apnea results that Dr. Singh has published on many different occasions.  In a pair of recent studies, for mild and moderate cases (so AHI under 30) they achieved about a 72% "cure" rate (AHI below 5) ... and for severe cases the cure rate was definitely lower at 20% (including some patients at AHI 40 like me), but 73% saw their AHI at least cut by 50% or more.  

So all in all, it does seem like it has some efficacy.  But this is why Vivos has only filed with the FDA to market DNA as a potential cure at mild-to-moderate levels.

I wish you luck in your journey!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 20/10/2020 8:45 pm
toomer
Trusted Member
Posted by: @limebike

She equated acrylic expanders with a Hyrax that was mounted ONLY on the molars (no acrylic coverage) and no other teeth and tried to push the conclusion that you get more dental tipping in the molars.

Wait, seriously?  I didn't watch the video, because I already knew what the conclusion was going to be ... but, wow.  That's just negligent.  I mean, I thought she would have at least used something like a Schwartz for comparison...

This makes me doubt whether she has any grasp of the differences between a "mechanical" appliance, vs. a more "functional" one.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 20/10/2020 9:09 pm
Limebike
Eminent Member

@toomer

I fully agree.

Here is the part: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQnCIUQjMAU

Check out the segment starting at 3:30, as well as the segment starting at 8:57.

Regarding the stimulation of the suture, in the segment starting at 8:57, she is furthermore using the illustrations in a very misleading way. For example, she is downplaying the case B, which is similar to a normal acrylic expander. If you look at the precise color coding, in B you may have 0.008 GPa, while in the case B (the MSE), you have 0.010 GPa.

I wouldn't recommend anyone who knows something about these things to be treated by her. Very rigid, and frankly low IQ doctor.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/10/2020 2:38 pm
mr-sand-man123
Active Member
Posted by: @limebike

I wouldn't recommend anyone who knows something about these things to be treated by her. Very rigid, and frankly low IQ doctor.

lol. She's probably one of the most reputable orthodontists, but okay. Maybe we should be consulting you instead?

 

The reason a lot of these MSE orthodontists don't have experience with DNA isn't from a lack of understanding, it's because they know the science is questionable and therefore have chosen not to adopt it.   You can talk about 'functional appliances' and 'biomemetics' all day but the fact remains there is very little proof of any of their claims. The best examples we have are a few anecdotal cases online of people claiming they feel better, which could be attributed to other factors as well. Where are all the side by side scans?  There are thousands of Vivos cases out there but no solid before and after examples of new bone or expanded nasal airway. All we have are Dr. Singh's presentations from several years ago that are just as sketchy and one-sided as any MSE doctor talking about their side of the debate.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/10/2020 4:45 pm
toomer
Trusted Member

@limebike

Excellent catch.  Yeah, I'm not an expert on that ... but I was thinking to myself "wait, I'm seeing action at the suture ... in something you just described as an acrylic appliance - which Ronald says won't work".  

And then she later said she thought the cases were adults (she didn't seem 100% sure - which is also a problem if she doesn't even know her data well enough that she's presenting).

What's GPa, do you happen to know?

IMO, her analysis there is actually somewhat positive for DNA.  And this type of study method that she mentions - "Finite Element Analysis" - I've heard Dr. Singh make references to doing the same in some of his studies and research.  I might see if I can try to track down the original research paper on that one.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/10/2020 4:47 pm
greyham
Active Member
Posted by: @mr-sand-man123

the science is questionable 

I'm glad you've finally mentioned science, and note that you haven't cited any.

You'll find the side-by-side scans in publications about DNA appliance cases if you bother to look for them. It's not our job to educate you.

Where are the research papers to support your position?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/10/2020 4:55 pm
Limebike
Eminent Member

@mr-sand-man123

Think what you will. I have no stake in DNA or Vivos (I actually find it shady as hell as well).

I am treating myself by fabricating my own clear aligners and my own acrylic expanders and have expanded maxilla by 4 mm in 1 month. I am in my 30s and immediately got a central diastema with evidence that this was bone-borne expansion in the lower maxilla where the expansion tapers towards the nose. I did not want parallel expansion as I already have very good nasal breathing now and did not want a wider nose.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/10/2020 6:42 pm
Limebike
Eminent Member

@mr-sand-man123

Also, regarding her strong support of surgery: Have you seen the case that she used in the video? The motivation was that the female patient was not able to bring her lips together. The after photos of the patient showed that same patient failing at just that: her lips are wide apart, i.e., the exact opposite of the treatment goal. Within a few minutes, Dr. Bockow obviously completely forgot what the starting point and the objecte was. I don't know what else to call this but low IQ.

I have seen so many cases where low IQ doctors would have immediately said surgery would be the only solution and where it obviously is not the case. You can't trust most of them and that is why I am taking it into my own hand. If you want your case to be solved properly, you have to do it yourself.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/10/2020 9:07 pm
Limebike
Eminent Member
Posted by: @limebike

@toomer

I fully agree.

Here is the part: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQnCIUQjMAU

Check out the segment starting at 3:30, as well as the segment starting at 8:57.

Regarding the stimulation of the suture, in the segment starting at 8:57, she is furthermore using the illustrations in a very misleading way. For example, she is downplaying the case B, which is similar to a normal acrylic expander. If you look at the precise color coding, in B you may have 0.008 GPa, while in the case B (the MSE), you have 0.010 GPa.

I wouldn't recommend anyone who knows something about these things to be treated by her. Very rigid, and frankly low IQ doctor.

GPa = Giga Pascal, a unit for pressure

0.008 GPa is just 20% shy of 0.010 GPa. I don't think that 20% matter at all clinically speaking... What distinguishes the MSE is the parallel expansion through the guidance provided by the bicortical engagement of the expansion screw.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/10/2020 9:21 pm
toomer
Trusted Member
Posted by: @limebike

GPa = Giga Pascal, a unit for pressure

0.008 GPa is just 20% shy of 0.010 GPa. I don't think that 20% matter at all clinically speaking... What distinguishes the MSE is the parallel expansion through the guidance provided by the bicortical engagement of the expansion screw.

I assumed it was some sort of pressure/force measurement.

And what's interesting, is that in B it seems like the force is very nicely focused directly into the suture and almost nowhere else.  It makes me want to know exactly what that appliance was!  Maybe I need to hunt down this "Lee, et. al. 2002" study.

In A and C, there's a lot of spill over in force where the anchor screws would be.  Seems a bit sloppier to me.  I'll take 80% of very-well-directed force over 100% force that is less well controlled.

(I just went and trolled Ronald on this on his video, I wonder if he will respond)

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/10/2020 9:41 pm
Limebike
Eminent Member

@toomer case B is a TAD-mounted acrylic expander. 

See this video: https://www.pathlms.com/pcso/events/1648/video_presentations/143837

When I looked into it, I noticed that the TADs have the sole purpose of anchoring the acrylic. You can achieve the same effect by a basic acrylic expander where you remove the acrylic touching teeth and use whatever type of clasps (e.g., triangular clasps) to have something to grip on so that the expander does not fall out (which it should not anyways if you activate the screw and have it exert pressure on your palate).

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/10/2020 9:51 pm
toomer
Trusted Member
Posted by: @limebike

@toomer case B is a TAD-mounted acrylic expander. 

See this video: https://www.pathlms.com/pcso/events/1648/video_presentations/143837

When I looked into it, I noticed that the TADs have the sole purpose of anchoring the acrylic. You can achieve the same effect by a basic acrylic expander where you remove the acrylic touching teeth and use whatever type of clasps (e.g., triangular clasps) to have something to grip on so that the expander does not fall out (which it should not anyways if you activate the screw and have it exert pressure on your palate).

 

It sounds like it actually follows with the DNA and Homeoblock strategy then.  It's in the initial patent that Drs. Belfor and Singh created - the point was to shave down the acrylic to achieve the right contact - which I would assume making sure it's not imparting force directly into the teeth, and instead into the palate.  

Actually, just went and watched the video, and those looked like permanently mounted rapid expanders.  Not removable acrylic expanders.  I guess the anchorage is the key question.  Interesting.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/10/2020 10:18 pm
Limebike
Eminent Member

@toomer I did not say that the TAD-mounted expander is removable though 🙂 I made my own removable version with the same effect. No need to drill screws in my palate if it is not absolutely necessary.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 21/10/2020 10:38 pm
toomer
Trusted Member

@limebike

So pondering through it - aside from the anchorage, it seems like a question of how forces are directed.  With MSE it seems like the force is directed inwards directly at the suture to pull it open.  With the acrylic TAD device that she showed (which seemed like it was 80% as effective as generating force at the suture line, per the GPa scale shown) the force seems to be more pushing the walls of the palate outward ... which then also creates pressure in the suture to expand.

So yes, I can see her point that the MSE is perhaps more effective at imparting mechanical force directly into the suture.  That's fine.  But even she was rather measured in her phrasing when she described appliance B, she just said it was "less" ... which is technically true, but not necessarily to a meaningful degree if it's only 20%.

I guess that only leaves anchorage as they key, and as long as you can solve that and not impart any forces into the teeth in a harmful way ... one might expect/hope to get a moderate amount of expansion with the acrylic appliance with no forces directed into the teeth.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 22/10/2020 9:18 am
Limebike
Eminent Member

@toomer See the chopstick analogy by Won Moon: https://youtu.be/w7D3l3X2B5g?t=1155

ReplyQuote
Posted : 22/10/2020 11:41 am
toomer liked
cliffbars
Active Member

@greyham Have you looked into the Biobloc? 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/10/2020 4:42 pm
greyham
Active Member
Posted by: @cliffbars

@greyham Have you looked into the Biobloc? 

Yes. It appears to be aimed largely at children, and I'm an adult.

Dr Singh, the inventor of the mRNA appliance I'm using, is one of the co-authors on a couple of studies demonstrating Biobloc's effectiveness.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/10/2020 8:25 pm
cliffbars
Active Member

@greyham Interesting. I've heard Mike and John Mew saying that the Biobloc has worked on adults as well, in conjunction with mewing. Keep us posted on your treatment. I'm hoping you make a break through with that DNA + FM combo.

Questions:

What are the main differences between the DNA and mRNA?

What ultimately led you to use the appliance you are using, since I know there is variation within the Vivos appliances.

Did you ever consider the Homeoblock, and if you're knowledgeable, are they any different? (look pretty similar to me)

What will you be doing post mRNA? (Braces, Inivisalign, Retainers, Myofunctional Therapy, etc) I've always been intrigued to know if DNA and Homeoblock users are able to maintain their gains with tongue posture.

Has your doc told you the expectations of your treatment, i.e. 1mm forward growth, 4mm lateral expansion, airway expansion, etc

I'd also like to know your opinion on MSE. I believe MSE is in vogue right now, however, I feel like in several years there may be stories coming out of the side effects of MSE, due to the super aggressive expansion that it is. It absolutely manhandles the upper palate, and I don't think you need to necessarily split the suture for growth. I believe MSE has the potential to be traumatic and affect the body in a negative way. I think I heard John Mew say this somewhere as well. 

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/10/2020 8:30 pm
greyham
Active Member

@cliffbars

I can't see any reason why Biobloc couldn't work on adults, but it's a more basic device than the DNA appliance(s) and I haven't seen any published studies where it has been used to cure obstructive sleep apnea in adults, whereas I have for DNA.

Thanks, I hope so too. You can follow my treatment most reliably by subscribing to the newsletter on my blog.

mRNA incorporates mandibular advancement. DNA does not.

My choice of mRNA is mostly explained in my article Is The Vivos DNA/mRNA Appliance Too Good To Be True?.

Yes, I considered Homeoblock and had a consultation with Dr Belfor. I wrote an article on the difference between Homeoblock and DNA in anticipation of your question.

I am doing Myofunctional Therapy exercises daily. I will evaluate whether I need further orthodontic treatment after mRNA is finished. My long-term plan is to get my extraction spaces replaced with implant to prevent the jaws shrinking, maintain my health and make my appearance what nature intended. I expect to need to wear the appliance for life to maintain the gains.

My dentist said that I'm an ideal obstructive sleep apnea candidate for Vivos. I didn't ask about dimensions because I know he has no experience and would be making the answer up. I suppose I could ask him what his advisor said. I don't care about dimensions so long as I can sleep properly. I expect that I will stop needing to use CPAP sometime during the treatment, but I'm not sure exactly when.

MSE is much more aggressive and rapid than DNA, and I'm in my 50s so my risk tolerance is low. If Vivos fails for me, my next step is likely to be MSE or DOME, then MMA. I did a lot of research into MSE, and the science on bone remodelling implies that you don't need to split the suture in order to expand the maxilla. I will write a more detailed article about why I chose mRNA over MSE when I have time.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/10/2020 10:08 pm
cliffbars
Active Member

@greyham Your website is great, I can tell you put in a load of work and research. For the wearing the appliance for the rest of your life part, do you think if a youngster used something like a DNA or Homeoblock they could get away with mewing to help stabilize the results and get further gains? I'd also probably avoid getting any orthodontic work done after your treatment as there is always risk with retraction from any type of orthodontics. Read your blog, best wishes on your treatment mate, finally get rid of that cpap haha! I will be cheering for you.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/10/2020 11:13 pm
greyham
Active Member
Posted by: @cliffbars

@greyham Your website is great, I can tell you put in a load of work and research. For the wearing the appliance for the rest of your life part, do you think if a youngster used something like a DNA or Homeoblock they could get away with mewing to help stabilize the results and get further gains? I'd also probably avoid getting any orthodontic work done after your treatment as there is always risk with retraction from any type of orthodontics. Read your blog, best wishes on your treatment mate, finally get rid of that cpap haha! I will be cheering for you.

Thank you, I'm glad you enjoyed it and appreciate the cheers; I can hear them from here.

I expect that a youngster who is properly treated with any expansive appliance will not need any further treatment to stabilise the result once they mature, but they may still need to adopt a paleo-style diet such as Dr Steven Lin's Dental Diet since the typical western diet, which probably caused their problem in the first place, is too soft. I stopped using my custom-fitted mandibular advancement device shortly after starting CPAP because I thought its tight fit would counteract any gains I got from mewing. After 9 months of mewing the MAD didn't fit any more.

Orthodontics is fine if it's not used to mask an orthopedic problem. For instance, using expansive orthodontics in a growing youngster to generate orthopedic expansion is likely to be the safest and most effective way to correct underdeveloped jaws, which is an orthopedic problem.

Using retractive orthodontics to mask an orthopedic problem, on the other hand, (which is what happened to me) is likely to lead to a disaster. I've heard that this is still standard practice by many orthodontists but I have no first-hand experience with that since my treatment was 39 years ago.

As an example: I have heard of an orthodontist using Invisalign to generate orthopedic expansion, but by default Invisalign is retractive. They even have a marketing video which demonstrates retraction as if they think it's a good thing.

I will only go to an orthodontist who understands airway and will ensure that whatever is done is expansive, rather than retractive.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/10/2020 11:59 pm
toomer
Trusted Member

@cliffbars,

Adding on to what @greyham said ... in regards to wearing the appliance for the rest of one's life, it's a bit unclear ... and certainly, we don't have enough long-term data to be sure as Dr. Singh only started building DNA appliances for people like a decade ago, so it's hard to know for certain.  But they do state in some of their marketing material that they believe that many patients may not need any future use of the appliance.  But they are cautious in their phrasing.  I would assume that this assumes that ideal myofunctional/oral posture is achieved (and maintained) by the patient.

Having said that, for sleep apnea patients like @greyham and me -- we're already sentenced to a lifetime of CPAP anyway at this point, so a lifetime of nighttime retainer use (and no CPAP) is a welcome tradeoff.

Personally, I have spoken to some DNA patients post-treatment who kept wearing it, and others that stopped.  Of the one that stopped, she still felt like she had retained "about 85%" of the gains she achieved by going through treatment in her own words.  It's a subjective number and not scientific ... but she got wrapped up in 2016 or 2017 so this is multiple years post-treatment.

Some of the leading treating dentists in the Vivos ecosystem that treated themselves still wear their appliances - folks like Dr. Bennett and Dr. Liao. Dr. Liao has also published a case study of a patient of his 5-years post-treatment, and their airway gains were still there - but there was no clarity on whether the patient was instructed to keep wearing the device after all expansion had been completed.  My assumption would be that the patient did keep wearing it nightly.   Or at least once every few nights.  A single night missed probably isn't going to cause any significant risk relapse ... but months or years of non-wearing might, especially if you don't have ideal oral posture and the cheeks are placing pressure against the upper arch that isn't countered by the tongue being in the right place.

This topic of potential relapse is where folks who are keen on MSE will come in and say that lifetime use of the retainer is clearly indicating that DNA is just "dental" expansion, not "skeletal".  But those same advocates of MSE either ignore (or are unaware of) the fact that I think Dr. Moon himself said that MSE is only about 70% skeletal, so some relapse could happen there too.  Dr. Singh clearly doesn't believe DNA is only dental, and he has presented evidence which he thinks disproves that. But some people will believe that unless their treatment is "absolutely manhandling the upper palate" (love that description!) that it can't possibly work.

The other problem in the discussion, is that people are forcing the discussion to take place on the MSE "playing field" if you will ... as if the way MSE measures is the only correct way to measure.  But Dr. Singh not only believes that light stretching forces over time can increase the midplatal suture, but he also believes that the periodontal ligaments around your teeth also behave like sutures and create bone.  So he believes there's a little bit of bone growth happening in a lot of different places ... all of which add up to more airway volume.  He doesn't believe in just measuring mm's of split at the suture.  

Critics of DNA will use this to claim his product is a fraud or just pushing teeth, but Dr. Singh has spent most of his professional career studying the behavior of cranial sutures and craniofacial development, and treating craniofacial deficiencies.  Personally, I think he may be onto something much more so than someone like Galella who invented AGGA.  At a bare minimum, at least Dr. Singh has attempted to (and succeeded at) getting some of his research into peer-reviewed journals.  I don't think I have ever seen anything about AGGA in any peer-reviewed journal ever ... not from Galella, not from FBI, nor from LVI.

In terms of curing sleep apnea, though ... DNA absolutely seems effective, and Vivos has submitted data to the FDA to gain approval to say just that, that they are an effective "potential" cure for mild to moderate cases of sleep apnea.  The FDA won't grant them license to do that, unless they are convinced by the data.  So we could have some interesting developments in the next 3-6 months on that.

What's disappointing to see, is that as easy as it is to do sleep tests - Dr. Moon has never seen fit to see if his technique helps cure sleep apnea.  He just says "well our patients say they breathe better through their noses" ... well, guess what?  Nearly every DNA patient ends up saying the exact same thing.  So when it comes to sleep apnea use cases, it seems like DNA is probably the best positioned in the market right now.

And the other thing that bothers me about MSE is the "manhandling" of the upper palate in such a short time, when absolutely nothing is being done to the mandible.  Sure, there's chewing, and Dr. Moon says you use braces ... but you're trying to get 3, 4, 5mm of lateral width in like 4-6 weeks and expecting the lower to keep up?  To me, that seems more risky.  So I like the fact that DNA typically advocates appliances in upper and lower, so that growth and coordination of the arches can hopefully occur together over a slow period of time.

 

 

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 25/10/2020 2:29 pm
greyham and cliffbars liked
Limebike
Eminent Member

Has any of you people who swear by Vivos thought about the fact that this so-called "mRNA appliance" is directly pulling back your maxillae if you sleep on your backs?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 25/10/2020 7:53 pm
greyham
Active Member
Posted by: so-called “@limebike“

Has any of you people who swear by Vivos thought about the fact that this so-called "mRNA appliance" is directly pulling back your maxillae if you sleep on your backs?

I don’t “swear by Vivos” but I did choose a “so-called” mRNA to treat my OSA after doing a lot of research to decide what option was best for me. Yes, like all mandibular advancement devices, my mandible can pull backwards on my maxilla, especially if I lie on my back. Unlike conventional MADs though, I hopefully don’t have to wear the mRNA for life; at least, not with the MAD function in place. I have a T-shirt with a tennis ball sown in the back I can wear to prevent me sleeping on my back.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/10/2020 7:30 am
toomer
Trusted Member
Posted by: @limebike

Has any of you people who swear by Vivos thought about the fact that this so-called "mRNA appliance" is directly pulling back your maxillae if you sleep on your backs?

So ... sleep on your side during your treatment period, and then it's not really a big deal?

I mean seriously - we're talking about major craniofacial problems, which would probably otherwise require complete double jaw surgery to treat ... and you're complaining that someone might not be able to sleep on their back for a year or so while they're going through treatment?

This doesn't seem like all that significant of a problem to me?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/10/2020 11:15 am
Limebike
Eminent Member

@toomer If sleeping on your side completely prevents the backwards pull on the maxilla (as a reaction to the forwards pull of the mandible), why do you have the mandibular advancement mechanism in the first place? Think about it.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/10/2020 2:18 pm
toomer
Trusted Member

@limebike

These can be deployed a lot of different ways, depending on any individual patient's needs.  For example, the provider I am working with does not use the MRNA at all.  Many patients are treated with only DNA.  The indexed occlusal pads over the molars seem to help decompress the TMJs and I think this action kind of "kicks" the mandible along in front of the maxilla as the maxilla is doing it's remodeling.  That's one of the things that needs to be adjusted by the treating dentists every month (as well as shaving any of the other acrylic down so that you're not making contact in an area you don't want to - kind of like what you have been doing with your approach).

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/10/2020 2:34 pm
Limebike
Eminent Member

@toomer Well in that case we are back at a perfectly standard acrylic expander. This brings me to my point that Vivos is simply selling a standard acrylic expander (with fancy patented outer-space looking springs) and this and that to the OSA-suffering community. The rest is hot air and a bunch of phony marketing with the genetic programming crap and so many people fall for it and attribute all sorts of pseudo-scientific, magic processes to it.

Any appliance exerting pressure on teeth to move them is leveraging bone resorption and deposition (which at the cellular level involves the genome, like, basically, any other process in the body...?). To highlight this trivial aspect and make it the main selling point to desperate patients suffering from OSA in some kind of a marketing campaign is just disgusting to me.

Anyways, I won't comment any further on this Vivos DNA, mRNA topic but felt I had to say something as I see people obviously falling prey to these marketing shenanigans and attributing all sorts of magic properties to it.

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/10/2020 4:08 pm
drunkwithcoffee
Estimable Member

@greyham how's DNA working out for you so far?  I remember you posted about a blog somewhere - have you updated it recently, and what was the link?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/10/2020 4:43 pm
toomer
Trusted Member
Posted by: @limebike

@toomer Well in that case we are back at a perfectly standard acrylic expander. 

Except that for some reason ... this one is curing mild and moderate sleep apnea patients more than half of the time: https://austinpublishinggroup.com/sleep-disorders/fulltext/ajsd-v1-id1002.php

There's a hundred other acrylic oral appliances on the market.  If they're all just the same, then why wasn't sleep apnea getting cured a couple decades ago that way?  No one "likes" their CPAP.

I dunno ... maybe Dr. Singh just faked all that data in the peer-reviewed journals?  Yeah, that could be.  But the only problem with that theory is, I actually know someone personally who had their moderate-to-severe (AHI 26) sleep apnea clinically cured.  I've seen their reports myself.  It's what got me started looking.

And if you actually spend some time to look ... it's actually not all that hard to find good evidence of efficacy in treating OSA.  Heck, you can even even find random YouTubers talking about it and sharing their WatchPAT-1 reports.  Here you go, see the reports for yourself - AHI of 10.1 to 1.8 in less than 12 months: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0lwhTcVJLM&t=1m30s (and pRDI which is likely indicating some UARS was cut in half as well).

But, hey ... you can just continue to believe that "they are all the same".  That's your right.  Obviously, some of us that have dug into the details think a bit differently.

And hey, who knows - maybe in 3-6 months you'll be able to come back and gloat about your messages here?  Because Vivos filed with the FDA to market their appliance as a potential cure for mild and moderate sleep apnea (what is known has "class II" premarket authorization for a medical device).  And with that type of class-II application is a requirement for submitting a whole lot of proof of efficacy for the FDA to review.  So if Dr. Singh's data is all fake and what not ... I'm sure the FDA will turn down their application and you can come back here and tell everyone how right you were.

(or ... maybe it will turn out that you were wrong.) 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/10/2020 5:55 pm
Limebike
Eminent Member

@toomer Any acrylic expander aimed at creating enough tongue space and facilitating good oral posture will cure sleep apnea.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 26/10/2020 6:40 pm
greyham
Active Member
Posted by: @drunkwithcoffee

@greyham how's DNA working out for you so far?  I remember you posted about a blog somewhere - have you updated it recently, and what was the link?

I'm about 4 weeks in. It's early days yet, but it's going OK, thanks for asking. My next step is getting a facemask going. I'll post an update when I have something to report.

I just posted this article which should stoke the fire of this conversation: Why I Chose DNA over Homeoblock, MSE, DOME, MMA and AGGA

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/10/2020 2:39 am
greyham
Active Member
Posted by: @limebike

@toomer If sleeping on your side completely prevents the backwards pull on the maxilla (as a reaction to the forwards pull of the mandible), why do you have the mandibular advancement mechanism in the first place? Think about it.

So that when the muscles of the jaw relax completely during sleep, the resting position of the lower jaw is far enough forwards to keep the airway open.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/10/2020 2:42 am
greyham
Active Member
Posted by: @toomer

Here you go, see the reports for yourself - AHI of 10.1 to 1.8 in less than 12 months: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0lwhTcVJLM&t=1m30s

That's a pretty compelling video.

Here's one for the Homeoblock denialists: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5S5AZ50pAE  

Ronald Ead describes it as "amazing" in the comments, yet he still went on to ridicule James Nestor's success with the appliance on his channel.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/10/2020 2:51 am
toomer
Trusted Member
Posted by: @greyham

That's a pretty compelling video.

Here's one for the Homeoblock denialists: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5S5AZ50pAE  

Ronald Ead describes it as "amazing" in the comments, yet he still went on to ridicule James Nestor's success with the appliance on his channel.

That's interesting, I had not come across that one before.  That's pretty cool that as a dentist he was very conscious about photos and scans and made sure they were always done with the same lighting, with the same technician/camera, etc. ... and then he time-lapsed them really well!

This is actually the first example where it clearly looks like "counterclockwise rotation" of the maxilla is taking place?

What's also really interesting is that if he's being honest - it was the exact same camera and lighting for all photos ... his skin gets way better.  In the initial photo of the time lapse, he has more of an overall "grayish" hue to his skin, which certainly isn't unusual for a man his age.  But in the later photos his skin has a much healthier pinkish hint to it.  Again, immediately I would think "lighting" - but if he was being honest about the capture of the photos, then lighting doesn't account for it.

It's also interesting because if you look at his pre-treatment time lapses where he uses his professional headshots over time ... you can actually see he's going through a bit of a "face melt" ... face is getting longer/narrower, as presumably his maxillary arch is slowly collapsing inward.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/10/2020 9:44 am
greyham liked
Limebike
Eminent Member
Posted by: @greyham
Posted by: @limebike

@toomer If sleeping on your side completely prevents the backwards pull on the maxilla (as a reaction to the forwards pull of the mandible), why do you have the mandibular advancement mechanism in the first place? Think about it.

So that when the muscles of the jaw relax completely during sleep, the resting position of the lower jaw is far enough forwards to keep the airway open.

I am not sure you are understanding. Either your natural mandible position is forward or something has to push the mandible forward. Since you are anchoring on the maxilla, the push effect from the mandible comes from pulling on the maxilla. Over the long run, you are going to pull your maxilla down and back.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/10/2020 1:33 pm
mr-sand-man123
Active Member
Posted by: @toomer
Posted by: @greyham

That's a pretty compelling video.

Here's one for the Homeoblock denialists: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5S5AZ50pAE  

Ronald Ead describes it as "amazing" in the comments, yet he still went on to ridicule James Nestor's success with the appliance on his channel.

That's interesting, I had not come across that one before.  That's pretty cool that as a dentist he was very conscious about photos and scans and made sure they were always done with the same lighting, with the same technician/camera, etc. ... and then he time-lapsed them really well!

This is actually the first example where it clearly looks like "counterclockwise rotation" of the maxilla is taking place?

What's also really interesting is that if he's being honest - it was the exact same camera and lighting for all photos ... his skin gets way better.  In the initial photo of the time lapse, he has more of an overall "grayish" hue to his skin, which certainly isn't unusual for a man his age.  But in the later photos his skin has a much healthier pinkish hint to it.  Again, immediately I would think "lighting" - but if he was being honest about the capture of the photos, then lighting doesn't account for it.

It's also interesting because if you look at his pre-treatment time lapses where he uses his professional headshots over time ... you can actually see he's going through a bit of a "face melt" ... face is getting longer/narrower, as presumably his maxillary arch is slowly collapsing inward.

That definitely is not the same lighting, and it's also not a timelapse....it's just a morph between two images, which can be a bit misleading because it gradually blends between the two. A timelapse would consist of hundreds of different images and you would see every change along the way instead of blending between the before and after. 

The hue of his skin is 100% lighting or color correction. I'm a photographer/videographer so I have a fair bit of knowledge about this stuff. They either color corrected the images by adding saturation to the 'after' or desaturating the 'before', or they simply had different lighting because the orange hue in the 'before' image is from a tungsten light source (which is 3200 kelvin), and the other image is most definitely not 3200 kelvin, it looks to be closer to daylight (5200k), or some kind of white fluorescent light.  This is particularly noticeable if you look at his hair and the light on the edge of his face. The 'after' image has a greenish/yellow tone in the hair, which clearly shows it's a difference in lighting/color. The color of his orange skin, and the yellow hue in his hair, particularly in the profile angle, looks to me like it had the saturation boosted. His skin tone and yellow in his hair looks unnaturally saturated.  And if it didn't, then it had different lighting and/or different white balance settings on the camera. You can change an image from having that orange tone, to a more neutral gray tone simple by changing the white balance settings on the camera. Whoever took these photos could have done that without even knowing.

Apart from that I don't really see a whole lot of significant change in his facial features....he just has a slightly different head position and expression on his face, which will create the illusion of some kind of change when they're morphed together.

Either way it's a bit of a red flag that there was some manipulation or misleading going on in this presentation.

I color corrected the images so you can see what they look like with the same lighting/white balance.

 

 

 

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/10/2020 6:08 pm
greyham
Active Member
Posted by: @limebike
Posted by: @greyham

So that when the muscles of the jaw relax completely during sleep, the resting position of the lower jaw is far enough forwards to keep the airway open.

I am not sure you are understanding. Either your natural mandible position is forward or something has to push the mandible forward. Since you are anchoring on the maxilla, the push effect from the mandible comes from pulling on the maxilla. Over the long run, you are going to pull your maxilla down and back.

Thanks for your question and the opportunity to clarify my understanding with you. I get that you are worried about this, but I'm not. Here's why:

The jaw muscles relax completely when asleep. We never experience this when we are awake, so it's not obvious what it feels like. If I'm asleep on my side, once the mandible is pushed forwards it doesn't require any force from the maxilla to keep it resting there. The temporomandibular joint has an extremely wide degree of freedom so the range in which the mandible can rest without any muscle tension on it is very wide, but some resting positions compromise the airway more than others. A mandibular advancement device ensures that its resting position is restricted to avoid blocking the airway. If I'm asleep lying on my back the weight of the mandible is resting on my maxilla, but on my side it's not and the lower jaw is not being pulled back because its muscles are completely relaxed.

Another reason I'm not worried about this is because force from the Facemask will be countering any downward gravity vector from the mandible if I should roll towards my back; which will be minimised anyway due to the tennis ball.

And finally, it's only an interim measure anyway. I'll remove the mandibular advancer once my airway is large enough to not need it.

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/10/2020 6:22 pm
greyham
Active Member

@mr-sand-man123

I don't much care about the change in his appearance personally. For me the take-home message is that his myriad of chronic health conditions all went away after using Homeoblock.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/10/2020 6:56 pm
toomer
Trusted Member
Posted by: @mr-sand-man123

That definitely is not the same lighting, and it's also not a timelapse....it's just a morph between two images, which can be a bit misleading because it gradually blends between the two. A timelapse would consist of hundreds of different images and you would see every change along the way instead of blending between the before and after. 

The hue of his skin is 100% lighting or color correction. I'm a photographer/videographer so I have a fair bit of knowledge about this stuff. They either color corrected the images by adding saturation to the 'after' or desaturating the 'before', or they simply had different lighting because the orange hue in the 'before' image is from a tungsten light source (which is 3200 kelvin), and the other image is most definitely not 3200 kelvin, it looks to be closer to daylight (5200k), or some kind of white fluorescent light.  This is particularly noticeable if you look at his hair and the light on the edge of his face. The 'after' image has a greenish/yellow tone in the hair, which clearly shows it's a difference in lighting/color. The color of his orange skin, and the yellow hue in his hair, particularly in the profile angle, looks to me like it had the saturation boosted. His skin tone and yellow in his hair looks unnaturally saturated.  And if it didn't, then it had different lighting and/or different white balance settings on the camera. You can change an image from having that orange tone, to a more neutral gray tone simple by changing the white balance settings on the camera. Whoever took these photos could have done that without even knowing.

Apart from that I don't really see a whole lot of significant change in his facial features....he just has a slightly different head position and expression on his face, which will create the illusion of some kind of change when they're morphed together.

Thanks - good additional perspective.  As far as the number of photos in the sequence, he notes at around 11:45 in the video that photographs were taken "every 3 months" by a colleague who is an orthodontist.  He also notes a bit later that it's a year and a half of photos - so I would assume the morph is a sequence of 5 to 6 photos.  But that's a good catch on the hair color change ... so it could be lighting, or it could simply be the camera they used was on PHD mode ("Push Here Dummy") and applied whatever JPEG processing it thought would make the picture look good - including where to set the white balance.  I wouldn't expect a dentist and an orthodontist collaborating to necessarily understand how to shoot RAW, and have the subject hold a greyscale card too.

No comments on any other of the time lapses?  The i-Cat scan where it looks like you can see the frontal sinuses getting larger (sinuses are bone, you can't make them larger without creating new bone)?  Where you can see the maxilla moving around and changing?  The time lapses of the arch transformation?  The mandibular tori visibly shrinking during the course of treatment?

These are all interesting indicators towards bone growth, IMO.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/10/2020 10:29 pm