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Apollo
Reputable Member

Let's curate some essential reading that can answer FAQs and serve as a starting point for new users. This might also encourage continuing existing conversations rather than starting redundant threads. I confess that I'm not totally sure where to begin, but I've made a list of what I think are some of the central topics on the forum. I hope you'll contribute with recommendations of topics to add (or remove/change) and links to important posts/threads discussing these issues. I guess this could also include links to outside sources of information. If people find this helpful, I will continue to update the list here in the original post as we go. 

 

Oral Posture

Swallowing

Chewing

Myofunctional Exercises

Head/Body Posture

Bodywork

Breathing

Sleep

Nutrition

Appliances

Quote
Posted : 01/01/2019 4:06 pm
Sclera and Ayla31 liked
Sclera
Estimable Member

I love this idea.

I had been thinking of this on my own, and created a few questions I had seen over time that I mulled over before realizing that I felt unequipped in almost all areas to give any satisfactory answers:

  1. What exactly is correct oral posture?
  2. What if I have a tongue tie?
  3. How do I know if I'm doing it right or wrong?
  4. How long will it take to see results?
  5. What results should I even expect?
  6. I’m [X] years old, will I get any gains?
  7. I’m not seeing any results! What's going on?
  8. How important is body posture?
  9. I’m a class ii, what do I need to do differently?
  10. I am a class iii, what do I need to do differently?
  11. I have asymmetry, and I don’t know how to deal with that as I posture my tongue.
  12. How do I record progress?
ReplyQuote
Posted : 01/01/2019 4:53 pm
Apollo and Ayla31 liked
Sclera
Estimable Member

I also want to say that I'm going to endeavor to find threads to fill your topics, @apollo. The difficulty is, sometimes responses are specific posts within topics, so it might take some time to find appropriate ones.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 01/01/2019 5:17 pm
Apollo
Reputable Member
Posted by: Sclera

I had been thinking of this on my own, and created a few questions I had seen over time that I mulled over before realizing that I felt unequipped in almost all areas to give any satisfactory answers

This is a great list of the kinds of questions that are frequently asked! I think you're right that for many of these questions the "right" answer is that we just don't know with any certainty yet, or that conventional wisdom is disappointing but we have some anecdotal reasons to hold out hope. Maybe we can direct people to the best answers even if they are currently unsatisfying.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 01/01/2019 10:12 pm
chickenita
Active Member

I’d like to add another question: 

- What is the curve of Spee? Can it be restored? 

Thank you Apollo for the effort you put in this forum 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 02/01/2019 4:33 am
Apollo
Reputable Member
Posted by: chickenita

I’d like to add another question: 

- What is the curve of Spee? Can it be restored? 

Thank you Apollo for the effort you put in this forum 

It might be helpful to develop some kind of glossary or resource defining technical terms that frequently come up. The curve of spee is the anterior to posterior curvature of the occlusal plane (see image below). Everyone has a curve of spee, some are just more curved than others. An exaggerated curve of spee is seen in malocclusions like deep overbite, and can be corrected through methods like extrusion of the molars or intrusion of the incisors. Are you saying that you believe your curve of spee is too flat?

Here's a summary article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3467870/

 

 

Image result for curve of monson

ReplyQuote
Posted : 02/01/2019 5:02 pm
chickenita
Active Member

Yes I assume that my curve of spee is too flat but I have not found any method to measure that yet. I'm going to check that article out.

I've heard of the curve of spee in the context that normal fixed braces (stright-wire) destroy the curve of spee, which could be another reason why many patients develop TMJ. However, I believe that the retraction most orthodontists still do is a lot worse than a destroyed curve of spee.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 03/01/2019 6:29 am
Apollo
Reputable Member
Posted by: chickenita

Yes I assume that my curve of spee is too flat but I have not found any method to measure that yet. I'm going to check that article out.

I've heard of the curve of spee in the context that normal fixed braces (stright-wire) destroy the curve of spee, which could be another reason why many patients develop TMJ. However, I believe that the retraction most orthodontists still do is a lot worse than a destroyed curve of spee.

Related to the curve of spee, although generally assessed from the front rather than the side, is the "smile arc." I also believe that conventional braces flattened my smile arc. Here are some posts on the topic from my thread on smile aesthetics (  https://the-great-work.org/community/main-forum/elements-of-smile-aesthetics-and-craniofacial-dystrophy/# ):

Posted by: Apollo

The Curve of Spee or the "smile arc" seems like an especially important aspect of smile aesthetics, but its relationship to craniofacial dystrophy is less apparent to me. 

 

So with an ideal smile arch, as seen in figure A above, the cusps of the teeth follow the curve of the lower lip, with the central incisors extending lower than the lateral incisors, which extend lower than the canines, etc. It seems to me that this also relates to how much gingival exposure you will have. If your central incisors are intruded relative to the ideal smile arch, the upper lip will cover the top of the tooth and gums. This is my problem. When I smile, the gingival tissue is visible above my bicuspids and molars, but my upper lip covers the gums above my incisors and canines. The cusps of my incisors and canines are all at about the same level giving me a straight or plane smile arc (close to figure B, but with less gingival exposure in the front).

Posted by: Apollo

I mentioned before that my smile arc is pretty linear (like Boyega's but not as broad), and that I have gingival exposure above my molars and bicuspids but not above my front teeth. I think part of this might be corrected by shifting my maxilla forward and raising up the posterior portion, but I also suspect that I might need to use clear aligners or some other form of orthodontics to extrude my front teeth once I have achieved the desired skeletal adjustments.

Posted by: Apollo

I've been talking about my flat smile arc. It turns out this is a frequent side effect of braces. If the brackets aren't placed right, the wire of the braces can intrude the incisors so that they line up with the canines making the front of the smile flat rather than following the curved contour of the lower lip. I looked back at the before and after pictures from my adolescent orthodontics and sure enough, my central incisors appear to be one or two millimeters higher in relation to my canines than they started. This could be part of the reason for my low lip line that leaves more than a quarter of my central incisors covered by my upper lip when I smile.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 03/01/2019 3:32 pm