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Correct occlusion

lo12288
Active Member

What is according to Dr. Mew the correct position of the teeth with respect to the other teeth. Should the posterior teeth touch?, should the front teeth touch first? if not, what teeth should get in contact first when we clench.

Thank you

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Topic starter Posted : 14/10/2020 10:17 am
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Limebike
Eminent Member
Posted by: @lo12288

What is according to Dr. Mew the correct position of the teeth with respect to the other teeth. Should the posterior teeth touch?, should the front teeth touch first? if not, what teeth should get in contact first when we clench.

Thank you

Ideally, all teeth should contact at the same time (at the same pressure).

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Posted : 14/10/2020 9:26 pm
lo12288 liked
lo12288
Active Member

@limebike Thanks Limebike

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Topic starter Posted : 15/10/2020 10:59 pm
toomer
Estimable Member
Posted by: @limebike
Posted by: @lo12288

What is according to Dr. Mew the correct position of the teeth with respect to the other teeth. Should the posterior teeth touch?, should the front teeth touch first? if not, what teeth should get in contact first when we clench.

Thank you

Ideally, all teeth should contact at the same time (at the same pressure).

Wait, even the incisors??  That doesn’t make any sense to me.  I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone with a bite like that in my entire life?

 

all the molars hitting at the same time, yes.  But incisors too?

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Posted : 19/10/2020 1:54 am
Progress
Member Moderator
Posted by: @toomer
Posted by: @limebike
Posted by: @lo12288

What is according to Dr. Mew the correct position of the teeth with respect to the other teeth. Should the posterior teeth touch?, should the front teeth touch first? if not, what teeth should get in contact first when we clench.

Thank you

Ideally, all teeth should contact at the same time (at the same pressure).

Wait, even the incisors??  That doesn’t make any sense to me.  I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone with a bite like that in my entire life?

 

all the molars hitting at the same time, yes.  But incisors too?

Overbite has become such a common occlusion in the past two hundred years that today even orthodontists see slight overbite as the standard correct occlusion. Technically any amount overbite is an occlusal failure, since the arches offer the most optimal postural and masticatory support when the forces are evenly distributed accross occlusal surface of all teeth. This allows the teeth to wear down evenly, and the jaw to rotate forward as intended as the teeth lose their height across the span of one's life. This can be seen in the teeth of hunter-gatherers, in which the arches fit together very neatly:

The hallmark of correct occlusal development is a slight upward curvature at the anterior maxillary teeth such as seen in above pics. Luciano Pavarotti is a more recent example of such development:

Admittedly I don't know what the proper way to keep the teeth together should be when malocclusion such as overbite is already present. Evolution did not really intend for humans to chew so little as to develop occlusal problems in the first place. With overbite, keeping all teeth in contact means that the anterior teeth are going to make contact with each other not via the biting surfaces, but the sides of the teeth. Would this be beneficial or counter-productive? Would it be better to first place the anterior teeth in a relaxed edge-to-edge contact, and then allow the rest of the bite to form around this position? Hard to say.

 

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Posted : 19/10/2020 9:01 am
Basim
Eminent Member
Posted by: @progress
Posted by: @toomer
Posted by: @limebike
Posted by: @lo12288

What is according to Dr. Mew the correct position of the teeth with respect to the other teeth. Should the posterior teeth touch?, should the front teeth touch first? if not, what teeth should get in contact first when we clench.

Thank you

Ideally, all teeth should contact at the same time (at the same pressure).

Wait, even the incisors??  That doesn’t make any sense to me.  I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone with a bite like that in my entire life?

 

all the molars hitting at the same time, yes.  But incisors too?

Overbite has become such a common occlusion in the past two hundred years that today even orthodontists see slight overbite as the standard correct occlusion. Technically any amount overbite is an occlusal failure, since the arches offer the most optimal postural and masticatory support when the forces are evenly distributed accross occlusal surface of all teeth. This allows the teeth to wear down evenly, and the jaw to rotate forward as intended as the teeth lose their height across the span of one's life. This can be seen in the teeth of hunter-gatherers, in which the arches fit together very neatly:

The hallmark of correct occlusal development is a slight upward curvature at the anterior maxillary teeth such as seen in above pics. Luciano Pavarotti is a more recent example of such development:

Admittedly I don't know what the proper way to keep the teeth together should be when malocclusion such as overbite is already present. Evolution did not really intend for humans to chew so little as to develop occlusal problems in the first place. With overbite, keeping all teeth in contact means that the anterior teeth are going to make contact with each other not via the biting surfaces, but the sides of the teeth. Would this be beneficial or counter-productive? Would it be better to first place the anterior teeth in a relaxed edge-to-edge contact, and then allow the rest of the bite to form around this position? Hard to say.

 

Yeah I have really noticed that having a malocclusion with mewing to keep your teeth does nothing long term since your brain sensors still can miss the missing support and you still have compensation for posture and masticated effort. Also if your maxilla or mandible even both with me having a recessed maxilla and mandible. Personally I believe fixing body posture still isn’t enough to fix this issue as the whole body is connected and being back to square one with no dramatic improvement to the structure of your face like hemstrubl or Jamo. And I have been chewing with mastic gum for 2 weeks and even it’s not a long time to see a significant change but having a malocclusion to chew hard foods or hard gum also does nothing since being recessed limits the strengthening of your mastication muscles like pytergoids or temporalis muscle which are important for facial form and growth. But having a deep bite in the back of the molars and open anterior bite makes you have imbalances with asymmetry of the face and bad forward head posture regardless if you have amazing body posture. Morale of the story if you have a malocclusion, get Invisalign. At least it’s not fixed braces and prevent your teeth from getting pushed more into the face plus with a little palatial expansion if you 3D print correctly. Afterwards with perfect or near perfect occlusion, Mewing and body posture is much easier and now can just fix the cranial facial complex.

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Posted : 19/10/2020 2:31 pm
Meowxilla liked
Limebike
Eminent Member

@toomer Even if you have a "normal" overjet, the outside edges of your lower incisors will touch the lingual surface of your upper incisors.

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Posted : 19/10/2020 3:37 pm