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Can hardmewing reduce nasal cavity size?

Dahunta
New Member

tl;dr: Can hardmewing, by applying pressure on the hard palate, instead of shifting the maxilla up and forward, actually just bend the hard palate into the nasal cavity and thus reduce its size?

Hi all,

I've been mewing for a year and hardmewing for a few weeks, and I've seen some good results (can fit my whole tongue on the roof of my mouth now, better occlusion).

Initially I experienced improved nasal breathing when achieving proper tongue posture (breathing felt easier, nose more opened), but that's not the case anymore. Hardmewing has been producing this sensation in my nose (some pressure and soreness, like I got punched). At the same time my nose has felt less opened, especially in the inferior turbinate area and in the back of my nose. Like it's got narrower inside. It's like the air is going more upward (towards superior turbinate) and there is less air going around the inferior turbinates. Has anyone experienced this? By the way I don't think I've been having bad tongue posture, I'm consistent with putting the back third of my tongue up. The only thing that comes to mind is that when I'm hardmewing I don't push my teeth together as this can lead to pain in my case.

I was wondering if perhaps hardmewing could, instead of shifting the maxilla up and forward, actually just bend the hard palate into the nasal cavity and thus reduce its size? Basically high-arching the palate.

 

Quote
Topic starter Posted : 23/12/2019 7:53 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member
Posted by: @dahunta

tl;dr: Can hardmewing, by applying pressure on the hard palate, instead of shifting the maxilla up and forward, actually just bend the hard palate into the nasal cavity and thus reduce its size?

Hi all,

I've been mewing for a year and hardmewing for a few weeks, and I've seen some good results (can fit my whole tongue on the roof of my mouth now, better occlusion).

Initially I experienced improved nasal breathing when achieving proper tongue posture (breathing felt easier, nose more opened), but that's not the case anymore. Hardmewing has been producing this sensation in my nose (some pressure and soreness, like I got punched). At the same time my nose has felt less opened, especially in the inferior turbinate area and in the back of my nose. Like it's got narrower inside. It's like the air is going more upward (towards superior turbinate) and there is less air going around the inferior turbinates. Has anyone experienced this? By the way I don't think I've been having bad tongue posture, I'm consistent with putting the back third of my tongue up. The only thing that comes to mind is that when I'm hardmewing I don't push my teeth together as this can lead to pain in my case.

I was wondering if perhaps hardmewing could, instead of shifting the maxilla up and forward, actually just bend the hard palate into the nasal cavity and thus reduce its size? Basically high-arching the palate.

 

Don't push up

ReplyQuote
Posted : 25/12/2019 11:34 pm
LACHRIS
Active Member

@eddiemoney

Why not? If I'm recessed wouldn't I want upswing?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/01/2020 4:28 pm
sinned
Estimable Member

@lachris

Because pushing up doesn't do anything, the maxilla doesn't drop down and back, it's just a lack of expansion/forward growth. Your maxilla grows up and back is displaced forward and DOWNWARD. A properly grown maxilla is one that displaces downwards, downwards "growth" is not incorrect growth.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/01/2020 10:01 pm
AR10 liked
Elwynn
Estimable Member

@sinned

Not OP, but in light of what you said, what techniques at improving oral posture would you recommend - the "ballooning" method that has been mentioned here often lately?

24 years old

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/01/2020 12:25 am
sinned
Estimable Member

@elwynn

Basically, just try to get your tongue flat against the palate (like with #1 in the image below) and expand it laterally and forward, should be relatively light-medium pressure/force, not hard. Then just hold it 24/7, your teeth should not hurt nor should it be painful, it's possible that if you apply too much force that your molars start hurting, that's not really practical or sustainable anyway, keep it light-medium.

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/01/2020 1:01 am
kdd999 and Elwynn liked
Elwynn
Estimable Member

@sinned

That's more or less what I've been doing for the past few months, but I wanted to double-check. Thanks.

24 years old

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/01/2020 1:27 am