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Biomehanical dystonia - splints pros/cons  

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Fika
 Fika
Active Member

 So my point of interest is posture related to teeh/jaw.
And lately I have been following this site/community: https://biomechanical-dystonia.net/

The skeletal models and descriptions they have there are spot on describing my postural collapse, phase4.
They are mostly propagating the use of splints as a form of therapy to align your spine and jaw... I am exploring so much information about all this that I have to admit, my head is spinning a bit.
I really don't know what step to take next, I have been in contact with a lot of doctors lately also, and none of them use splint therapy... yet there are a lot of people on the website that claim this has helped them immensely. While I understand from a biomehanical point of view how splints could align spine and jaw segments, what I fail to understand is when does it end... in the end you are still left with your own teeth that you bite and chew with.
Maybe they can help for some... but it seems to me that they could also do harm in the long run. If I remember correctly, Mike dismissed splint therapy in 1 of his videos... that I just cant find now.

Any of you have thoughts about this?

Quote
Posted : 09/05/2018 6:01 pm
TGW
 TGW
TGW Admin Admin

I agree with philosophy that splint therapy attempts the restoring of a lever effect of the teeth to raise the skull up off the spine and allow it to decompress. I also agree with its use in helping correct asymmetry caused by the roll of the maxilla (but not the pitch or the yaw). I do not recommend splint therapy unless you are experiencing debilitating and deteriorating spinal problems.  

It's an effective band-aid on improper craniofacial development - it doesn't actually restore proper development, but it simulates correct development so that the head and spine posture move back to almost where they should be with proper development.

The issue being that this only survives as long as the splint is in - once you correct with the splint, you need it for life. At best, the posture/spine will begin to collapse as soon as the splint is absent.

Note: The splint WILL change the position of the teeth and bite - once this occurs, you're always going to need the splint (or braces to move the bite back to where the teeth touch properly again). As you notice in the seller websites, there is no end of therapy for the splint.

At worst, the splint shift the teeth and mandible in such a way that they are now in an even worse growth pattern. That is to say, the mandible and upper jaw get further distorted, but in such a way that that the spine is allowed to straighten out. 

In summation: For correcting asymmetry from roll of the maxilla (and subsequent issues in the spine) a splint can be a good therapy. But for all issues related to pitch, yaw, and growth of the jaw/maxilla/skull the splint is merely a device for compensation - not a cure. At best it will relieve symptoms in the spine, but it also has the potential to further cause deterioration in the development of the maxilla and jaw. 

Good examples are those people who have used the splints, like Starecta rectifier, showing that their back has straightened out: The spine is fixed, but the skulls/faces are still improperly developed, and sometimes worse than when they started. And now that the spine has been trained into proper position while the skull is improperly developed, they may have shut the door on being able to correct their skull without being forced to let their spine collapse again. 

Using the splint could be sacrificing a chance at correcting the craniofacial development for the tradeoff of allowing the spine to decompress.  

ReplyQuote
Posted : 09/05/2018 8:38 pm
Fika
 Fika
Active Member

Thank you so much for this, I understand now, and my thought about it were similar.

Every one of us is a completely specific case, so much as the body is complicated there are as many cases I would say. Maybe some of us need a bit of different therapys and not 1 therapy all the way.

So I have dystonic symptoms that are really not a joke anymore, but luckily for me I remember the root of the problem. When I was 17 a dentist made my right lower molar tilt inward (I dont wana explain how, better not ask), and I dont have proper contact since then on that side when biting. I remember for the first time in my life getting a stiff neck on the right, and now I have symptoms of asymmetrical postural collapsing to the right.
My plan is to visit Dr. Tony O'Connor in Ireland, I found him both on the ALF and Orthotropics map, let him adjust my bite with the ALF appliance, especially upright that molar on the right side to make contact. And then with proper biting and teeth contact, apply non stop myofacial and tongue exercises to fix my skull, simultaneously straightening my spine trough exercises that I already became found of.
Any thoughts about this plan?

In addition I did wore braces with an unilateral extraction that could be addressed both trough the ALF and trough tongue posture later on.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/05/2018 8:59 am
sparkyyy
Active Member

Did you meet up with Dr. Tony O'Connor, how is he?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 18/09/2018 12:27 pm
Silver
Trusted Member
Posted by: TGW

I agree with philosophy that splint therapy attempts the restoring of a lever effect of the teeth to raise the skull up off the spine and allow it to decompress. I also agree with its use in helping correct asymmetry caused by the roll of the maxilla (but not the pitch or the yaw). I do not recommend splint therapy unless you are experiencing debilitating and deteriorating spinal problems.  

It's an effective band-aid on improper craniofacial development - it doesn't actually restore proper development, but it simulates correct development so that the head and spine posture move back to almost where they should be with proper development.

The issue being that this only survives as long as the splint is in - once you correct with the splint, you need it for life. At best, the posture/spine will begin to collapse as soon as the splint is absent.

Note: The splint WILL change the position of the teeth and bite - once this occurs, you're always going to need the splint (or braces to move the bite back to where the teeth touch properly again). As you notice in the seller websites, there is no end of therapy for the splint.

At worst, the splint shift the teeth and mandible in such a way that they are now in an even worse growth pattern. That is to say, the mandible and upper jaw get further distorted, but in such a way that that the spine is allowed to straighten out. 

In summation: For correcting asymmetry from roll of the maxilla (and subsequent issues in the spine) a splint can be a good therapy. But for all issues related to pitch, yaw, and growth of the jaw/maxilla/skull the splint is merely a device for compensation - not a cure. At best it will relieve symptoms in the spine, but it also has the potential to further cause deterioration in the development of the maxilla and jaw. 

Good examples are those people who have used the splints, like Starecta rectifier, showing that their back has straightened out: The spine is fixed, but the skulls/faces are still improperly developed, and sometimes worse than when they started. And now that the spine has been trained into proper position while the skull is improperly developed, they may have shut the door on being able to correct their skull without being forced to let their spine collapse again. 

Using the splint could be sacrificing a chance at correcting the craniofacial development for the tradeoff of allowing the spine to decompress.  

Does the maxilla bone itself remodel, or is the change merely a repositioning of the skull bones' relation to each other?

Mike Mew said in one of his videos he believes that the individual bones of a CFD skull and of an ideal skull would be indistinguishable because the primary problem is the bones' position relative to each other, with the possible exception of the mandible and the maxilla.

Would not someone "successfully" treated with Starecta (or something similar) still be able to begin mewing and correct their skull? Do they have to keep the correct–oral–posture–blocking–appliance in 24/7 to prevent re-collapse?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 18/09/2018 9:02 pm
LucaM
Active Member

Silver i want to know that too.

In a about to begin a teeth balancing and want to know if its possible to continue mewing

ReplyQuote
Posted : 20/09/2018 11:56 am