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Attractive faces are built by chewing forces - VERY VALUABLE INFORMATION FROM SURGICAL JOURNAL.

egyptian0
(@egyptian0)
New Member

Found a very important piece of information - could not find any posts about it here so I guess this is the first.

 

This picture shows the way the forces of mastication (chewing) are distributed across the skull. Notice anything?

These forces show the exact same pattern that attractive faces have:

-Wider and more forward maxilla.

-Wider and more forward cheekbones.

-Chin and mandible become wider, longer and more forward grown.

-Wider orbits.

Buttresses of mastication

This is just one of many pictures found in surgical journals. Just search up 'mastication buttresses' and you'll find plenty.

Why does this matter?

It's well known in this community and in the medical world that bones remodel based on the mechanical loads they encounter:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190531100544.htm (mice fed a hard diet had stronger jawbones)

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00016357.2018.1531437 (mice fed a hard diet had wider zygomatic bones)

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-24293-3 (human mandible shape associated with masseter muscle force)

"This won't work in adulthood!!!"

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2020.606947/full

"The bones in the masticatory apparatus also have a high rate of remodeling, not only during development and postnatal growth but well into adulthood."

A good example of this is braces - while I'm not a fan of them, they have pretty much proven that adults can easily and rapidly remodel their bones. In fact, most people can see pretty good progress from braces in only 1-2 months.

 

Therefore, chewing appears to be the primary driver of developing a healthy, attractive face, even more so than mewing (although it is still important)

What is the best way to chew?

It is very important to chew with a good neck position AND DO NOT CHEW WITH FORWARD HEAD POSTURE: IT CAN CAUSE TMD:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18808377/

While I could not find any articles or even anecdotes about chewing while chin tucking, I have been doing it for around a week now and there is a lot less strain on my joints.

 

So what are your guys thoughts on this? it seems very promising. Will update this post regularly with any new information/updates.

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Topic starter Posted : 05/02/2022 1:59 pm
Topic Tags
CrimsonChin
(@crimsonchin)
50+ Forum Posts

I chew gum for hours a day and I think it helps, though not as substantially as some people claim. Also, I have asked this question countless times and am met with radio silence every time - if posture and all this stuff is the main factor, then why are some newborn babies clearly born with the ideal face? Quite often their parents have an ideal face too, but once in a while the parents will have bad faces and the baby doesn't. I've never heard anyone bring up anything about this.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 06/02/2022 2:33 am
harrykanemaxilla
(@harrykanemaxilla)
200+ Forum Posts

I believe its because its natural for the skull to be formed perfectly during the womb. Then when poor habits happen during childhood, the maxilla continues to grow however it grows imperfectly and soon that childs well developed face turns to recessed by the time they are a teenager.

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Posted : 07/02/2022 3:57 am
harrykanemaxilla
(@harrykanemaxilla)
200+ Forum Posts

This is exactly why. I do wonder how much heavy chewing can have an affect for adults with recessed maxillas and mandibles. We need a way to grow to our optimal position despite it being so late

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/02/2022 4:02 am
harrykanemaxilla
(@harrykanemaxilla)
200+ Forum Posts

I have been mewing however the chewing side of it I have rarely targeted. I eat soft foods still but mew with teeth in contact. Not much change to my face as I am an adult but my lower jaw is narrower than my cheekbones from my front profile and it is clockwise rotated. When I clench my massaters they hardly bulk out or look square 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 07/02/2022 4:20 am
CrimsonChin
(@crimsonchin)
50+ Forum Posts

That's a pretty comprehensive post and has some good info in it, but I'm mostly referring to babies as soon as they are born, as it's not like they all look perfect for a few weeks until their environment starts affecting them. One of the examples I have always thought of is Jessa Duggar (evil family aside) - some of her siblings have decent faces and some of them have bad faces, but her's is the only one clearly above the rest, despite her parents not being good looking. Also, her kids were all born with the ideal structure and as far as I can remember, none of her siblings' kids have it either. Having such a large family to analyze makes her the most interesting example I can think of because there doesn't seem to be a reason as to why that would happen genetically or environmentally.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 08/02/2022 12:59 am
CrimsonChin
(@crimsonchin)
50+ Forum Posts

Yeah, I guess I phrased the post a little incoherently. Mentioning Jessa was an example of genes or something else possibly being responsible, despite her being an anomaly in her family and mentioning her kids was an example of babies being born with the ideal face. I used to watch 19 Kids and Counting all the time and any old photos they showed of her made it look as though she always had a better structure. It's hard to imagine not being bottlefed was the reason for that, because she was like the 4th born or something like that, so for the parents to change how they raised the kids and only for her doesn't make much sense.

If it's worth anything, my twin needed braces and I didn't, though I had chronic temple headaches from around 10-15, so either that's due to genetic differences or maybe I clenched really hard and didn't know it which possibly helped my development, though that's just a wild guess.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 11/02/2022 2:20 am
toomer
(@toomer)
200+ Forum Posts
Posted by: @egyptian0

"This won't work in adulthood!!!"

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2020.606947/full

"The bones in the masticatory apparatus also have a high rate of remodeling, not only during development and postnatal growth but well into adulthood."

A good example of this is braces - while I'm not a fan of them, they have pretty much proven that adults can easily and rapidly remodel their bones. In fact, most people can see pretty good progress from braces in only 1-2 months.

Interesting post/find ... some of the ideas in there about how muscles and bones affect each other are some of the key ideas behind neuromuscular dentistry.  My provider basically agrees with the "muscles win over bone over time" philosophy (kind of how water slowly shapes rock over a long period of time, i.e.: the Grand Canyon).  And so my first couple of appliances with him were more about retraining my mastication muscles into a more correct pattern, and then over time the body should slowly adapt the jaws around that (we're talking 3-4 year long process from start to finish).

Although while I agree with the general ideas you've stated, a couple points on your comment.  First, there's the difference between alveolar bone - which is what your teeth sit in - and cortical/skeletal bone.  Aleveolar bone is - for lack of a better term - a bit more "spongey" so it's easier to manipulate.  However, orthodontics is generally the manipulation/movement of teeth within the existing alveolar bone.  What expansion providers and techniques aim to do is to create more bone overall ... and that's the part that is quite debatable within adults, and brings up the topic of sutures and how they behave in adulthood.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 11/02/2022 7:34 pm
Mewem143
(@mewem143)
10+ Forum Posts

@toomer Which is where MSE comes in I assume. Seems other appliances like DNA/ ALF/ Homeo all deal with the alveolar (which I think even invisalign could do), while MSE actually changes the existing bone that the teeth rest on.

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Posted : 12/02/2022 9:41 pm
Mewem143
(@mewem143)
10+ Forum Posts

Interestingly enough I think it also comes from oral posture during sleep. We sleep from a range of 5-9 hours a day and if you add that up over a lifetime, that is a long time. Mouth open = no support for the maxilla to upswing and grow forwards, mouth closed while sleeping = correctly directing the growth. But I still do see the argument for muscles as I was a mouth breather, but had bruxism, so my jaw still has decent development.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/02/2022 9:47 pm
Tree Curve
(@tree-curve)
New Member

The only chewing techniques a human needs to align erupting teeth are:

1. SQUIRREL CHEWING: a child can mimic the way a squirrel uses both hands to bite into a ROUND ACORN by using both hands to hold a ROUND APPLE and bite into it to encapsulate incisors, helping to guide them into perfect alignment with each other. This prevents over/underbite, overjet, and synchronises growth of the maxilla with the mandible because the compression, tension, and rotational force links of using a ROUND apple focus on the anterior part of the maxilla and mandible's bone while transferring those 3 forces posteriorly though the entire bone. SEE "CLAUS MATTHECK YOU TUBE: MATHEMATICS OF TREES" and apply it to the above Nature article. 

Dont bite into a flat apple because it is impossible to apply those 3 forces through flat, cut apple. Nature and biomechanics work with round and curved forms only!

2. Carrot Rolling: Dogs roll their erupting premolars around a round twig. Children can roll a round carrot gently between erupting premolars, as needed to intercuspate them. Avoid chewing hard foods while doing this because hard foods can reinforce the wrong force vector. After the teeth intercuspate, firm foods can resume. Likewise avoid chewing gum until the intercuspation is achieved from the carrot rolling. This is about precision-not about hard forces or constant loading of bone. 

3. Bear pulling: children in need of more anterior growth can hold a dried meat or salmon with both hands and bite into it while using postural muscles to hold the head back with perfect posture. - like a bear does-it is no coincidence that bears, who catch and pull at salmon, evolved a forward growing face. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 23/03/2022 8:08 am

THE GREAT WORK

Warning:
Your Cranial Sutures Need To Be open for CranioSacral / Jaw Development!