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Something on my Soft Palate Cracked  

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Elwynn
Estimable Member

On the sides of my soft palate, about 1 cm behind my last molars there are two bony protrusions. They extend from the flesh of my palate just slightly and have the shape similar to a rib bone. Here's a childish illustration:

When I try to engage the posterior of my tongue, it touches against these bony fragments. So long as the contact is of low to medium strength, I do not feel any pain or discomfort. However, when I swallow hard so that the posterior of my tongue pushes strongly against these palatal protrusions, I start to feel an unpleasant "stabbing" sensation against my soft-palate, in the spots where these protrusions are located. Although it's more of a discomfort than intense pain, it get annoying.

More importantly, some time ago as I was swallowing hard, the bony fragment on the left side of my palate "cracked." The noise was unmistakable and sounded just like snapping a thin chicken bone. Again, there was no pain, just discomfort. However, my left eye started to water immediately afterwards in response.

Since then, the left protrusion has had a different shape than the right one: it's smaller in length and doesn't have the sharp end that the right protrusion still has. I suppose that it was this tip that snapped off when I heard the crack. Furthermore, when I swallow hard, I feel the discomfort more intensely in the left protrusion.

I don't know what to make of all this. Based on some basic research, it seems that the bony structure in question is called a pterygoid hamulus. However, my anatomy knowledge is pretty poor, so I would appreciate it if anybody could confirm it for me. I'm also curious if anyone else here has felt these protrusions while mewing.

It's strange to me that I have possibly managed to crack / fracture a pterygoid humulus simply by engaging the posterior of my tongue. I don't know much about anatomy but it seems to me that a healthy human skull should not endure damage as a result of its owner just trying to act in the way that nature intended.

Honestly, any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated.

24 years old

Quote
Posted : 12/11/2019 12:35 am
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Kyte
 Kyte
Estimable Member

Hi @elwynn

After ~4 months of mewing I noticed those weak bony protrusion too. I am quite sure I didn't have them before.

They keept "growing" along the time becoming more prominent, so I thought my upper wisdom were erupting. I took xrays but I realized I literally don't have them.

I concluded they are the hamulus separating from the maxilla because It somehow moved, maybe up and forward, who knows.

However I dont feel them while mewing and don't hurt in any way.

I red your before/After post. Did you notice any difference in your cheakbones?

ReplyQuote
Posted : 12/11/2019 1:49 am
LACHRIS
Active Member

@kyte

I wonder what would happen if you were to thumb Themis and outwards.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2020 2:35 pm
Elwynn
Estimable Member
Posted by: @kyte

Hi @elwynn

After ~4 months of mewing I noticed those weak bony protrusion too. I am quite sure I didn't have them before.

They keept "growing" along the time becoming more prominent, so I thought my upper wisdom were erupting. I took xrays but I realized I literally don't have them.

I concluded they are the hamulus separating from the maxilla because It somehow moved, maybe up and forward, who knows.

However I dont feel them while mewing and don't hurt in any way.

I red your before/After post. Did you notice any difference in your cheakbones?

Hey, sorry for the late response. To answer your question, yes I did notice that my cheekbone area has changed. In short, they appear more prominent. However, I'm not sure if that's due to soft-tissue improvements as a result of using my cheek muscles less and tongue and jaw muscles more correctly, an actual change in bone structure or alignment, or both. I've noticed this improvement before that thing cracked in my soft palate. The improvements probably continued after the crack without interruption, but I can't definitely confirm this because it's only been about a month.

24 years old

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2020 4:20 pm
Elwynn
Estimable Member

@lachris

I'm assuming you meant, "I wonder what would happen if you were to thumb them in and outwards."

They would probably crack with enough force. Since I was able to crack these thin, bony protrusions using my tongue, it shouldn't be difficult at all to do it using one's thumbs - if one were so inclined.

I haven't done anything about the left protrusion that cracked. It hurt a little afterwards for a day, but now, I feel no discomfort there at all. When I tongue that region, I feel there a lump that is about 60% of the size of the lump on the right side (because it was only the tip of that protrusion that cracked, not the whole thing). I didn't experience any problems as a result of this - as far as I'm aware - but I made this post to find out whether it's something that I should be concerned about.

24 years old

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2020 4:26 pm
max iller
Eminent Member

I believe those are the famed 'wings of the sphenoid' that is part of the skull that houses the pituitary gland, there is belief that those of us with awful growth have actually constricted its functionality via setback maxilla that affects the inner portions of the skull. It's possible what you experienced was a powerful adjustment your posture made on your skull, where perhaps there was tension back there that was released in one big pop instead of incrementally over time. Hopefully it was an asymmetry being fixed and not created, either or if you experience another pop on the other side you'll know.

@Kyte 
Maybe your maxilla did come up and forwards exposing the wings, and they'll now start adjusting along with your skull as your new posture is applying pressure on them? 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 14/01/2020 8:15 pm
RamonT liked
RamonT
Trusted Member
Posted by: @elwynn

On the sides of my soft palate, about 1 cm behind my last molars there are two bony protrusions. They extend from the flesh of my palate just slightly and have the shape similar to a rib bone. Here's a childish illustration:

When I try to engage the posterior of my tongue, it touches against these bony fragments. So long as the contact is of low to medium strength, I do not feel any pain or discomfort. However, when I swallow hard so that the posterior of my tongue pushes strongly against these palatal protrusions, I start to feel an unpleasant "stabbing" sensation against my soft-palate, in the spots where these protrusions are located. Although it's more of a discomfort than intense pain, it get annoying.

More importantly, some time ago as I was swallowing hard, the bony fragment on the left side of my palate "cracked." The noise was unmistakable and sounded just like snapping a thin chicken bone. Again, there was no pain, just discomfort. However, my left eye started to water immediately afterwards in response.

Since then, the left protrusion has had a different shape than the right one: it's smaller in length and doesn't have the sharp end that the right protrusion still has. I suppose that it was this tip that snapped off when I heard the crack. Furthermore, when I swallow hard, I feel the discomfort more intensely in the left protrusion.

I don't know what to make of all this. Based on some basic research, it seems that the bony structure in question is called a pterygoid hamulus. However, my anatomy knowledge is pretty poor, so I would appreciate it if anybody could confirm it for me. I'm also curious if anyone else here has felt these protrusions while mewing.

It's strange to me that I have possibly managed to crack / fracture a pterygoid humulus simply by engaging the posterior of my tongue. I don't know much about anatomy but it seems to me that a healthy human skull should not endure damage as a result of its owner just trying to act in the way that nature intended.

Honestly, any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated.

You are on the right track!. I get so many cracks, pops, pulsating and vibrating movement all the time. When I started getting them I was afraid I was gonna drop dead like the guys at the Matrix because of how hard I was mewing, I thought my whole skull was going to crack=_=, but I'm still going at it and I go hard. You'll be just fine.

Here is a tip to add more tension to that area:

As you engage the posterior third/back of my tongue, press the palm of your hand on the chin right below the lower lip, press hard and maintain the tension for a while, you can also do chewing action while keeping the same position and you can also bring the palm of the other hand and press both at the same time... give it a try.

Now to even both sides of the face, imagine that your whole maxilla, zygomatic bones area, is a mask and you are adjusting it with facial expressions and the tension and pressure that your whole face is creating. Send more of that tension-pressure with the facial expression to the areas that you think your face needs it more to get even.

 

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Posted : 14/01/2020 11:08 pm
Elwynn
Estimable Member

@maxiller

@ramotT

Yes, hopefully the crack I heard was just a strong adjustment, and not damage. On the one hand, I feel with my tongue that the tip of the left "wing" is gone; on the other hand, my newly-acquired ability to stick more of my posterior tongue onto my palate coincided with this crack I heard. Maybe time will tell. I'll update here if any new developments occur.

On a separate note, it's quite astounding how much effect the tongue can have after all. My experience shoots a hole in the belief held by some skeptics on here who claim that the tongue exerts far too little force to have any impact. If that were the case, then my soft palate would not have popped the way it did.

24 years old

ReplyQuote
Posted : 15/01/2020 1:23 pm
RamonT
Trusted Member
Posted by: @elwynn

@maxiller

@ramotT

Yes, hopefully the crack I heard was just a strong adjustment, and not damage. On the one hand, I feel with my tongue that the tip of the left "wing" is gone; on the other hand, my newly-acquired ability to stick more of my posterior tongue onto my palate coincided with this crack I heard. Maybe time will tell. I'll update here if any new developments occur.

On a separate note, it's quite astounding how much effect the tongue can have after all. My experience shoots a hole in the belief held by some skeptics on here who claim that the tongue exerts far too little force to have any impact. If that were the case, then my soft palate would not have popped the way it did.

Again, don't worry bro, you are on the right track, and keep pressing that tongue back there. It's very important to keep an excellent posture, very important. Your tongue will get stronger and in time you will feel some force-adjustment from the brain-stem all the way down the sacrum bones and hips and if you keep great posture the alignment happens a bit smoother. Also you will feel as if your skull wants to take off and forcing you up with it; another great feeling you will have is similar to NZT 48 from the movie limitless when he takes the pill and then 50secs later he feels, hears and sees everything clearer..... Mewing is really extraordinary.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xP-ZwmCPBAs

From 10 sec mark to 2:05 mark

Have fun mewing.

 

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 15/01/2020 2:09 pm
Elwynn
Estimable Member

@ramont

Haha, you know, strangely enough I think that mewing has actually had an effect on my cognition. I don't suffer from brain-fog as often, and I tend to wake up less groggy. I think it's mostly the fact that my breathing has improved, but it could also be that better posture facilitates better connection between the brain, brain-stem, and other parts of the body.

24 years old

ReplyQuote
Posted : 15/01/2020 3:19 pm
RamonT
Trusted Member
Posted by: @elwynn

@ramont

Haha, you know, strangely enough I think that mewing has actually had an effect on my cognition. I don't suffer from brain-fog as often, and I tend to wake up less groggy. I think it's mostly the fact that my breathing has improved, but it could also be that better posture facilitates better connection between the brain, brain-stem, and other parts of the body.

Elwynn,

That's what I meant to say, from the brain stem down to the sacrum bones and hips,=_=. I'm very glad to hear that, keep it up, Bro.

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Posted : 15/01/2020 5:17 pm
Elwynn liked
Elwynn
Estimable Member

EDIT: Corrected errors.

I'm posting an update because since I improved my tongue posture further a couple days ago, I have been experiencing some very mild discomfort in the area of my soft palate where I experienced the crack. As Progress pointed out in his post below, the "protrusions" in question are the pterygoid hamuli.

If you roll back your tongue against the soft palate, you should be able to locate these hamuli just by feeling around. They are positioned somewhere between the uvula and where the hard palate begins, off the center, on each side.

In retrospect, I doubt that the crack I felt was just an adjustment, because I hear clicks and cracks all day now, and what I experienced was much more distinct. It really did feel like something fracturing, and when I tongue my left hamulus (the one that cracked), I now feel that it's shorter than the right one. The left side also has a "dimple" where the point of the hamulus would have been. Furthermore, I have felt no similar crack on the right side (which would have possibly happened, if it were a true adjustment).

It's been months, and I haven't observed any negative consequences, but I do think it's something that I should speak to a professional about, just for the peace of mind. I'm a little unsure of what sort of doctor would be knowledgeable about such a matter, though. Does anybody have any suggestion? Any other advice would also be appreciated.

Thanks.

24 years old

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Posted : 20/02/2020 2:19 am
Progress
Member Moderator

It sounds like you are talking about the pterygoid hamulii like you suspected earlier. The posterior clinoid process resides quite high. If you could palpate it with your tongue, you would probably be able to touch your pituitary gland too, since it sits in sella turcica. The picture you chose is a bit tricky to interpret because in it the sphenoid is depicted from a superior angle rather than posterior one.

Related image

 

Image result for pterygoid hamulus

 

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Posted : 20/02/2020 8:44 am
Elwynn
Estimable Member

@progress

Thanks for the correction. It was the pterygoid hamulus where I felt the crack, after all, and not the clinoid process. I have edited my previous post to avoid confusion.

24 years old

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Posted : 20/02/2020 1:08 pm