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Help me, is this the reason behind my facial asymmetry?? Anybody help

Drave
Active Member

Earlier i posted a topic saying my face is uneven like one side of my face is lower than other and it is visible in eyes and jaw and it seems more noticable after i started mewing

But recently i noticed that its not just my one side of the face but also one side of my teeth, my upper teeth row seems slanted to left side ,is this the real problem behind my facial asymmetry? Anybody know?

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Topic starter Posted : 24/11/2018 10:59 am
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DriveTheMaxillaForwards
Active Member

Does your tongue lie straight in your mouth? I mewed for 6 months, not realizing my tongue was majorly towards the right. The effect of this was that only the right side of my face «grew»

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Posted : 24/11/2018 11:27 am
Drave
Active Member

How can i know that? It feels like it is straight, not sure

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Topic starter Posted : 24/11/2018 12:01 pm
DriveTheMaxillaForwards
Active Member

Try reading the mewing tutorial on this site 

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Posted : 24/11/2018 1:22 pm
Fred
 Fred
Estimable Member

Can I see @darkindigo

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Posted : 24/11/2018 8:18 pm
Samuel Alonzo
Eminent Member

Can you send me it

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Posted : 24/11/2018 8:41 pm
Slinky
Trusted Member
Posted by: darkindigo

Yep!!!  Mewing can cause and even worsen asymmetries.  See my post at  https://the-great-work.org/community/case-discussions/tmj-pain-and-headaches-from-hard-mewing/#post-10684 on how I have tried to stop.  Honestly, being off this site has been good for me to get my more natural ignorance of tongue positioning back.  Hope this helps!  Also... FYI... the positioning of far back molars affects eye size and even placement.  I cannot offer medical advice but I found that using my tongue to press on the nubs (where my wisdom teeth should be) right behind my upper back molars only lightly and for less than a minute had a big impact on my eyes over the following days.  I had an article on it - which I had taken down when I left this site.  If you want it, I saved all my work.... can message you directly with details of my experience.  

Came back for some truth bombing.  LOL

Darkindigo should be banned asap

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Posted : 24/11/2018 9:40 pm
lil nut
Eminent Member
Posted by: Drave

Earlier i posted a topic saying my face is uneven like one side of my face is lower than other and it is visible in eyes and jaw and it seems more noticable after i started mewing

But recently i noticed that its not just my one side of the face but also one side of my teeth, my upper teeth row seems slanted to left side ,is this the real problem behind my facial asymmetry? Anybody know?

I have the same problem one side of my face is more melted than the other. I think this is TMJ imbalance one side of my jaw clicks but the other side cant. When i jut out my teeth one side is slightly more raised than the other. Also my chin is crooked when i jut it out. This problem has mentally f*cked me and it isnt getting better.

 

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Posted : 25/11/2018 1:22 pm
Drave
Active Member

Exact same problem i am facing, crooked chin is very visible as my jaw looks misaligned and slanted, but i dont have a tmj i guess, anyway i am just trusting mewing and hope it will change in future

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Topic starter Posted : 25/11/2018 1:30 pm
Drave
Active Member

You mean pressing with tip of the tongue? Between i dont have wisdom teeth yet

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Topic starter Posted : 25/11/2018 1:32 pm
Drave
Active Member

Will this help if my left eye is  lower than right? My whole left side is droopy,

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Topic starter Posted : 26/11/2018 5:02 am
lordbaron
New Member

I have the same issue :<

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Posted : 26/11/2018 8:03 pm
openbytes17
Active Member

Hey OP, i have the same issue. I already had an asymmetric maxilla due to mouthbreathing however i stupidly got braces resulting in a more asymmetric face, eyes, cheekbones as the braces made my recessed side of teeth even more reccessed. The teeth on this side also appear higher. I am now in the process of mewing to fix this.

I know something is happening as every morning i wake up the cheekbones on my recessed side are puffy and red. 

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Posted : 27/11/2018 5:59 pm
Progress
Member Moderator

It's useful to note that since the root of the tongue is attached to the interior of the mandible, how you position your jaw while mewing will affect the direction of the tongue's push. You could view the tongue as the engine and mandible as the steering wheel. Merely focusing on keeping teeth together can lead to overlooking asymmetric engagement of the masseter and temporalis muscles, because it's very possible to bring the teeth together by using the muscles on one side only.

You can start working towards eliminating this issue by biting sideways against the upper jaw while trying to maintain balanced tongue posture. Do this while standing or walking. Try both sides. You will likely notice that by pushing the mandible towards one side in particular, the whole body begins to unwind from the postural asymmetries caused by the former uneven jaw positioning. Biting towards this side may make the tongue posture feel more difficult and cause it to require more conscious attention. 

 

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Posted : 27/11/2018 6:42 pm
sebastian
Eminent Member
Posted by: Progress

It's useful to note that since the root of the tongue is attached to the interior of the mandible, how you position your jaw while mewing will affect the direction of the tongue's push. You could view the tongue as the engine and mandible as the steering wheel. Merely focusing on keeping teeth together can lead to overlooking asymmetric engagement of the masseter and temporalis muscles, because it's very possible to bring the teeth together by using the muscles on one side only.

You can start working towards eliminating this issue by biting sideways against the upper jaw while trying to maintain balanced tongue posture. Do this while standing or walking. Try both sides. You will likely notice that by pushing the mandible towards one side in particular, the whole body begins to unwind from the postural asymmetries caused by the former uneven jaw positioning. Biting towards this side may make the tongue posture feel more difficult and cause it to require more conscious attention. 

 

For how long would you bite on the specific side to correct the asymmetries? It looks like i have been mewing more to the right side this whole time, but its my left side my teeth are more shifted to, and where my face is bigger. How does that make sense? I can't mew directly on the incisive papilla, since it isn't centered in my face, and it'll just worsen my asymmetry if i put pressure on it.

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Posted : 28/11/2018 5:52 am
Drave
Active Member

Did u meant moving lower row of teeth to side little bit and keep that position as bite?

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Topic starter Posted : 28/11/2018 6:21 am
Progress
Member Moderator

@sebastian Weeks to months. Trying to interpret which side is better positioned or developed when the whole face is twisted into complex torsion can lead to wrong conclusions (see pic for an example). This is why it's important to use the rest of the body as an indicator of good mandibular positioning. Go by feel instead of looks. Biting towards the side that makes your shoulders feel more even, neck more balanced in between your trapezius and gives the tongue a more balanced contact with the palate will be the direction you want to develop towards.

 

As you see, the individual thirds can be not just too high or low, they can also be rotated excessively to left or right. These angles can get combined together in ways that create a false sense of development when comparing one side of the face to the other. The more drooping side of the maxillary arch may appear to have stronger jawline, or the side with the higher eye may appear to have less palatal width, and so on. Of course, asymmetry doesn't HAVE to be this complex, but it often is.

@drave Yes.

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Posted : 28/11/2018 9:53 am
sebastian
Eminent Member
Posted by: Progress

@sebastian Weeks to months. Trying to interpret which side is better positioned or developed when the whole face is twisted into complex torsion can lead to wrong conclusions (see pic for an example). This is why it's important to use the rest of the body as an indicator of good mandibular positioning. Go by feel instead of looks. Biting towards the side that makes your shoulders feel more even, neck more balanced in between your trapezius and gives the tongue a more balanced contact with the palate will be the direction you want to develop towards.

 

As you see, the individual thirds can be not just too high or low, they can also be rotated excessively to left or right. These angles can get combined together in ways that create a false sense of development when comparing one side of the face to the other. The more drooping side of the maxillary arch may appear to have stronger jawline, or the side with the higher eye may appear to have less palatal width, and so on. Of course, asymmetry doesn't HAVE to be this complex, but it often is.

@drave Yes.

I'm actually pretty sure i have the same problem as the 1st picture, the more drooping side of my face (the left) appears to have a stronger jawline, and my eye is higher on the right. It seems that my whole lower jaw is placed more to the left side, because of my maxilla shifting more to the left too. So i assume i should place my lower jaw more to the right. It feels easier to mew when i do it, but i can't really feel it anywhere else.

Edit: Huh, when i mew with your method, and place my jaw back to it's place again, i can actually feel it biting on my tongue. That makes me believe when i mew without this method, i actually don't get most of my tongue placed on the right part of my maxilla, which probably led to the asymmetries i have now.

And sorry for the bad explanation, english isn't my native language.

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Posted : 28/11/2018 10:33 am
sebastian
Eminent Member
Posted by: Progress

@sebastian Weeks to months. Trying to interpret which side is better positioned or developed when the whole face is twisted into complex torsion can lead to wrong conclusions (see pic for an example). This is why it's important to use the rest of the body as an indicator of good mandibular positioning. Go by feel instead of looks. Biting towards the side that makes your shoulders feel more even, neck more balanced in between your trapezius and gives the tongue a more balanced contact with the palate will be the direction you want to develop towards.

 

As you see, the individual thirds can be not just too high or low, they can also be rotated excessively to left or right. These angles can get combined together in ways that create a false sense of development when comparing one side of the face to the other. The more drooping side of the maxillary arch may appear to have stronger jawline, or the side with the higher eye may appear to have less palatal width, and so on. Of course, asymmetry doesn't HAVE to be this complex, but it often is.

@drave Yes.

If i can't feel a difference in my shoulders or overall posture, when i jut my jaw to either sides, do i just go by looks then?

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Posted : 29/11/2018 8:37 am
Progress
Member Moderator
Posted by: sebastian
Posted by: Progress

@sebastian Weeks to months. Trying to interpret which side is better positioned or developed when the whole face is twisted into complex torsion can lead to wrong conclusions (see pic for an example). This is why it's important to use the rest of the body as an indicator of good mandibular positioning. Go by feel instead of looks. Biting towards the side that makes your shoulders feel more even, neck more balanced in between your trapezius and gives the tongue a more balanced contact with the palate will be the direction you want to develop towards.

 

As you see, the individual thirds can be not just too high or low, they can also be rotated excessively to left or right. These angles can get combined together in ways that create a false sense of development when comparing one side of the face to the other. The more drooping side of the maxillary arch may appear to have stronger jawline, or the side with the higher eye may appear to have less palatal width, and so on. Of course, asymmetry doesn't HAVE to be this complex, but it often is.

@drave Yes.

If i can't feel a difference in my shoulders or overall posture, when i jut my jaw to either sides, do i just go by looks then?

It could be that you won't notice much difference unless you are already capable of standing very straight. I'm at a point where I can fully feel the tensegrity that is created between shoulders, tongue, torso and hips. It makes the coronal plane of the upper body tighten up like a stretched canvas. I could never get this postural tension quite balanced until I began pushing my mandible against the left maxillary arch (which is the more drooping side in my case). It always felt like something was off in the neck and shoulder area. 

At the very least, try to become aware of how your mandible feels in relation to your shoulders. Imagine a triangle that has points at your shoulders and mandible, then try to stretch each of these points away from each other while biting toward either left or right maxillary arch. One of these should make the head feel more balanced in between of your shoulders.

If all this sounds troublesome, then the remaining choice is to go by looks. Just keep your eyes open to the possibility that you have chosen to push to the wrong side. It should become apparent pretty fast.

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Posted : 29/11/2018 9:58 am
Drave
Active Member

So if my left side is droopy then i should bite towards right? My left side is droopy as well as my chin is little bit deviated to left too

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Topic starter Posted : 29/11/2018 10:01 am
Progress
Member Moderator
Posted by: Drave

So if my left side is droopy then i should bite towards right?

I just edited my previous post to mention this, but in my case I bite towards my drooping side, which is the left one just like yours is. My left side seems to have better palatal width, but it's also more downswung and recessed.

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Posted : 29/11/2018 10:05 am
Drave
Active Member

When i bite to left side (which is my droopy side) ..my lower lips seems too much deviated to left and my lips looks so uneven (misaligned)

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Topic starter Posted : 29/11/2018 10:07 am
sebastian
Eminent Member
Posted by: Progress
Posted by: sebastian
Posted by: Progress

@sebastian Weeks to months. Trying to interpret which side is better positioned or developed when the whole face is twisted into complex torsion can lead to wrong conclusions (see pic for an example). This is why it's important to use the rest of the body as an indicator of good mandibular positioning. Go by feel instead of looks. Biting towards the side that makes your shoulders feel more even, neck more balanced in between your trapezius and gives the tongue a more balanced contact with the palate will be the direction you want to develop towards.

 

As you see, the individual thirds can be not just too high or low, they can also be rotated excessively to left or right. These angles can get combined together in ways that create a false sense of development when comparing one side of the face to the other. The more drooping side of the maxillary arch may appear to have stronger jawline, or the side with the higher eye may appear to have less palatal width, and so on. Of course, asymmetry doesn't HAVE to be this complex, but it often is.

@drave Yes.

If i can't feel a difference in my shoulders or overall posture, when i jut my jaw to either sides, do i just go by looks then?

It could be that you won't notice much difference unless you are already capable of standing very straight. I'm at a point where I can fully feel the tensegrity that is created between shoulders, tongue, torso and hips. It makes the coronal plane of the upper body tighten up like a stretched canvas. I could never get this postural tension quite balanced until I began pushing my mandible against the left maxillary arch (which is the more drooping side in my case). It always felt like something was off in the neck and shoulder area. 

At the very least, try to become aware of how your mandible feels in relation to your shoulders. Imagine a triangle that has points at your shoulders and mandible, then try to stretch each of these points away from each other while biting toward either left or right maxillary arch. One of these should make the head feel more balanced in between of your shoulders.

If all this sounds troublesome, then the remaining choice is to go by looks. Just keep your eyes open to the possibility that you have chosen to push to the wrong side. It should become apparent pretty fast.

When i move my jaw more to the right, i can feel my tongue is more engaged on the upper palete, so i would guess that would be the right place.

I've also noticed that my left shoulder is a little higher than my right one, maybe it could be a slight case of scoliosis. Not sure if i understand the triangle thing you're talking about. Should i stretch my shoulders downwards and away from my mandible?

My lower incisors are also quite crooked, which makes it difficult to bite to another side.

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Posted : 29/11/2018 11:17 am
sebastian
Eminent Member
Posted by: Progress
Posted by: Drave

So if my left side is droopy then i should bite towards right?

I just edited my previous post to mention this, but in my case I bite towards my drooping side, which is the left one just like yours is. My left side seems to have better palatal width, but it's also more downswung and recessed.

My right side is the one that's more downswung and has less palatal width, so would that be the place i should bite? It's honestly so hard to tell, when i got asymmetries on both sides of my face, and can't feel the physical difference you're talking about when jutting the jaw to a specific side.

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Posted : 30/11/2018 2:50 pm
Drave
Active Member

I think he said to bite towards the side which have more droopiness, but in my case if i do that my lips looks too uneven as my lower jaw is misaligned

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Topic starter Posted : 01/12/2018 1:04 am
Progress
Member Moderator

@sebastian. Ah, nevermind. You are at a point where my tips won't be of much use yet. Resolving scoliosis should be a priority together with proper tongue posture. It's unlikely that controlled jaw positioning will achieve much when the spine is not already somewhat straight.  

@drave  You do you. Our cases of CFD are not identical, regardless of some shared characteristics. I'm not trying to tell you exactly how you should position your jaw, I'm trying to help you figure out it for yourself.

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Posted : 01/12/2018 8:36 am
Yusu liked
sebastian
Eminent Member
Posted by: Progress

@sebastian. Ah, nevermind. You are at a point where my tips won't be of much use yet. Resolving scoliosis should be a priority together with proper tongue posture. It's unlikely that controlled jaw positioning will achieve much when the spine is not already somewhat straight.  

@drave  You do you. Our cases of CFD are not identical, regardless of some shared characteristics. I'm not trying to tell you exactly how you should position your jaw, I'm trying to help you figure out it for yourself.

I'm probably gonna see someone to check if i have scoliosis, since i'm not quite sure if i do. I also just discovered i wasn't pushing on the hard palate, so i was only pushing upwards and not forwards.If i do have scoliosis that would probably be the cause to my lopsided maxilla. I've seen the post about mewing with scoliosis, where you mention to mew on the less developed side. It looks like my left side is less developed by looking at the upper arch, my left side is higher, but my jaw is bigger on the left side, and my nose seems to be slanted a little bite more to that side too. So i'm quite unsure on where i should mew.

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Posted : 01/12/2018 2:56 pm
EddieMoney
Reputable Member

My right shoulder is up and forward more than my left. My right hip is externally rotated more than my left. And with all this my neck was rotated to the left and also my head was tilted to the right. On top of this I used to tense my left cheek more than my right for some reason. My maxilla is then higher on the right, drooping on the left , and seems to be facing more to the right in general.

All of this had to be addressed before I addressed mewing. Time to time I have to turn my right foot in as I stand. 

I also like mewing to where I see my face in the mirror and I can see my asymmetries as if I was looking at my reflection. In other words positioning my head properly and my neck/spine makes it so that I can see my maxilla's roll/pitch/yaw in all of its wacky off balance tendency. Basically the way I started positioning my head my face now is exposing all of its asymmetries. 

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Posted : 04/12/2018 8:30 am
lil nut
Eminent Member

Estimating that you have the same problem that i have( My teeth are also misasligned and one side is slanted to the more developed side), i think the problem is that one massater was stronger than the other while the  mandile was developing. I took  gonial angle shots and found out that the less developed side has an angle 5-10 more obtuse. This probably means that the muscle is weaker( the muscle has a direct effect on the gonail angle)so its now more droopy. You cant really feel if one muscle is stronger than the other but I am strenthening my droopy side by clenthing and chewing more on that side. Hopefully this helps. good luck!

I hope this photo helps you understand what effect the massater has on how the mandile looks.

Figure 6

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Posted : 09/12/2018 6:58 pm
Pedromisael4
New Member

I have literally the same problem as yours. I've been mewing a few months with correct jaw position, it has solved my TMJ problems and also my maxilla was pushed forward so it looks more symmetrical. Before mewing I thought my right masseter muscle wasn't the same size as my left, but now I see they both the same.

Pd: That is solving my asymmetry, since I take selfies and then do mirror mode in my phone setting so I can see progress. My eye area has improved, becoming more hooded, that has given me my eyes to look a little bit equally sized, but not fully. Idk whether to expand more my right side (It has already upward growth but not too forward growth) so I combine pushing up my left side and widening my right side palate.

Been working, but always  taking pictures in many angles 

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Posted : 21/04/2019 8:30 pm
manal
New Member
Posted by: openbytes17

Hey OP, i have the same issue. I already had an asymmetric maxilla due to mouthbreathing however i stupidly got braces resulting in a more asymmetric face, eyes, cheekbones as the braces made my recessed side of teeth even more reccessed. The teeth on this side also appear higher. I am now in the process of mewing to fix this.

I know something is happening as every morning i wake up the cheekbones on my recessed side are puffy and red. 

I also have an asymmetric maxilla due to mouth breathing and i have week cheek bones and because of that my whole right side looks dropped (when i take a picture), and i was thinking about getting braces but i will not. Thank you!! cuz you saved me from doing something that could make my asymmetric face look worse.❤️ 

 
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Posted : 21/05/2019 7:45 am
Yusu
 Yusu
Trusted Member

Hey guys,

on which side should I mew more?

Problem is, my cheekbones left are improved, but my eye is asymmetrical and my left chin is weaker.

But my right cheekbones are weaker as the left ond, should I mew right side for better cheekbones? But what is with my chin and eye left side?

 

And for me pressing slightly my teeth together (1mm appart) is very hard for my cheekbones, is this normal in ghe beginning?

 

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Posted : 01/09/2019 5:20 am
Vyr9
 Vyr9
Active Member

@lil-nut I would agree with you on this. I've been chewing with my left molars exclusively for about 10 years and it has had this exact effect on my jaw (not all that visible in my picture though).

Whether this is because of the masseter directly affecting the bone or because of the tongue expanding my left side more, I don't know. Chewing not only strengthens the chewing muscles but it also strenghtens the tongue in a certain direction.

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Posted : 20/06/2020 4:32 am