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1.5 year difference - open bite fixed but bone loss present  

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Sean
 Sean
New Member

I discovered Mike Mew in February 2019 with the goal of naturally fixing my open bite caused by tongue thrusting. I changed my posture and started chewing Falim and Chios with cold water in July 2019. By January 2020 over 1mm of bone surrounding the roots had disappeared. Around February 2020 I got greedy and started clenching and belt pulling. My dentist and I didn't notice any of the damage until yesterday.

 

On the plus side, my open bite has been fixed. From now on I will chew less and keep my teeth in moderate contact with a suction hold. I still have a narrow palate and can't sleep on my back due to jaw recession, but there's not much to improve at 24 given this amount of bone loss.

 

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Posted : 09/07/2020 5:48 pm
Kilroy
Active Member

When I started chewing falim my teeth would sometimes get sore, but now 2 years later I have never experienced that no matter how much I chew.

Perhaps you overdid it?

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Posted : 10/07/2020 6:39 am
chiefkeefsosa
Active Member

@eddiemoney

You think his lower third shortened?

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Posted : 10/07/2020 11:41 am
Sean
 Sean
New Member

@kilroy

Yeah I chewed for hours sometimes. Plus my teeth were already in a mesially tilted position allowing jiggling forces more likely to disrupt the bone.

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Posted : 10/07/2020 11:49 am
Kilroy
Active Member

@sean

https://smileworkshop.com/can-braces-cause-bone-loss-around-teeth-if-yes-how-2/

This site claims that those who lose bone due to braces usually have their bone grow back.

Perhaps the same thing would apply to you.

I also wonder, how significant is 1mm of bone loss?

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Posted : 10/07/2020 12:12 pm
Sean
 Sean
New Member

@kilroy

Thanks for the hope. Unfortunately my dentist said it can't grow back and any amount of bone loss is not good, but the gingiva attaches up to 3mm above bone. So if I lose more bone my  gums will start to recede and everything would start to collapse. At that point bone and gum grafting become options.

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Posted : 10/07/2020 12:32 pm
Elwynn
Estimable Member

I don't disbelieve you, but I don't understand why gum chewing, if at excessive rates, would cause significant bone loss. I mean, what's the mechanism at play here?

24 years old

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Posted : 19/07/2020 2:00 am
Sean
 Sean
New Member

@elwynn
I grew up with a soft diet and didn't chew much gum, which probably reduced the bone density surrounding my teeth. This study shows that a soft diet decreases density in mice:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4002541/

All of the heavy forces on the weak bone probably caused resorption. I'd like to see more wing bite x-rays of people who recently started chewing hard gum, they may not be realizing they're losing bone. Dentists are slow to point this stuff out too. I had to mention it myself since they don't want to scare the patient until serious problems show up. The whole industry is largely based on treating instead of preventing.

 

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Posted : 20/07/2020 11:42 pm
CrimsonChin
Active Member

The whole soft diet thing seems so overblown when talking about it as a contributor or difference maker between any modern western people, since the majority of food is soft, it'd be quite unlikely to find much of a disparity in overall jaw usage, unless you eat nothing but yogurt or baby formula.

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Posted : 21/07/2020 2:03 am
Elwynn
Estimable Member

@sean

Wouldn't the body eventually adjust and start strengthening the bone in response? I can see how excessive and sudden chewing after a lifelong habit of soft-chewing could cause permanent damage, but it doesn't make much sense to me that the body would not just resist adaptation, but move in the opposite direction (away from beneficial adaptation) in response to slow, and gradual introduction to harder foods. Our bones adapt as we begin to lift weights, why wouldn't the skull do the same in response to chewing?

24 years old

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Posted : 21/07/2020 12:56 pm
Sean
 Sean
New Member

@elwynn

There's a lot of jiggling forces going on in the mouth, which isn't a factor when lifting weights.

It could also be from the extreme forces caused by the open bite. All of the forces were concentrated on a few molar cusps, and the premolars had zero action for years. This may have made it more of a shock, causing resorption.

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Posted : 21/07/2020 4:33 pm
Elwynn
Estimable Member

@sean

I see. But I'm still surprised that your dentist believes that the bone loss is permanent, and that recovery is unlikely. Perhaps he's used to observing patients who experience bone loss due to aging? In your case, though, there was a clear cause behind bone re-absorption, and now that cause has been removed, since you stopped clenching and belt-pulling. I have no medical knowledge at all, but in my peasant opinion, at least some degree of recovery should be possible.

24 years old

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Posted : 23/07/2020 4:38 pm